Calabria Family Wines buys brands

Australian winemaker Calabria Family Wines has bought three Australian wine brands –  Deakin Estate, La La Land and Azahara. The formal agreement is a brand-only sale and transfers ownership of these brands from the Wingara Wine Group, part of Henkell Freixenet, to the Calabria family.
Calabria Family Wines will now produce all of the wines across each of the brands’ portfolios from their Griffith, NSW winery as well as manage marketing across all markets. Calabria Family Wines will continue the current distribution partnership with Red & White for all three brands in Australia.
“Each of these brands brings something new to the table for the team at Calabria and we are eager to welcome them to the family as we diversify and broaden our wine offering,” third-generation general manager Michael Calabria said.
Read More: Deal activity slows
“Deakin Estate, with over 50 years of winemaking history behind it, has achieved outstanding distribution, particularly in challenging export markets where many haven’t. That can only happen with a good quality product and dedicated team behind it.
“Both La La Land and Azahara, while newer to market, are unique brands with well-established portfolios and market presence, both domestically and overseas. We look forward to relishing in La La Land’s dedication to emerging wine styles with our own Italian alternatives and celebrating Azahara’s effervescent flare and sophistication.”
Wingara Wine Group is part of Henkell Freixenet, a global market leader in sparkling wine, which was formed in January 2019 from the legacy Henkell & Co. Group and Grupo Freixenet.

Rockwell Automation improves productivity and reduces risk with the release of PlantPAx 5.0

Rockwell Automation has released the PlantPAx 5.0 distributed control system (DCS). This latest DCS version from Rockwell Automation helps industrial producers positively impact the lifecycle of their plant operations with plant-wide and scalable systems to drive digital transformation and operational excellence.
New system capabilities help digitally transform operations by introducing process functionality native to the controller, improving the availability of system assets driving compliance in regulated industries, while enabling the adoption of analytics at all levels of the enterprise. Intuitive workflows and the use of industry-leading cybersecurity standards will help teams design, deploy, and support a DCS infrastructure which reduces time-to-market and helps plants realize profit at a faster rate.
“We’re excited to bring PlantPAx DCS 5.0 to our customers,” said Jim Winter, global process director, Rockwell Automation. “New system features are step changes in helping our customers lower the overall costs to design and commission. The functionality improves the overall effort to integrate the process control layer to the enterprise. By reducing the lifecycle cost of the system and lowering operational risks, we are continuing to find innovative ways to bring more value to end users.”
Process end users desire a system that offers the benefits of a modern experience without the burdens that come with a traditional DCS. The new 5.0 release innovates the modern DCS in the following areas:

  • Reduced Footprint
    • This release introduces new process controllers and extends the Logix family with cutting-edge processing power and capacity to reduce the complexity of PlantPAx architectures. This action reduces total cost of ownership of the system throughout the lifecycle.
  • Project Consistency
    • With native process instructions embedded in the controller firmware, project teams can adopt approaches to control strategies that drive consistency for individual projects or multi-site deployments. Consistency simplifies the lifecycle management of deployed systems as teams modernize their automation infrastructure. Consistency lowers total cost of ownership (TCO).
  • Streamlined Workflows
    • PlantPAx 5.0 provides improved design and operational user experiences. Development teams will realize savings in the configuration of instrumentation, alarms and diagnostic system elements. Operators will have the extended ability to view underlying control logic in a safe and secured manner. Maintenance will have controlled view access for troubleshooting.
  • TÜV -Certified for Cybersecurity
    • To operate at peak performance and minimize cybersecurity threats, PlantPAx 5.0 system architectures are TÜV certified to the international standard ISA-99/IEC 62443-3-3 which provides guidance on the implementation of an electronically secured system.
  • Analytics Enabled
    • Process end users recognize the value of analytics as an essential strategy to realize profit in their process operations. The PlantPAx 5.0 release has purpose-built frameworks that easily connect live and historical data from the DCS into reporting and analytical tools.
    • Enables extended experiences, such as Augmented Reality, using workflows aligned with process strategies controlling plant operations.
    • Allows extensible scalable analytic packages leveraging predictive and prescriptive models for process applications such as soft sensors, anomaly detection, or model predictive control.

As producers continue their digital transformation journey, the advances from this system release will help them unlock value and reduce overall costs at all phases of the plant lifecycle. For more information about PlantPAx DCS 5.0, please visit rok.auto/plantpax.

 

Australian wine company growing export sales

While many areas of Australia’s economy are struggling under the weight of COVID, one local business is pushing forward with export growth across Europe and Canada.
Headquartered in McLaren Vale, Leconfield Wines is Australia’s oldest family-owned winemaking business. Owned by Dr Richard Hamilton and his wife, Jette, Hamilton is a fifth generation descendant of Richard Hamilton 1st who planted South Australia’s first wine producing vineyards in 1837. Leconfield Wines takes in Leconfield Wines in Coonawarra and Richard Hamilton Wines in McLaren Vale. Its brands include Leconfield, Richard Hamilton Wines and Syn Sparkling Wines.
Leconfield has a history of producing top-quality, award-winning wines. Its wines are sold across Australia, overseas and also served aboard Jetstar business class and on Great Southern Rail trains including The Ghan, Indian Pacific, Great Southern and The Overland.
“COVID has been challenging for us. As winemakers that sell our products direct to consumers through our membership and into restaurants and other hospitality outlets across the country, sales have been hit through the closure of venues.  The latest lock down in Victoria is particularly challenging,” Hamilton said.
“We have also experienced mixed results overseas with some markets including China reducing spend.
“However in the face of this, we have also risen to the challenge. We have restructured to focus on building collaborative partnerships and foster growth in other overseas markets, and these strategies are already starting to yield great results.
“Damian White has been appointed to the newly created role of Sales and Marketing Director.  He is firmly focused on expansion of our international market, alongside our valued domestic and online platform partners.  Christine Says has been appointed to the role of CFO to help manage the complexities of our burgeoning overseas markets to ensure strong growth and firm cost control.
“The recent decision by Canada to remove tariffs on the import of Australian wines has also opened up new opportunities for us too.”
Leconfield has been approved for distribution and sale in three Canadian provinces:  Ontario, New Brunswick and Quebec.
“We are extremely excited about this and are looking to augment our presence to other provinces as well,” Hamilton added.
“In addition to Canada, we have secured new opportunities in Finland and Belgium. In Belgium, we have partnered with Belgian food retailer, Delhaize, to supply a private label Coonawarra Shiraz under the name of Dalebrook Farm. We are already in talks regarding line extensions. This opportunity and various other emerging ones are really proving very positive for us moving forward.
“Our senior winemaker, Paul Gordon is doing an excellent job of creating new and exciting wines from our vineyards. His ability to craft, blend and perfect is delivering superb results for us and really bolstering our ability to continually impress the market with wonderful wines.
“Kate Mooney, our marketing and events manager, who has been with us for nearly seven years, is hard at work refreshing and developing our labels and packaging to ensure we stand out on shelves, catalogues and online sites.
“Despite the challenges we are facing here at home, we are determined to achieve growth. We’ve been through droughts, the Spanish Flu, world wards, the great depression, recessions, the GFC and now COVID.  You could say ‘we are battle hardened’ and we are not about to let a virus dampen our prospects. We are all in this together, and certainly at Leconfield Wines, we are determined to get through to the other side.
“We are very lucky.  At the end of the day, we can sit back and relax with a good drop.  One of the benefits of winemaking.”

