Drive Your Career Mentoring Program registrations close soon

Registrations for the Drive Your Career Mentoring Program close 8 May for those in the food, beverage, manufacturing and packaging industries.

The new Drive Your Career Mentoring program is designed to support men and women to reach their potential in the food, beverage, manufacturing and packaging industries.

The program is supported by collaborative associations AIP, APPMA, LATMA, PACKAGING COUNCIL OF NZ and SPE, and is an industry program designed for everyone; whether you are starting your career or in need of a kickstart.

The program enables participants to master new skills and techniques over a 12 week period that allows them to create new patterns of behaviour, increased self-esteem and confidence in their own abilities. They will also have access to fortnightly webinars with guest speakers from within our industry.

The Drive Your Career Mentoring program is a newly-improved version of the Ignite Packaging initiative that the industry successfully launched in 2014 and is designed to cater for all stages of career cycle to give a new jumpstart.

According to Maureen Frank, managing director of Emberin, “the Drive Your Career Mentoring Program is all about you – your life, your career and your growth as a person and your development as a leader in all parts of your life, including your family, your community and your organisation. 

“Through our other mentoring programs we have personally witnessed some phenomenal changes in individuals – from astonishing career moves, to life balance plans that work, to winning new customers and clients – in all we have seen participants move their own mindsets – they have been able to shift their thought process around what they believe may be possible for them, as individuals – and then – act on it with great success,”

“The Drive Your Career Mentoring Program will allow you to focus on yourself for the 12 week program – and that is something that we, as, in our busy lives, rarely do,” Frank said.

Every company in the industry is invited to ‘sponsor’ two participants in the Drive Your Career Mentoring program.

 

Dr Carol Lawrence awarded AIP Fellowship

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) have awarded Dr Carol Lawrence Phd, Environmental & Sustainability Specialist, UPM Raflatac Oceania a Fellowship.

The grade of Fellow is the highest recognition to AIP members and is designed to recognise the significant and sustained contribution to the technology, science or application to packaging in the industry.

Carol’s experience in the label industry spans over twenty years, starting with a technical role at Jac Australia that underpinned the selection of the most appropriate label material for the required application. This role was enhanced by a background in chemistry, including a PhD in polymer chemistry, gained in the UK. Carol has an understanding of adhesive properties combined with developments in the packaging industry that have led to opportunities in marketing and many product innovations as self-adhesive labelling in Australia has grown in capability.

In her more recent focus with UPM Raflatac on the environmental aspects of self-adhesive labelling, combined with the sustainability of the raw materials used, Carol is involved in new raw material selection and waste management programs that enhance the company’s Biofore portfolio and strives for long term sustainable label solutions.

According to Ralph Moyle, FAIP, National President of the AIP, Dr Carol Lawrence has displayed all the requirements and more to be awarded a Fellow.

“Carol has and continues to share her knowledge and expertise with many in the industry, giving freely and willingly of her time and experiences. Over many years she has ensured that others benefit from that which has learnt, never hesitating to show and educate others so that they too will one day hopefully pass on knowledge,” Moyle said.

“Carol has an enormous depth of understanding in a field of packaging that challenges many. She displays great passion, understanding and patience to ensure that others can benefit from that which she knows. The AIP acknowledges her generosity of imparting so willingly of her expertise, experiences and knowledge both through the various educational programs as well as via the numerous AIP formal opportunities and informal pathways.” he said.

 

AIP launch Mentoring program at AUSPACK

The AIP, in collaboration with Emberin, has launched the new Drive Your Career Mentoring program designed to support men and women to reach their potential in the food, beverage, manufacturing and packaging industries.

The program is supported by collaborative associations APPMA, LATMA, PAC NZ and SPE, is designed for everyone; whether you are starting your career or in need of a kickstart.

The program enables participants to master new skills and techniques over a 12 week period that allows them to create new patterns of behaviour, increased self-esteem and confidence in their own abilities. They will also have access to fortnightly webinars with guest speakers from within our industry.

It is a newly-improved version of the Ignite Packaging initiative that the Institute successfully launched in 2014 and is designed to cater for all stages of career cycle to give a new jumpstart.

According to Maureen Frank, managing director of Emberin, “the AIP Drive Your Career Mentoring Program is all about you – your life, your career and your growth as a person and your development as a leader in all parts of your life, including your family, your community and your organisation.”