Beer company raises money for drought-affected farming community

A new Australian Beer has launched and $2.00 from every case will be donated to the charity ‘GIVIT’ to help raise much needed funds and equipment for those living in drought-affected communities.
Brewed in Goulburn, Southern NSW by award-wining Tribe Breweries, ‘Hughie’ is a light, refreshing lager made from 100 per cent Australian-grown hops and malt and makes a great, easy-drinking thirst-quencher at the end of a long hot day.
“The name ‘Hughie’ derives from the term “Send it down Hughie” which was a common Aussie bushman’s cry for rain at the turn of the 20th century, so it’s great to see that the money raised from the sale of Hughie can go towards helping those living in drought-affected communities today,” said Billy Ryan, category manager, craft beer, Dan Murphy’s.
Since late 2018, GIVIT has spent more than $600,000 in donated relief funds to co-ordinate over 140,000 items purchased in local communities to help 12,000 people across regional NSW affected by drought conditions.
“Being able to replace a water tank, mend a fence or purchase a week’s supply of groceries at the local store can make a significant positive contribution to a family dealing with drought,” said Scott Barrett, GIVIT’s NSW Manager. He said that last year was Australia’s driest on record and although some areas have received rainfall this year, it will take much more than a few showers to make any significant difference.
“Drought affects everyone in regional communities; farmers, their businesses and their families.  It affects lives, live-stock and livelihoods.  Whole communities are impacted: local businesses dry-up because of reduced spending and the effects run deep across generations, economically, socially and emotionally.  Many of these communities are now dealing with double-whammy of drought followed by bush-fires.  It doesn’t get any tougher than that.”
With its strong agricultural roots in wool production, Hughie’s birth-place and home in Goulburn, has also seen the far-reaching impact of drought:
“Drought really affected our local agricultural community over the last few years.  It’s fantastic to be producing a drop of great-tasting Goulburn beer that is 100 per cent Australian and gives back to the community it serves,” said Anton Szpitalak, Tribe Breweries, Goulburn.

Wine company achieves 100 per cent renewable electricity

Pernod Ricard Winemakers has become the first large wine company in Australia to achieve 100 per cent renewable electricity. The commitment was achieved ahead of schedule and will ensure that all wines from the iconic Australian wine brands Jacob’s Creek, St Hugo and Wyndham Estate will be produced using electricity from renewable sources.

All of Pernod Ricard Winemakers’ Australian sites are now using renewable electricity thanks to the completion of Australia’s largest combined winery solar installation and a 10-year agreement to source renewable electricity.

Energy company AGL has installed more than 10,300 solar panels across the company’s two Barossa Valley wineries, with a predicted annual generation of 4,000 megawatt-hours, enough to power the equivalent of nearly 800 South Australian homes.

Pernod Ricard Winemakers has also become the first wine company in South Australia to be connected to both offsite wind and solar farms as a result of a landmark 10-year Virtual Generation Agreement (VGA) with wholesale electricity retailer Flow Power. The agreement means that the remainder of the business’ annual electricity requirements will be met by solar and wind.

Sustainability and responsibility is an important part of Pernod Ricard’s global strategy, with the group recently launching its 2030 sustainability and responsibility roadmap, which sets out eight ambitious goals aligned to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

Brett McKinnon, Pernod Ricard Winemakers’ Chief Operations Officer, said that the completion of the project demonstrates Pernod Ricard Winemakers’ commitment to be a leader in sustainability and responsibility.

“Pernod Ricard Winemakers is excited to be the first large wine company in Australia to produce wine using electricity sourced entirely from renewable sources, well ahead of our initial goal and other large wine companies.

“Being sustainable and responsible is an important part of our business, particularly as producers of wine – a product that takes its character from the land where it was grown. We want to minimise our impact on the communities where we operate, responding to the local climate and preserving the environment for future generations to come.

“Our journey began in 2016 with a pilot solar installation after we recognised that we had a huge opportunity across our wineries to harness the power of the sun through solar panels. Three years later, we are exceptionally proud to say that we are now sourcing all electricity from renewable sources, in alignment with our global ambition,” he said.

Pernod Ricard is the only wine and spirits company globally to be recognised by the United Nations as a Global Compact Lead, demonstrating an ongoing commitment to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and its Ten Principles for responsible business.

 

Drinks companies cut sugar by seven per cent

Australia’s largest beverage companies have marked a major milestone by announcing a 7 per cent reduction in sugar in the first progress report on the beverage industry’s flagship initiative.

The signatories to the pledge, Asahi Lifestyle Beverages, Coca-Cola Amatil, Coca-Cola Australia and PepsiCo Australia, have contributed to the reduction in sugar across their portfolios, and more drinks companies are expected to join in the future.

In June 2018, with the support of the Minister for Health, the Hon Greg Hunt MP, Australia’s non-alcoholic beverage industry committed to reduce sugar across the industry by 20 per cent by 2025.