“Through our other mentoring programs we have personally witnessed some phenomenal changes in individuals – from astonishing career moves, to life balance plans that work, to winning new customers and clients – in all we have seen participants move their own mindsets – they have been able to shift their thought process around what they believe may be possible for them, as individuals – and then – act on it with great success,”

“The AIP Drive Your Career Mentoring Program will allow you to focus on yourself for the 12 week program – and that is something that we, as, in our busy lives, rarely do.” Frank said.

The 2015 AIP Drive Your Career program was launched at the 2015 National Technical Forums which were held alongside AUSPACK. Expressions of Interest are now open and applications close on Friday the 8th of May.

The AIP invites every company in the industry to ‘sponsor’ two participants in the Drive Your Career Mentoring program. To access an application form email info@aipack.com.au.

 

CPP designation reaches Australia

The Certified Packaging Professional designation will become the leading mark of excellence internationally under a new partnership announced by the Institute of Packaging Professionals (IoPP) in the U.S. and the Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP).

IoPP and AIP will mutually recognise CPP as the gold standard of broad packaging proficiency under a program in which AIP members will join qualifying IoPP members as being eligible for certification.

Approximately 2,000 packaging professionals have earned the CPP designation, a trademark of IoPP, since the program was launched 1972. CPP is a designation some of the leading packaging companies in the world want their influential team members to have because it demonstrates broad competency in all major areas of packaging. CPPs today typically enjoy more senior, decision-making positions in their companies, and research also suggests that holders of CPP often out-earn their non-certified peers.

“Having the AIP as our first international CPP partner is a critical step to internationalising the CPP program and ensuring that we have a singular, unified approach for recognising packaging professionals around the globe,” said Patrick Farrey, executive director of the IoPP.

“We expect that regional packaging organisations in other countries will follow AIP’s lead. This is an important step because CPP helps assure that packaging teams around the world that need to work with each other can do so with the same approach, because they have all attained a high level of proficiency in packaging the same way,” Farrey said.

“The net result is greater efficiency among global packaging teams and as a result, more efficiency use of critical budget dollars and greater opportunities for reduced product time to shelf.” he said.

Ralph Moyle, FAIP, national president, AIP, added that “Being able to offer the CPP credential in Australasia allows packaging professionals in our industry the opportunity to join recognised packaging experts from around the world with the industry’s leading professional designation.”

“Attaining the CPP designation is an excellent investment in your professional development, and the credential defines the packaging professional and allows organisations to seek out and hire the right professional based on verified knowledge, skills and industry contributions,” Moyle said.

“Using the CPP program to assess and evaluate one’s professional competency validates you as internationally proficient as a packaging professional, a cut above your peers.” he said. Under the AIP-IoPP partnership, members in good standing of either AIP or IoPP (at the Premium or Elite member levels) are eligible for the certification program. The program foremost requires that the candidate pass a 150-question online multiple-choice exam. They must also complete other qualifications, such as providing a Resume of Activities which enables them to demonstrate their industry expertise in multiple dimensions, subject to a review panel put together by IoPP and AIP.

For complete details and requirements on the CPP program, email educate@aipack.com.au.

 

2015 APPMA Scholarship Finalists announced

Finalists have been announced for the 2015 APPMA Scholarship, which provides the opportunity to complete a Diploma in Packaging Technology.

The Diploma in Packaging Technology is an internationally recognised qualification that will prepare students to take responsibility for packaging operations at any level through the supply chain. The qualification is comprehensive, and provides an opportunity to study the principles of packaging, packaging materials and packaging processes.

The four finalists are:

  • Marianna McEwan, Contract Packaging Technologist, Frucor Beverages
  • Mona Parnian, Quality Systems Engineer, Wellman Packaging
  • Alexandra Brayshaw, Accessibility Design Researcher, Arthritis Australia
  • Alysha Baggett AAIP, Packaging Technologist, Frucor Beverages

The winner will be announced on the 25th of March as a part of the 2015 APPMA Industry Excellence Awards at Crown Towers.

 

2015 APPMA Scholarship applications open

Submissions are now open for the APPMA scholarship program which provides the opportunity to complete a Diploma in Packaging Technology to the value of over $9000.

The Diploma in Packaging Technology is an internationally recognised qualification that will prepare students to take responsibility for packaging operations at any level through the supply chain. The qualification is comprehensive, and provides an opportunity to study the principles of packaging, packaging materials and packaging processes.

Mark Dingley, Chairman of the APPMA, said the Annual Scholarship Program is a unique opportunity for a packaging engineer to attain a Diploma in Packaging Technology and further their education in the packaging industry.

“The APPMA has been offering this educational program now for seven years and it is encouraging to see some of the previous winners now graduating from the Diploma,” Dingley said.

Ralph Moyle, MAIP, National President of the AIP, said “the Diploma in Packaging Technology is an internationally recognised course that will provide exemplary skills to graduates and we commend the APPMA for their long-term commitment to educational growth within the packaging industry. We encourage all packaging engineers in Australia to apply.”

Submissions close 30 January with the 2015 winner being announced at the APPMA Industry Excellence Awards, held in conjunction with AUSPACK 2015 at the Melbourne Convention & Exhibition Centre.

For more information, click here.

 

Sealing in safety: the importance of tamper-evidence

While it may represent an additional cost for manufacturers, ensuring your packaging has a tamper-evident design is a safe move.

Packaging security is critical to food, for keeping food fresh as well as safe to eat. Packaging security can protect against everything from consumer tampering to bioterrorism to product counterfeiting.

Definition of tamper-evident packaging
Packaging having an indicator or barrier to entry which, if breached or missing, can reasonably be expected to provide visible or audible evidence to consumers that tampering has occurred.

Tamper evidence in packaging
Tampering involves the intentional altering of information, a product, a package, or system. Solutions may involve all phases of product production, distribution, logistics, sale, and use. No single solution can be considered as ‘tamper proof’. Most times many levels of security need to be considered to minimise the risk of tampering.

Some considerations are:

  • • Identify all feasible methods of unauthorised access into a product or package. In addition to the primary means of entry, also consider secondary or ‘back door’ methods.
  • Identify type of tampering, what level of knowledge, materials or equipment.
  • Improve the tamper resistance by making tampering more difficult.
  • Add tamper-evident features to help indicate the existence of tampering.
  • Educate consumers to be aware of tampering.
  • Ensure that the window of opportunity to tamper is minimised.
  • Ensure that the time available for tampering is decreased.

Product packaging
Tamper-evident design is possibly most visible in product packaging and labelling, where it can be critical to know that the product has not been modified since leaving the manufacturer.

Cans of baby food were among the first cases, where manufacturers were extorted by persons claiming to have added various poisons to baby food and replaced them on supermarket shelves. The threat of public fear meant that tamper-evident design principles had the potential to save a lot of money in the future.

Jars of food items soon started appearing with a metal bubble-top lid, commonly known as a ‘safety button’, which popped out if the jar had been opened and stayed flat if the jar was not ever opened. Customers were advised not to buy a product with a popped lid.

Newer jars of food tend to come with a plastic shrink-sleeve on the edge of the lid, which is removed when opening.

The Johnson & Johnson Tylenol crisis of 1982 involved over-the-counter medications. Due to various regulations, many manufacturers of food (and medicine) now use induction sealing to assist in providing evidence of tampering. Packaging that tears open in a ragged manner or otherwise cannot be resealed is also used to help indicate tampering.

In many cases, multiple layers or indicators are used because no single layer or device is ‘tamper-proof’. Consideration should be given to unique indicators (which are to be changed regularly to avoid counterfeiting).

End-users and consumers need to be educated to keep an eye open for signs of tampering, both at the primary and at secondary levels of packaging.

Track and trace
Processors and their suppliers are developing a variety of packaging technologies to keep food safe from such interference and to provide fast, thorough product tracking and tracing in the event of a recall.

Covert and overt packaging techniques are developing more and more and becoming substantially more sophisticated. Covert techniques require a scanner or other device for detection. Marking packages with invisible, ultraviolet-luminescent ink is an example of covert security. Overt refers to something visible on the package, such as a batch code or tamper-evident bands.

RFID tags as a form of tamper evidence
The radio frequency identification (RFID) tags consist of a tamper-evident technology to ensure that the RFID tag has not been interfered with after initial positioning on an article. These tags, if tampered with, become disabled, thereby preventing use of the tags on counterfeit or substitute products, and ensuring that detecting a working tag also means identifying the original product to which it is attached. As food and beverage companies increasingly experiment with RFID to satisfy retailer demands, they are enjoying the side benefit of greater control of cases and pallets moving through the supply chain. The heightened control increases the security of products during distribution.

A fundamental reason to incorporate security features into packaging is to provide protection against vindictive tampering, or at least evidence of an attempt. Tamper-evident packages typically show visible signs of interfering, such as a broken seal.

The time has come for us to commence placing tamper evidence onto any product that touches the body and is ingested, inhaled or absorbed into the blood stream.

Pierre Pienaar is education director at the Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP).