KPMG has provided the first report on the industry’s progress towards the sugar reduction goal and today this has been shared with the Australian Government.

Geoff Parker, CEO, Australian Beverages Council, said, “This report is a further sign that the industry is serious about reducing sugar in beverages while continuing to offer greater choice of low-sugar drinks and many without any sugar at all.”

“The industry is achieving its intended sugar reduction targets and is already more than one third of the way towards reducing sugar by 20 per cent by 2025, but there’s still a lot of work ahead of us,” he said.

The Australian Government supports the non-alcoholic beverage industry’s progress towards a 20 per cent reduction in sugar by 2025 with Minister Hunt congratulating the industry on its progress in an announcement at Parliament House today.

 

“The Morrison Government supports pragmatic and appropriate action to tackle obesity, particularly through initiatives that support Australians to live healthier lives,” said Minister Hunt.

 

“The partnership between the industry and the Morrison Government is a clear sign that collaborative solutions are available to tackle the complex issue of obesity by encouraging healthy diets.”

 

The Australian Beverages Council will continue to consult widely with a range of health, industry, supplier and government stakeholders to increase understanding of the commitment.

 

Mr Parker said, “The non-alcoholic beverage industry invites other sectors to join the Australian Beverages Council in reducing sugar while continuing to support choice and understanding of healthy lifestyles,” added Mr Parker.

 

Today’s report, demonstrates the industry’s long-term commitment to reduce sugar by 20 per cent by 2025, complements a national obesity strategy, encourages all Australians to live healthier lives and reflects our contribution to combat obesity.

 

Barossa Cider awarded Best in Show

Barossa Cider Co’s Squashed Apple Cider was awarded ‘Best in Show’, ‘Best Australian Cider’ and ‘Best New World Cider’ with a score of 97 in the New World Medium Sweet Class at the 9th Australian Cider awards, held on November 8 in Melbourne.

Hosted by Cider Australia, the show promotes and rewards excellence in cider production and brings together the Australian cider community in a celebration of the cider category’s rapid advancement.

“As a family owned business, we are really proud and humbled to receive these accolades after the past 6 years of hard work,” said Oscar Bowen, co-owner and director.

“After an idea around the dinner table that lead to my brother, Hugo and me traveling Europe and the UK for some enjoyable market research, we decided on a production style inspired by best in class techniques already being used in the Australian industry combined with our family and our own wine-making experience,” said Bowen.

“Our aim when we started this business was to produce the best possible easy drinking cider that would appeal to a broad demographic using only 100 per cent real Australian apples and pears, and we are extremely proud to receive this validation of what we originally set out to achieve.”

Sunshine Sugar dips into rum market

Sunshine Sugar is a step closer to realising a vision to join the rum market, having today entered into a Heads of Agreement with the Holey Dollar Rum Distilling Company.

The Holey Dollar brand is owned by former Olympic Yachtsman and multiple World Windsurfing Champion, Stuart Gilbert.

Stuart formerly owned the iconic Inner Circle Rum brand, which he successfully relaunched in 2002. The Inner Circle rum brand was officially launched by CSR back in 1968. Whilst the rum was made at their distillery in Pyrmont, Sydney, the beginnings of this infamous Australian alcohol hails from 95 years before, when CSR established its original and the first known distillery in Australia, at the Harwood Sugar Mill on the Clarence River in the NSW Northern Rivers.

Since 2009, Stuart has been appointed as an International Spirit Panel Judge (specialising in Rum), at the International Wine and Spirit competition (IWSC) held in London each year. His Holey Dollar rum has won three Gold medals and “best in class” for each product, including World Wide Distiller of the Year, a feat no other rum company in the world has won in the 40-year history of the IWSC.

Named after the coins made by Governor Macquarie in the earliest days of Australia’s colonial history in 1813 and the first official currency of Australia, Holey Dollar rum has been described by the judging panel as “rich and full on the nose and in the mouth with spice, exotic fruit, raisin and lots of oak. Clean in all respects. Lots of treacle with some bitter caramel giving some unexpected bite. Big and full bodied with woody, spicy finish.”

CEO of Sunshine Sugar, Chris Connors said; “We are excited to have agreed to partner with Stuart Gilbert and his Holey Dollar Rum company, and look forward to working collaboratively to develop the business in providing Australians with an alternative, high-quality and world-class tasting rum that is highly awarded and locally made and owned in NSW.”

It is anticipated that a pot still plant will be built at either the Harwood or Broadwater Sugar Mill site, as part of a graduated approach to developing the partnership over a period of time.

“This is another step in our strategic development program and will join our Low GI and Caster Sugar products in a suite of alternative income streams. We have a number of other projects that are close to announcement that are all targeted at our sustainability,” said Connors.

Axereal acquires Cargills’s malt business

Axereal, France’s largest grain cooperative, has announced the acquisition of Cargill’s malt business on behalf of its subsidiary, Boortmalt.

This acquisition strengthens Axereal’s position globally, and makes Boortmalt the world’s leading player in the production of malt.

Jean-François Loiseau, President of the Axereal Group said “This acquisition meets our two strategic objectives:  Firstly, to invest in the downstream of barley to increase the value of our farmers production in France and internationally, and especially in growing markets.  Secondly, we have a long-term vision for our cooperative farmers.   This acquisition will help ensure that our trajectory is competitive. We at Axereal are leading the way for the agricultural transition with industrial innovation that provides quality food whilst respecting the environment.”

READ MORE: Barley variety honours historic brewery

Paul-Yves L’Anthoën, chief executive officer of the Axereal Group declared “This acquisition is a major step in our cooperative’s strategic plan: it allows us to diversify our sources of value, and it bolsters the group’s position in a growing sector. It also strengthens our relationship with the financial community.”

This acquisition sees Boortmalt taking over all Cargill Malt activities: 16 malthouses in 9 countries, nearly 600 employees, and with a total production capacity of 1.7 million tonnes.

This will bring the total capacity of the Boortmalt Group to three million tonnes with 27 malting plants on 5 continents making Boortmalt the world leader in the production of malt.  The headquarters of Boortmalt will remain in Antwerp, Belgium as well as the R&D centre, making the Antwerp malthouse the biggest in the world.

Yvan Schaepman, chief executive officer of Boortmalt added “Such a takeover offers us new growth prospects and will enable us to better mitigate risks, particularly those linked to climate change. It also allows us to accelerate the development of new malting barley varieties and to create new malts. With this acquisition, we are pursuing our primary ambition: to become the best Maltster in the world.”

Murray River Organics offer price increases

Murray River Organics has announced up to $200 per tonne increase in prices for third party grower dried fruit as part of their Sunraysia Grower Water Support Package for 2020 Crop.

MRG chief executive Valentina Tripp said given the severe drought conditions in Mildura and the increasing expensive price of temporary water the Company wanted to provide Sunraysia growers with certainty for the coming season.

“We recognise the impact that the ongoing drought and water is having on growers in the Mildura area and as significant grower ourselves we understand the issues they are facing. As a result, at this critical time, we have decided to initially offer up to $200 per tonne on top of last year’s pricing increases to source irrigation water for key in demand varieties. We believe this will deliver much needed confidence to our growers.”

READ MORE: Dried vine fruit industry welcomes funding

Last year Murray River Organics led the industry when the Company increased prices to third party dried vine fruit growers by up to 25 percent as part of its plan to ensure a fair return for fruit commensurate with global pricing trends.

The price increases are part of the “Growing Together” program which has been very successful for MRG, with the intake of third-party grower dried vine fruit reaching 1240 tonnes in 2019, an increase of 15% on 2018.

This was a significant achievement considering the challenging growing conditions in Sunraysia in 2019 with many growers experiencing lower yields of up to 40 per cent.
Valentina Tripp said the current water issues in Mildura are still challenging for the agriculture industry with irrigation water from the Murray costing up to $950 a megalitre nearly double the average price paid last season.

“Encouragingly, demand fundamentals for dried vine fruit remain strong, with the global fruit market experiencing growth in demand.”

MRG is the largest dried vine fruit grower in Sunraysia with over 1000 hectares planted and is part way through a major transformation and turnaround journey. It has identified significant sales growth opportunities in Asia, Europe and the USA.

MRG’s Sunraysia Grower Support Package is open to Sunraysia Dried Vine Fruit Growers who sign up prior to Friday, 29 November 2019.

MRG also commits to hold 2019 pricing for the 2020 Harvest.

Top food trends for 2020

Increased consumer interest in the stories behind their food and beverage products and their notable influence on purchasing decisions has resulted in companies increasingly paying attention to storytelling in branding strategies.

“Storytelling: Winning with Words” leads the list of Innova Market Insights’ Top Ten Trends for 2020. The top five trends for 2020 are:

  1. Storytelling: Winning with Words
    Although ingredient provenance has always been important, consumer interest in discovering the story behind their foods has risen further and increasingly influencing purchasing decisions. Consumers’ attention is piqued by opportunities to learn more about how products are produced, which promotes an understanding of product benefits and helps build all-important trust in the brand.As a result, manufacturers are increasingly focusing on ingredient provenance platforms in order to highlight the taste and quality of their products, as well as their uniqueness and sustainability efforts. Provenance platforms can communicate a whole range of messages to the consumer, including flavor/taste, processing methods, cultural and traditional backgrounds, as well as the more obvious geographical origin.

READ MORE: Consumer trends and the ‘new food world’ of 2015

  1. Plant-Based Revolution
    Plant-based innovation in food and beverages continues to flourish as a result of consumer interest in health, sustainability and ethics, which ties into the broader consumer lifestyle trend towards cleaner living. As the use of the term “plant-based” moves more into the mainstream, the industry and start-up companies in particular, are taking up the challenge to deliver more clean label meat and dairy alternatives with improved nutritional profiles.
  1. The Sustain Domain
    Consumers increasingly expect companies to invest in sustainability, with Innova Market Insights research indicating that 85% of, on average, US and UK consumers expected companies to invest in sustainability in 2019, up from 64% in 2018. In the area of food waste, upcycling is the new recycling, as companies strive to follow a zero-waste approach by creating value from by-products. Meanwhile in packaging, the focus is on using less of it, as well as developing sustainable alternatives.
  1. The Right Bite
    Stress and anxiety are key concerns in modern life as consumers manage careers, families and social lives while striving to maintain healthy lifestyles, both physically and mentally. Responses to this vary, although the majority of consumers aim to balance the benefits and costs of busy lifestyles. This, in turn, raises the demand for nutritious foods that are easy to prepare, convenient and portable.Indulgent treats play a role in relaxation and enjoyment.
  1. Tapping into Texture
    Last year’s leading trend “Discovery: the adventurous consumer” is still prominent, with consumer demand for something new and different being reflected in more product launches with textural claims. Consumers increasingly recognize the influence of texture on food and beverages, allowing a heightened sensory experience and often a greater feeling of indulgence. According to Innova Market Insights research, 45% of, on average, US and UK consumers are influenced by texture when buying food and drinks, while 68% share the opinion that textures contribute to a more interesting food and beverage experience.

The other top trends for 2020 identified by Innova Market Insights are:

  1. Macronutrient Makeover
  2. Hello Hybrids
  3. A Star is Born
  4. Eat Pretty
  5. Brand Unlimited

Handpicked Wines picks up silverware at wine awards

Handpicked Wines’ has won three trophies at the Royal Melbourne Wine Awards recognising its flagship Capella Vineyard on the Mornington Peninsula. Handpicked Wines 2017 Capella Vineyard Chardonnay won the Douglas Seabrook Trophy for Best Single Vineyard Wine, the trophy for Best Chardonnay (class 2017 and older), and the Capella Vineyard took out the Kym Ludvigsen Trophy for Viticultural Excellence. 

Director of Winemaking Peter Dillon said the trophies were a vindication of major efforts to improve the Pinot Noir and Chardonnay vineyard in Bittern, near the shores of Western Port, by focussing on soil health and vitality.

“We are seeing the rewards in so many ways – the increased energy in the vineyard is palpable, our wines are better than ever and our staff enjoy a healthy work environment and stimulating and satisfying work.

“I spend at least as much time in the vineyard as in the winery and building a strong teamwork ethic between the winemaking and vineyard teams has been key to our success.”