 

AIP national conference: Ignite program, fellowships and APPMA scholarship announcements

The Australian Institute of Packaging’s ‘Packaging and Innovation Excellence’ annual conference took place last week and was inclusive of a number of special announcements including the launch of the pilot Ignite Packaging mentoring program for women.

The program is designed for women working in the food, beverage, manufacturing and packaging industries and aims to transform participants professionally and personally. The program enables participants to master new skills and techniques over a 12 week period and is inclusive of fortnightly webinars featuring guest speakers from within the industry.

According to the AIP, the program provides organisations with a powerful employee brand and employee benefit tool by helping them attract and retain females in their workforce. Applications close on 25 July.

In addition to the launch of the Ignite Program, fellowships and scholarships were also announced during the AIP conference dinner on Tuesday 17 June.

Both Ralph Moyle and Craig Wellman were awarded the grade of fellow in recognition of a significant and sustained contribution to the technology, science or application of packaging within the industry.

Ralph Moyle, packaging development officer, Simplot Australia and national president of the AIP, was recognised for the significant contribution he has made to the packaging industry over the last 40 years.

Ralph Moyle’s role in many significant and innovative Shelf-Friendly Packaging developments that are currently in-stores around Australia and New Zealand are one of the key contributors to this recognition.  

Craig Wellman, chief executive officer, Wellman Packaging, was awarded for demonstrating innovative packaging leadership in the area of plastics technology and injection moulded closures over the last two decades. Wellman holds a number of patents as an inventor, especially in the area of injection moulded closures.

The winner of the APPMA sixth annual scholarship program was also announced during the conference dinner.

Mark Dingley, chairman of the APPMA presented the scholarship to Aleah Back, Packaging Engineer, Johnson and Johnson Pacific. The scholarship enables Back to study a Diploma in Packaging Technology.

“Aleah is an ideal candidate for the scholarship as she has shown a huge interest and commitment in undertaking the Diploma in Packaging Technology. She has both academic and practical expertise in the industry and is keen to expand her Technical Education in the Packaging Industry,” said Dingley.

“Aleah not only has an interest in packaging but also the engineering process and she has had the opportunity to learn about injection technology, in-mould labelling and advanced robotic production systems. Aleah will commence her Diploma in Packaging Technology this year and we look forward to seeing her graduate.”

 

AIP Conference highlights packaging trends, challenges and opportunities

The 2014 Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) National Conference in Packaging and Innovation excellence kicked off this morning at the Sofitel Wentworth in Sydney.

Following a formal address by national president of the AIP, Ralph Moyle, president of the World Packaging Organisation, Thomas L Schneider spoke of the road ahead for the packaging industry at large. Schneider identified the rising middle class in developing nations such as India, China and Sub-Saharan Africa as those with the biggest growth opportunities in terms of economic strata.

“The middle class is where the opportunity for packaging is. As these countries grow, their middle class is going to grow and that is where the opportunity is for packaging in food, beverage and electronics,” he said.

Rick Fox, chairman of the Association for Packaging and Processing Technologies (PMMI) then took the stage to talk about the industry from a macro-economic perspective where he pinpointed particular trends that are currently taking place within the United States. According to Fox, one of the biggest challenges that North America’s retail ready sector is facing is the push towards online, and advances in technology in relation to smartphone apps.

“The sensitivity to the changes in packaging at the consumer level is phenomenal,” said Fox. “People are walking into the point of sale and scanning the barcode [with their smartphones]. If the label that comes up on the internet is different to the one that they are looking at, they won’t buy the product. That’s the level of sensitivity.”

In addition to Schneider and Fox, other speakers of note included Geoffrey Annison, deputy chief executive and director of health nutrition and scientific affairs at the Australian Food and Grocery Council (AFGC) who discussed the move by regulatory bodies to examine the migration of chemicals from packaging into food; and Heini Lehti from the Global Sustainability and Forest Certification Project who spoke about the Chain of Custody Certification and sustainable fibre sourcing.

The 2014 AIP National Conference: Packaging and Innovation Excellence will continue until tomorrow, Wednesday 18 June.

 

APPMA scholarship finalists announced

The APPMA, in conjunction with the AIP, have announced the four finalists for their sixth annual scholarship program.

The program will enable a packaging engineer the opportunity to complete a Diploma in Packaging Technology, valued at over $9000.

The Diploma is an internationally recognised Level 5 foundation degree qualification – specifically designed for packaging engineers – that prepares students to take responsibility for packaging operations at any level through the supply chain.