Karl Roberts has been Vineyard Manager at Capella Vineyard since Handpicked purchased the property in 2013, prior to that he was part of the team that planned and planted the vineyard in 2009.

“We were lucky to inherit Karl’s experience and knowledge of the property,” Dillon said. Roberts still remembers the site was horse paddocks before the vineyard was planted.

“Since our first vintage in 2013 Karl has accepted and grown with every challenge, including further study, new management practices and working cooperatively with the rest of our vineyard and winemaking teams.

“It’s been a privilege to be part of this site for more than 10 years and see it progress. It’s very satisfying to see how our use of organic principles such as inter-row crops and integrated pest management has improved the soil and reduced the need for pesticides and fungicides,” Roberts said.

Research such as soil pit analysis and a heavy emphasis on organics has guided management practices including planting of new clones, making compost teas, composting and mulching, inter-row planting, mechanical weed control, soil improvements and integrated pest management techniques.

Handpicked also owns vineyards in the Yarra Valley, Barossa Valley and Tasmania. Its 2018 Collection Tasmania Pinot Noir also picked up a gold medal at the Royal Melbourne Wine Awards, after scooping the pool at the 2019 Royal Hobart Wine Show, where it won trophies for Best Pinot Noir, Best Tasmanian Wine and Best Red Wine.

Carlsberg moves to create paper beer bottle

Carlsberg Group is trying to  create the world’s first ‘paper’ beer bottle made from sustainably sourced wood fibres that is both 100 per cent bio-based and fully recyclable.

Carlsberg has unveiled two new research prototypes of its Green Fibre Bottle, which are the first ‘paper bottles’ to contain beer. Carlsberg also announced it has been joined by other leading global companies who are united in their vision of developing sustainable packaging through the advancement of paper bottle technology.

These developments are a continuation of Carlsberg’s sustainable packaging innovation journey and a key part of its sustainability programme, Together Towards Zero, including its commitment to Zero carbon emissions at its breweries and a 30 per cent reduction in its full value chain carbon footprint by 2030.

Two new prototypes
The two new research prototypes are made from sustainably-sourced wood fibre, are fully recyclable and have an inner barrier to allow the bottles to contain beer. One prototype uses a thin recycled PET polymer film barrier, and the other a 100 per cent bio-based PEF polymer film barrier. These prototypes will be used to test the barrier technology as Carlsberg seeks a solution to achieve their ultimate ambition of a 100 per cent bio-based bottle without polymers.

READ MORE: Kelloggs tap into craft market with cornflakes beer

Myriam Shingleton, Vice President Group Development at Carlsberg Group, said: “We continue to innovate across all our packaging formats, and we are pleased with the progress we’ve made on the Green Fibre Bottle so far. While we are not completely there yet, the two prototypes are an important step towards realising our ultimate ambition of bringing this breakthrough to market. Innovation takes time and we will continue to collaborate with leading experts in order to overcome remaining technical challenges, just as we did with our plastic-reducing Snap Pack.”

New partners onboard
Carlsberg kicked off the project to develop a bottle made from sustainably sourced wood fibres, the ‘Green Fibre Bottle,’ in 2015 alongside innovation experts ecoXpac, packaging company BillerudKorsnäs, and post-doctoral researchers from the Danish Technical University, supported by Innovation Fund Denmark. These combined efforts have resulted in the emergence of Paboco, the Paper Bottle Company – a joint venture between BillerudKorsnäs and bottle manufacturing specialist Alpla.

Carlsberg will now be joined by The Coca-Cola Company, The Absolut Company and L’Oréal in a paper bottle community – launched today by Paboco. The community unites leading global companies and experts with the vision of advancing sustainable packaging, offering high-quality products while reducing their environmental impact.

Myriam Shingleton continued: “The work with our partners since 2015 on the Green Fibre Bottle illustrates that this kind of innovation can happen when we work together. We’re delighted that other like-minded companies have now joined us as part of Paboco’s paper bottle community. Partnerships such as these, ones that are united by a desire to create sustainable innovations, are the best way to bring about real change.”

“We’re driven by our constant pursuit of better, to create more sustainable packaging solutions that help people to live more sustainable lives. Sometimes that means completely rethinking how things are done – pushing the boundaries of existing technologies and overcoming technical challenges as they present themselves.”

Gittan Schiöld, interim CEO of Paboco said: “It is all about the team! We are collaborating across the value chain, sharing the risks and are united in our vision that the paper bottle will become a reality and fundamentally change this industry for good.”

A constant pursuit of better
Carlsberg’s focus on sustainable packaging innovations is not new. In 2018, the Danish brewer launched a number of packaging innovations including recycled shrink film, greener label ink and the innovative ‘Snap Pack,’ which replaces the plastic wrapping around its six-packs with a solution that instead glues cans together.

Carlsberg’s packaging improvements are part of its long-standing progress of betterment and innovation, including developing scientific breakthroughs such as pure yeast and the pH scale.

How a 1960s cartoon predicted the future of food

Sharon Natoli loves food. Which is just as well when she makes her living as an author and speaker specialising in the food and beverage industry.

At a recent event held by St.George Bank at urban farm, Cultivate, which is based in the Sydney CBD, Natoli spoke about the future of food and some of the challenges processors, retailers and manufacturers face.

Her first point was that the future – in general – is coming faster and faster. The Human Knowledge Curve has shown that in 1900 humanity’s knowledge was doubling every 100 years. In 1945, the rate was doubling every 25 years. By 1982 it was down to approximately one year. Today, it is estimated that what humans know is doubling every day, while deep learning platform IBM Watson predicts that our knowledge will double every 12 hours by 2020. What is driving this alarming rate of change?

“It is around data collection,” said Natoli. “The fact is that every day that we use our laptop, our phone, we buy things, and we click purchase things online. We use our credit cards, that’s data that is being collected all the time. Wearables, sensors – so much technology around us, and so much data to collect. The key is keeping up with the rate of knowledge that is happening in terms at which it is doubling.”

READ MORE: Federal funding announced for aquaculture development in Northern Australia

And with all these changes starting to occur, it is important that food and beverage businesses don’t get caught ‘sheep walking’ – a term that Natoli said is similar to sleep walking, except people are wandering around with their eyes open.

“We have our eyes open and we are conscious, but it is hard to see the future coming at us because we are surrounded by the status quo,” she said. “If we get caught sheep walking, then it is harder for us to innovate and keep up.”

She gives the example of French yoghurt manufacturer Yoplait, who up until 2015 was the number one brand in the United States. Over a few years it lost 33 per cent of its market share, with 23 per cent of that coming within one year. The equated to about $500 million in revenue. What happened? A rival read the future.

“Chobani came along with a better tasting yoghurt, a lower sugar yoghurt – the kind of things consumers were looking for at that time, and so they took a large chunk of that market share away.”

However, one topic that Natoli covered could have consequences for food processors – 3D printing. Back in the 1960s the cartoon television series The Jetsons had the Foodarackacycle, a device that, with the press of a button, would produce food for the family. Fifty years later, similar technology is coming to fruition with the Foodini.

“Foodini is a 3D printer that enables us to serve food, freshly printed,” said Natoli. “It is a smart kitchen appliance using 3D printing technology that enables us to personalise our food. Not only the amount, but a personalised nutritional profile of the food, and we can personalise the way that it looks.

“It is also attractive to health-conscious people because it puts food production in the hands of the consumer. You can print things like crackers, wraps and pizza bases – some of the things you would usually buy prepared from the supermarket.”

With the future fast approaching, it would be easy to put your head in the sand and say “it’s all too much”, especially as Natoli has already stated, our knowledge is almost doubling every day. However, she also said there are three “plates that need spinning” if the food and beverage manufacturers are going to keep ahead of the knowledge curve. They are: what do you need to keep? What are things that these companies need to keep up with? What do they want to create?

When she talks about what companies need to keep, it is more about their legacy, their history – it is about a company’s culture, both past, present and looking to the future.
Probably the most important of the three “spinning plates”, is keeping up with trends, something that could be argued Yoplait failed to do when it lost its market share in the US. There are lots of trends and different businesses need to keep up with them, said Natoli. She said there are three areas of macro trends that will be relevant to the food and beverage industry.

“The first is this rising rebellion,” she said. “What we are finding is that we have the means and the motivation more than ever to stand up for the things we believe in. We are seeing a power shift from organisations and institutions through to individuals. And this is being shown a Colmar Brunton’s Millennium Monitor. What they monitor is Australia’s changing social sentiment. What they have found, is we are moving from an era of conformity where we had trust in institutions and organisations, through to this rebellious era. What we are valuing is empowerment and individual responsibility and taking on change ourselves.”
This is leading some food and beverage brands to adopt a rebellious approach, such as the likes of Soul Fresh, which owns the brand The Milk Thief.

“They’re saying, ‘we’re a movement, not a corporation’. They are saying they are a disruptor of the status quo versus doing what we’ve always done,” said Natoli. “They’re focussed on creating healthier and better foods for consumers instead of focussing on delivering foods and beverages at the lowest cost possible.”

The second macro trend is the idea of getting more from less. This is around the intersection between disquiet about the state of the environment, combined with consumers concern about their personal health. It’s about growing things with less impact on the environment but also being healthy. She cites the example of Mike Lee from US-based Alpha Food Labs, who is looking at the biodiversity of the supermarket shelf. Natoli said he has flipped things on its head. Usually, when it comes to new product ideas, it is marketing or product development people who come up with new concepts and go out and tell the farmers, or the suppliers, to grow this or produce that.

“What Alpha Labs is doing is turning that around and going out to the farmers and saying, ‘what are you growing? What is good for the soil? What is in season?’ and then the company takes that and makes a product from it. It is the opposite of what we would usually do from a food production perspective,” she said. “They want people to see that these products are not just made from wheat, rice and oats, but they are made from things like lentils, fava beans and moringa powder, millet – all kinds of different grains and that is a way to introduce biodiversity into the food chain.”

The final part in the macro trend equation is the expectations that people have when it comes to what they are consuming. Natoli said they have high expectations of food producers as well as high expectations from their food.

“This is where transparency and knowing where your food comes from – who made it, what’s in it – comes in,” she said. “Also the use of technology in terms of things like augmented reality, where you can scan a barcode of a product and find out the story behind it. Also around health and wellbeing and how we can really improve it through what we eat.

“Companies like Habitoir, which is a US company that takes some of the insights around genetic testing, and develops personalised nutrition plans that meet peoples’ expectations around how food can deliver better health to them.”

Natoli also believes that even though there is a lot of automation, robotics, artificial intelligence and augmented reality creeping into the food processing and manufacturing space, there is still room for human interaction. Some companies even make it part of their marketing plan.

“Harris Farm, they often put themselves forward – like one of the brothers Tristan Harris – as commentators,” she said. “They put a face to the brand. It gives it that human element.”
And getting back to her point about the rebellious disruption going on, The Havas Media Group recently completed a survey that involved 300,000 consumer and 1,500 brands across 33 countries. What it found was that brands that are more meaningful outperform the stock market by double over a 10-year period. Being meaningful meant contributing to the collective well-being of society.

“Overall the future is coming at us quite rapidly and we don’t want to get caught sheep walking. We have to be really future ready. If we can spin those three plates together at the same time, then that is going to help us navigate in this decade of disruption. Many a false move was made by standing still, so whatever you do, just don’t stand still.

“It is really great for food businesses to have the opportunity to come together, to network, and connect, particularly over a meal. To create those social connections over food and to share their ideas and learnings.

“I think the way of the future is really about collaboration and so an event like this that St.George has put on is really beneficial for helping to do that.”

HPP technology will change the future

High Pressure Processing (HPP) has been around 30 years but has become mainstream in the last few years, and will disrupt the juice industry, according to Botanica managing director, Richard Magney.

HPP is a cold pasteurisation technique used to eliminate vegetable flora. Utilising 6000 bar of pressure (there is 37 bar of pressure in your car tyre), it destructs the DNA of vegetable flora, so they no longer survive or multiply.

Due to an absence of heat treatment, enzymes, nutrients and key minerals are not affected, and flavour is amplified.

“In the world of orange juice, it is the closest thing to eating an orange,” Magney said.

“Five years ago, Botanica fell into HPP by default. We’d been trading for 12 months as a small juice company in Bondi, and the Neil Perry culinary team asked us to supply QANTAS first and business class with fresh juice, but he had a very specific brief; no preservatives and maximum vitamin retention.