The 2014 finalists are:

  • Aleah Back, Packaging Engineer, Johnson and Johnson Pacific,
  • Alexandra Brayshaw, Research Assistant, Arthritis Australia,
  • Mirvic Camacho, Packaging Engineer, Murray Goulburn
  • Sumit Kini, Continuous Improvement Specialist, Orora Glass.

Last year’s scholarship winner, Jamie Schellebeck, is a Packaging Engineer at Amcor Fibre Packaging.

“Winning the scholarship in 2013 was a wonderful opportunity for me and I am eager to gain more technical expertise in the packaging industry by undertaking the Diploma in Packaging Technology. I look forward to graduating from the course in a few years.” Schelleback said.

The 2014 winner will be announced during the AIP National Conference which will be held on Tuesday the 17th and Wednesday the 18th of June at the Sofitel Sydney.

 

Pienaar named vice president, education, for World Packaging Organisation

Ex-president of the Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP), Pierre Pienaar, has been named vice president, responsible for Education, on the World Packaging Organisation (WPO) board.

Pienaar had association with the WPO in the 1990s in his role as president of the Institute of Packaging South Africa. After becoming involved with the AIP in 2002, he began the push for Australia to become a member of the WPO, which came to fruition in 2010.

During his term as AIP president (2010-2012), Pienaar played a significant role in ensuring AIP’s membership on the WPO’s Education and Marketing Committees. Once on the Education Committee, he agitated WPO to take up the challenge of delivering more to developing nations in the form of education and training. When Lebanon had to withdraw from hosting the May 2013 board meeting owing to uncertain security, Pienaar invited WPO and its members to relocate the meeting to Sydney, which included the annual World Stars Awards and gala dinner.

Since then, WPO has called on the AIP’s Education Committee to deliver packaging education in developing countries including Malaysia, Indonesia, Nigeria and Singapore. Later this year he travels to Nigeria for follow up training, then to Ghana. Vietnam and China have also shown keen interest in AIP’s courses, delivered under the WPO banner.

Pienaar had association with the WPO in the 1990s in his role as president of the Institute of Packaging South Africa. After becoming involved with the AIP in 2002, he began the push for Australia to become a member of the WPO, which came to fruition in 2010.

During his term as AIP president (2010-2012), Pienaar played a significant role in ensuring AIP’s membership on the WPO’s Education and Marketing Committees. Once on the Education Committee, he agitated WPO to take up the challenge of delivering more to developing nations in the form of education and training. When Lebanon had to withdraw from hosting the May 2013 board meeting owing to uncertain security, Pienaar invited WPO and its members to relocate the meeting to Sydney, which included the annual World Stars Awards and gala dinner.

Since then, WPO has called on the AIP’s Education Committee to deliver packaging education in developing countries including Malaysia, Indonesia, Nigeria and Singapore. Later this year he travels to Nigeria for follow up training, then to Ghana. Vietnam and China have also shown keen interest in AIP’s courses, delivered under the WPO banner.

 

AIP Conference less than a month away

The largest packing conference in Australia and New Zealand is nearly upon us, with less than a month to go.

On 17 and 18 June, the 2014 AIP National Conference: Packaging & Innovation Excellence will cater for delegates from all facets of the packaging industry of both technologist and management levels.

The conference will host 40 speakers from seven countries and will be held at the Sofitel Wentworth.

Some of the technical papers that will be presented over the two days include:

  • Chemical migration from packaging to food
  • Innovative Responsible Packaging
  • Chain of Custody Certification and Sustainable Fibre Sourcing
  • The latest generation in metallocene polyethylene products
  • Zero waste at events and venues
  • The use of polybutene-1 based products in flexible packaging

Keynote speakers include:

  • Bryan McKay FAIP, director packaging development – Asia Pacific, Campbell Arnotts will speak on validating innovative packaging
  • Fran Bova FAIP, packaging manager, Kimberly-Clark Australia will discuss a shelf ready shippers case study looking at various requirements from box making, compatibility with existing case packing equipment, board grade and strength considerations, distribution, marketing requirements and retail shelf requirements.
  • Nicolas Georges, RD&Q director, Premium Chocolate & Dairy, Asia Pacific, Mondelez International will discuss ‘What if the Silicon Valley of food manufacturing was in Australia’?
  • Craig Walker MAIP, national packaging manager – PET, Coca-Cola Amatil. Walker will provide a presentation about the award winner packaging and innovations designed from Coca-Cola Amatil.
  • Bassam Hallak, director, Innovation Discovery & Insights, Avery Dennison –  Consumer Insight trends and impact on Packaging.
  • Nina Cleeve-Edwards MAIP, packaging specialist, Nestle Oceania, on innovation in packaging sustainability.
  • Paul Horn, strategic procurement director – Technical, LION, on Delivering New to Business Innovation.

For the full program, click here.

 

Registrations open for AIP National Conference

Registrations are open 2014 AIP National Conference, to be held on 17 and 18 June.

The conference will host 40 speakers from seven countries and is ideally suited for the food, beverage, manufacturing and packaging industries, offering networking opportunities from professionals both here and abroad.

The event will be held at the Sofitel Wentworth, Sydney and have a theme of ‘Packaging and Innovation Excellence’.

Keynote speakers include:

·         Bryan McKay FAIP, director packaging development – Asia Pacific, Campbell Arnotts will speak on validating innovative packaging

·         Fran Bova FAIP, packaging manager, Kimberly-Clark Australia will discuss a shelf ready shippers case study looking at various requirements from box making, compatibility with existing case packing equipment, board grade and strength considerations, distribution, marketing requirements and retail shelf requirements.

·         Nicolas Georges, RD&Q director, Premium Chocolate & Dairy, Asia Pacific, Mondelez International will discuss ‘What if the Silicon Valley of food manufacturing was in Australia’?

·         Craig Walker MAIP, national packaging manager – PET, Coca-Cola Amatil. Walker will provide a presentation about the award winner packaging and innovations designed from Coca-Cola Amatil.

·         Bassam Hallak, director, Innovation Discovery & Insights, Avery Dennison –  Consumer Insight trends and impact on Packaging.

·         Nina Cleeve-Edwards MAIP, packaging specialist, Nestle Oceania, on innovation in packaging sustainability.

·         Paul Horn, strategic procurement director – Technical, LION, on Delivering New to Business Innovation.

International speakers include:

·         Massimo Annatarone, Gualapack Packaging System

·         Prof Ing Matthias Niemeyer, chief executive officer, KHS

·         Peter Lockery, H.B Fuller

·         Paul Taulien, Sidel Group

·         Antony Conway, Esko

·         Doug Kunneman and Mark Vergauwen from Nature Works

·         Andreas Schweiger, Rofin-Baasel LaserTech.

For the full program, click here.

AIP scholarship winner graduates

Andrew U’Ren, one of the AIP scholarship winners from the Southern Cross Awards program in 2011 has graduated from the Certificate in Packaging.

Previously a graphic design student, U’Ren said the scholarship allowed him to expand on his knowledge of packaging in specific areas of interest.

“Being an online based course presented challenges that can often thwart a student’s learning experience, but the AIP provided me with fantastic mentors from the packaging industry who not only provided me with a wealth of information but who also helped me stay positive and active,” U’Ren said.

He kept in contact with AIP mentors via email and Skype, who answered his questions, proof read his work and sourced packaging textbooks.

U’Ren is currently looking to combine his degree in graphic design with his certificate to seek employment in the packaging industry.

 

Packaging Technology scholarship applications close 11 April

The closing date is approaching for a $9000 scholarship for a packing engineer to complete a Diploma in Packaging Technology.

The Australian Packaging and Processing Machinery Association (APPMA), in conjunction with the Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) are offering the scholarship their sixth year.

The diploma is an internationally recognised level 5 foundation degree qualification that aims to prepare students for packaging operations at any level through the supply chain.

 Chairman of the APPMA Mark Dingley says the scholarship is a unique opportunity for a packing engineer to further their education in the packaging industry.

 “The APPMA has been offering this educational program now for six years and we have been very pleased with the calibre of winners; all of whom are busy completing their Diplomas as we speak,” Mr Dingley said.

Jamie Schellebeck, who was 2013 scholarship winner, is a Packaging Engineer at Amcor Fibre Packaging.

“Winning the scholarship in 2013 was a wonderful opportunity for me and I am eager to gain more technical expertise in the packaging industry by undertaking the Diploma in Packaging Technology. I look forward to graduating from the course in a few years.” Mr Schelleback said.

To download an application form, visit the APPMA or AIP website.

Submissions close on 11 April.

 

10 things you didn’t know about plastics

Did you know that the word Nylon is derived from New York and London?

Few of us stop to think twice about the pack we are about to open. All that our minds are focussed on at the time is to get to the contents, so when we experience difficulty in opening the pack we have lots to say about packaging in general.