“We were challenged with a difficult task – fresh juice without compromising flavour. No heat treatment but safe to drink. We were turning over $100,000 at the time, supplying cafes and small markets.”

READ MORE: CSIRO – four new technologies for food processing

They googled and found HPP technology, which he says is considered one of the world’s fastest growing food and processing disruption aids.

“Disruption can only truly occur when both the product is superior to other products in the market and economies of scale allows for both domestic and international distribution.

“The juice world we lived in 20 years ago isn’t the juice world we live in today, and the juice world we live in today won’t be the juice world we live in in another 20 years.

“There is a generational shift occurring. It won’t be the ability to change the fruit, but the availability to change the technology that will be the catalyst for the shift.

“There are companies around the world right now with dedicated scientists and engineers working to crack the code for an inline automated juicing and HPP process, which will allow juice companies to reengineer their entire outlook on what they perceive is fresh juice, and more importantly, what consumers perceive fresh juice to really be.

“It takes the inertia of two forces to create seismic change, and this is coming in the form of consumer demand and technological innovation.

“The single goal for HPP technology manufacturers is to democratise fresh. Today, fresh is expensive. The chilled category is pricey, the ambient aisle is cheap.”

Magney said HPP technology manufacturers know that if they are to remain relevant, they need to design tech that allows fresh to be affordable and accessible to all consumers no matter what their socio-economic status.

“Billions of dollars of public and private capital around the world are being poured into this generational shift of redefining the word fresh. If we stare into the crystal ball, we’ll see a global movement into greater wellbeing.

“Millennials are smart, and so is the wave of Gen A behind them, and Gen B behind them. If I was a betting man, I’d double down on HPP as most desired form of juice and viscous food in 10 years.”

Magney said in the last five years, more companies around the world have invested in HPP technology, including Coke, Pepsi, Starbucks and Hain Celestial. Coke invested in HPP in Australia in Oct, 2018.

“Today’s millennials that are spending more money on wellness and reading packaging word for word, will be the buyers, category managers, and executives of Woolworths, Coles, Aldi and Costco in the future. Understanding today’s market is critical, but understanding the future market is power.”

Seven things you should know when exporting to China

According to Dr Mathew McDougall, CEO of Reach China and revered expert in doing business with China, Australia’s trade relationship with China is growing by the day and it includes large scale exports of resources through to everyday items which small and medium size Aussie businesses are ideally placed to provide.

“China represents a huge opportunity for Aussie SMEs,” McDougall said. “We import over $62 billion worth of goods from China and export over $93 billion dollars worth of goods and services to China.

“China has a population of nearly 1.4 billion people and their middle class is growing. They are also avid online shoppers and eager to purchase premium quality brands. They also seek out authentic Australian brands as our products are considered high quality, clean, green and produced in highly regulated environments. Our soils, air and water are seen as pure.

READ MORE: Why the Australian food industry needs Alibaba

“The key areas of export opportunity for Aussie food and beverage small businesses include:

  • Maternity, baby care products and baby food
  • Milk powders (including infant formula and adult milk powder), UHT and pasteurised milk, yoghurt, cheese and butter
  • Seafood (particularly saltwater shell fish such as oysters, crabs, lobster and abalone)
  • Fresh fruits (citrus, table grapes, cherries and mangoes) and natural fruit juice
  • Oats and other breakfast cereals
  • Chilled, frozen beef and processed foods
  • Wine and craft beer

McDougall suggests that while the idea of exporting to China may seem daunting, many Australian businesses, from mum and dad operations to larger companies have commenced the journey of exporting to China with great success.

“It is really a matter of preparing well and taking the right steps,” Dr McDougall said. He has put together seven key steps Australian businesses should follow if they want to export to China.

  1. Work with an experienced export consultant to help you in your journey. A good export consultant will assist you to work through all steps of the process
    This is essential to ensure you are making the right decisions and doing the right things. This avoids putting money in the wrong places and minimising mistakes.
  2. Ensure your product is suitable for the Chinese market and that there is a demand for your product.
    While this may seem straight forward, China is a big country with different markets. Be clear about what part of the market you are targeting and the potential for sales and growth. The more unique and high quality, the more appealing the product will be.
  3. Get to know Chinese culture
    Get to know the market to which you are seeking to export. Find out what products are doing well and why. Understand their social media platforms such as WeChat and how they engage and shop. A little research goes a long way.
  4. Grow awareness of your products in the Australian market first to build brand credibility and trust in China
    Chinese consumers buy brands based on reputation, trust and credibility. If your brand is known in Australia and has a good reputation, then the Chinese are more likely to buy your product in or from China.
  5. Build a sound online presence through a good website and social media
    Chinese consumers are very internet savvy and research products before they buy. They also rely on reviews. Having a strong online presence ensures your brand is well represented and and findable on the internet.
  6. IP and branding
    Protecting your IP is important, not only in Australia but overseas. Ensure your products are clearly branded and IP registered in Australia and that the branding has no conflicts with any existing brands known or registered in China.
  7. Be patient, flexible and scalable
    Many businesses have achieved explosive growth exporting to China, while others have found the journey a bit more slow going. Regardless, it is important to ensure that you are taking the right steps and are prepared for growth when it happens.  Sometimes strategies and tactics need to be adjusted and this is normal, the key is to be patient and committed – and be ready when things do shift quickly.

“I have helped many Australian startups and larger businesses export into China. With many, we have drawn on the Australian based Daigou sector to get the export process underway,” McDougall said.

“Daigou are Australian based Chinese who buy products and send them back to their friends, relatives and others in China. There are over 80,000 Daigou in Australia and the Daigou trade channel is growing fast helping many Australian brands to build awareness among consumers in China.

“Regardless of the strategy, the key is to ensure you have a good product to sell There are many Australian businesses with good products that are ideal for export. Hopefully we see more making the move to export. It can be a life-changing experience.”

Kelloggs taps into craft market with cornflake beer

There’s nothing better than two mates coming together over a cold one on a spring afternoon. Born out of Botany, NSW, two mates have done just that, developing a limited-edition craft beer.