Packaging plays such an important role these days in everybody’s life that consumers don’t for one minute stop to think about how they manage to apply deodorant in the morning, eat a bowl of cereal or buy a litre of milk. With this in mind, here are some tips to keep in mind when you’re considering what your next product’s packaging will look and feel like:

  1. When designing packaging, always design with the end in mind. Think of the full supply chain, from cradle to grave, and what the package will endure along the way. Thought should be given to shape and size at unit level so that containerisation can be maximised and overall costs reduced.
     
  2. Conditioning is essential before making tests on many materials and containers. Properties of certain materials are a function of the environmental conditions in which they find themselves. For example, the thickness, or caliper, of a piece of chipboard varies with the humidity of its environment.
     
  3. The word ‘Nylon’ is derived from ‘New York’ and ‘London’, where DuPont's research facilities were located in 1935.
     
  4. Karl Ziegler, a German chemist, developed polyethylene in 1953, and the following year Giulio Natta, an Italian chemist, developed polypropylene. These are two of today’s most commonly used plastics.
     
  5. ‘Plastic’ is used interchangeably with ‘polymer’. Usually ‘plastic’ refers to the finished formulated product, whereas the more correct word ‘polymer’ is used to describe the pure basic material.
     
  6. The word ‘polymer’ is derived from the Greek word poly meaning ‘many’, and the Greek word mer meaning ‘unit’, i.e. a polymer is a ‘many-unit’ material.
     
  7. Bakelite or polyoxybenzylmethylenglycolanhydride, is an early plastic. It is a thermosetting phenol formaldehyde resin, formed from an elimination reaction of phenol with formaldehyde. It was developed by Belgian-born chemist Leo Baekeland in New York in 1907. It is one of the first plastics made from synthetic components. It was great for electrical components like plugs.
     
  8. Cellophane looks and feels like a plastic but is not a plastic. It is a thin, transparent sheet made of regenerated cellulose. It was invented by a Swiss chemist, Jacques Brandenberger, who in 1900 was inspired by seeing a wine spill on a restaurant's tablecloth, and decided to create a cloth that could repel liquids rather than absorb them.
     
  9. We incorporate additives into plastics in order to enhance or improve their performance both during processing and in use of the resulting mouldings or films. Examples are:
    Plasticisers – these are often necessary to reduce the rigidity of some plastics so that processing is easier at a lower temperature and so that permanent flexibility can be achieved.
    Stabilisers – these protect the polymers against physical or chemical deterioration when subjected to atmosphere effects or to high temperatures during processing.
    Slip additives – these are added to films in order to reduce the corffecient of friction between two film surfaces.
     
  10. If each Australian family used one less plastic bag each week that would be we’d use 253 million fewer bags in a year.

If more of us, both inside and outside the industry, thought about packaging a little more, and thoroughly appreciated and understood its advantages and real purpose in the supply chain, as a population we’d greatly reduce wastage and packaging pollution, and go a long way towards achieving the 3 Rs: reuse, recycle and reduce.

Pierre Pienaar Msc, FAIP
Education Coordinator
Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP)
educate@aipack.com.au

 

Joint winners for 2013 AIP scholarship

Two students from the University of Technology, Sydney, have been awarded the Australian Institute of Packaging's scholarship, the first time in five years that it's been presented to joint winners.

James Bossi and Justin Chong are both "excellent examples of the quality of students undertaking design courses in Australia" said Ralph Moyle, national president of the AIP.

The AIP scholarship is awarded to one of the finalists in the Cormack Innovation Awards, but this year there are two lucky recipients.

"James Bossi demonstrated good methodology and thinking throughout the scholarship process. He displayed a clear interest and involvement in the packaging industry. He understood the importance of recycling and sustainability within packaging design development and has a real interest in solving some of the packaging problems the industry has currently been experiencing," Moyle said.

"Justin Chong is already doing Point of Sale construction and design and his mechanical skills were part of his in depth answers. He provided compelling answers to all questions and he was well-spoken and articulate."

 

Addressing packaging education in Africa

A recent trip to Nigeria showed our AIP columnist that there is so much Australia can teach the developing world when it comes to effective packaging.

Lagos, Nigeria. The destination conjures up a varietyof imaginations. I grew up in South Africa but nothing could have prepared me for the highly populated, super-resourced, bustling West African nation. A quarter of Africa's population lives in Nigeria. It is the seventh most populous country (an estimated 200 million people) in the world with 42 percent of its population zero to 14 years of age. It is the world's eighth largest exporter of petroleum.  It is a country of huge extremes and I feel privileged to have been asked to participate recently in a five day residential training program (RTP) focusing on Packaging Technology education.

The World Packaging Organisation (WPO) approached the AIP to deliver this week long training program. Thirty-four students from Nigeria, Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire, Kenya and South Africa attended; all with a strong desire to learn more in the field of the science and technology of packaging. The majority of the attendees were graduates including some with Masters qualifications and two with PhDs. But Packaging Technology is what they were hungry to learn about. No small wonder when one considers that more than 50 percent of Africa's food supply is lost through poor/ineffective/insufficient packaging. All participants keenly absorbed information and their eagerness to improve their knowledge in this field was most evident in their final project presentation on the fifth day.

This West African RTP initiative will be the first of more to come. Already the African Packaging Organisation (APO) is planning similar programs in 2014 in Accra and another in Lagos; the latter focusing on pharmaceutical packaging. Although this recent RTP covered the entire spectrum of packaging technology, what drove the students and which was evident in their questions, was how one can improve packaging and reduce costs. Participants wanted to know what their packaging counterparts were doing in developed countries and how they can improve, particularly the packaging of foodstuffs to reduce wastage.

In this region much fresh produce is sold on the ‘open markets’, where  better knowledge of material selection coupled with  more effective storage would greatly reduce the loss of fresh fruit and vegetables. Subsistence farming is the order of the day in Nigeria where the farmer brings a few baskets of produce to the market and transfers the contents to another basket belonging to the open market vendor. Fresh produce is exposed to the elements during display and sales resulting in a very limited shelf life.

There is significant evidence of informal packaging happening throughout Africa. This is where vendors buy in bulk and repack into small pack sizes for ‘open market’ sales which better suits the consumer owing to low income and poor storage facilities at home. Affordability also drives daily supply of household, hygiene items such as toothpaste where 15ml (one day dose) sachets are by far the biggest seller of toothpaste units. It is in this area of small dose packaging that most support, knowledge and advice is required.

This recent RTP has been a good start. Ongoing education is required at all levels of the packaging spectrum. The AIP, in collaboration with WPO, has the knowledge, the resources, the first world experience and the ability to share information and expertise. In fact, we have an obligation to help those in developing countries. The APO and WPO are to be commended for taking the initiative to begin addressing this most serious need in Africa. The road ahead is long and it is wide but the journey has commenced. The destination is not necessarily in sight but the rewards along the way for all involved will be big and long lasting.

Pierre Pienaar is an education coordinator at the Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP)

 

AIP celebrates 50 years in packaging

For half a century now, The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) has been serving the education and training arm of the Australian packaging industry.

AIP was founded on 12 September, 1963 by fourteen industry experts with a vision to create a packaging institute that would provide a professional identify for packaging technologists in Australia.

For 50 years, the primary function of the Institute, which is not-for-profit and based on individual- not company-membership, has been to enable professional development of its members and to disseminate technical knowledge of packaging throughout the industry via education and technical training as well as providing cross-functioning networking opportunities.

Ralph Moyle, national president of the AIP is proud of the achievements of the institute, and credits its success to a solid commitment to the exchange of knowledge, and experience amongst its members.

“AIP members come from a wide range of industry segments; some are energetic and youthful, others are more mature and knowledgeable,” says Moyle.

“Regardless of who they are and where they’ve come from, one of the AIP’s core reasons for success over its half century is the continual exchange of knowledge and sharing of experiences. Packaging is a diverse field and no person knows it all.”

Today AIP will celebrate a remarkable achievement of longevity, with the celebrations continuing into the evening at Chapter House in Melbourne tonight.

 

Packaging industry teams up with Foodbank this Xmas

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP), in conjunction with the Australian Packaging and Processing Machinery Association (APPMA) and the Supply Chain and Logistics Association of Australia (SCLAA) will this year be continuing their Foodbank Christmas Hamper project.

For the fourth consecutive year, the three industry associations work together on 6 December to pack over 600 hampers for Foodbank to distribute to those in need this Christmas.

Ken McMillan, general manager of Foodbank Queensland said, "The 600 hampers that the AIP, SCLAA and APPMA pack each year are distributed to families in crisis at Christmas time and while none of those who pack the hampers will ever meet the receivers, everyone who participates should be extremely proud of what you do."

The packing of the hampers is a culmination of 12 months of work with over $60,000 worth of goods raised to go inside the hampers. Each hamper is worth $100 and is made up of food and personal hygiene products.

In three years the AIP, the SCLAA and the APPMA have packed 1,800 hampers to the value of over $180,000. 

 

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