In an Australian first, Kellogg’s Corn Flakes take centre stage in a craft beer collaboration with microbrewery One Drop Brewing Co. The two Botany-based businesses have come together to develop and produce the unique limited-edition Kellogg’s Corn Flakes Nitro Milkshake IPA.

Using famous Kellogg’s Corn Flakes in the beer, the Milkshake IPA is a creamy, full-bodied sweet beer with the right slice of hoppy bitterness.

Proudly brewed and canned at the Botany brewery and taproom, the Kellogg’s Corn Flakes Nitro Milkshake IPA is the perfect blend of fruity and creamy. Craft beer aficionados will be able to detect how Sabro, Citra and Simcoe hops take the lead in bitterness, without distracting from the huge hits of ripe strawberry, passionfruit, coconut and mango.

Bruno Madonna, Director of Research and Technology at Kellogg said: “We’ve always had a love of combining innovation with great tasting product at Kellogg.

“Kellogg’s Corn Flakes has been a catalyst to many amazing creations over the years so partnering with local Botany brewery, One Drop, seemed like a no brainer. This beer is a fun way to remind Aussies of the versatility of cereal.”

Nick Calder, head brewer of One Drop Brewing Co. said: “We’ve seen the craft beer market grow exponentially the past few years and we wanted to bring a fresh take to the scene. Using one of Kellogg’s best-selling cereals to produce a trendy Nitro Milkshake IPA was an amazing opportunity to create something different.”

Husband and wife duo Clay Grant and Meg Barbic, who founded One Drop Brewing Co., added: “There really is nothing like getting together with your neighbours over a cold one, and that’s exactly what we did – collaborate with our Botany neighbour Kellogg to produce a great tasting craft beer.”

The Kellogg’s Corn Flakes Nitro Milkshake IPA is brewed and canned at the One Drop headquarters in Botany and available until stock runs out.

Carlton Breweries buys Riot Wine

The keg and canned wine revolution led by Adelaide-based Riot Wine Co is gathering pace, with Carlton & United Breweries acquiring the company.

Riot Wine Co is the only company in Australia that sells wine exclusively in kegs and cans, with its range of quality wines – led by its flagship rosé – helping it to become the leader in the field.

Its innovative and disruptive model gives wine lovers a superior and more sustainable product. This has seen it land in hundreds of venues and retail stores nationwide despite only launching in 2016.

“We are incredibly excited to be joining Carlton & United Breweries. Their investment, expertise and customer relationships will help us continue our rapid expansion,” said Riot co-founder and chief winemaker Tom O’Donnell.

“We launched Riot Wine Co to start a wine revolution in Australia by getting venues and consumers to switch from bottles to steel kegs and aluminium cans,” said Riot co-founder and general manager Joe Cook. “Wine drank this way is fresher and easier plus it’s more sustainable because one keg saves roughly 23,000 bottles from entering the environment. Our kegs prevent wine oxidising and our wine has a fun and fresh taste profile, with less sulphur making it cleaner than traditional wine.”

READ MORE: Tasfoods buys Betta Milk

Riot produces high-quality wine from South Australian grapes, supporting local producers in premium wine regions. The new investment by CUB will also see Riot’s urban cellar door upgraded in the Adelaide suburb of Brompton, creating a revamped hospitality space where wine lovers can sample and enjoy Riot products and food.

The partnership continues CUB’s investment into SA and follows the building of a new Pirate Life brewery in Port Adelaide last year.

CUB sales vice president – Australia and NZ, Rose Scott said: “We are committed to being the best beverage company in Australia and expanding our portfolio to meet the evolving needs of Australian drinkers. Riot Wine Co will help us do that. Riot Wine Co is a truly innovative company and CUB shares its commitment to quality and sustainability. Its rapid expansion in just three years shows venues and retailers agree that it can deliver great things for consumers.

“We plan to accelerate the expansion of this growing business through our large on-tap network and more than 100 years of draught experience.

“The Riot Wine Co team won’t change and management will stay on to ensure the elements that have helped drive the business’ success – a focus on quality wine from grape to glass, disruption and innovation, and the quality of its people and outstanding customer relationships – remain in place.”

Food and Hotel Malaysia 2019 to showcase latest food developments

The 15th Malaysian International Exhibition of Food, Drinks, Hotel, Restaurant & Foodservice Equipment, Supplies, Services and Related Technology is all set to take place from 24 to 27 September.

Also known as Food and Hotel Malaysia 2019 (FHM 2019), the event, which aims to catalyse the development of the food and hospitality industries in Malaysia, will cover 22,000 square metres of space at the Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre with 1500 participating brands / companies from 50 countries and 10 Country/National Pavilions. The four-day mega event is expected to draw more 28,000 trade visitors related to the food and hospitality industries from around the world, cementing the country’s position as a food and beverage hub of international repute.

Packed with conference programmes, technical seminars, educational talks, cooking demonstrations and displays of various types and ranges of produce and services FHM 2019 promises to be bigger and better, compared to preceding instalments of the show.  The trade event will leverage on key tech-driven strategies, with a keen realisation that strategic acquisitions are essential to ensure that this competitive marketplace remains current.

Participants can look forward to a myriad of opportunities for growing food and hospitality businesses while enabling industry players to stay on top of changing customer needs such as keeping in touch with the next generation of food production and understanding the ever demanding preferences of millennial consumers.

“Every edition we promise a bigger and better showcase than the one before and FHM 2019 is certainly gearing up to be quite unlike any other instalments in this series which resulted in a considerable take-up of additional hall space compared to previous shows,” said Mr Gerard Leeuwenburgh, Country GM of Informa Markets Malaysia on behalf of the organisers.

“An ideal avenue for companies targeting the Malaysian market, this is the only platform that offers participants direct access to crucial buyers from the hotel, restaurant and foodservice industries, bringing them the tools to sustain and expand their businesses. Our track record certainly speaks for itself and I am pleased to say that FHM 2019 is expected to see transactions taking place over the three days estimated to be between RM1.8 billion to RM2.2 billion – more than any other instalment in this series,” he added.

Among the new features of FHM 2019 are an Agriculture Pavilion and the highly anticipated Robotic Food Zone, alluding to the adaption of new technologies which have the demonstrated ability of increasing productivity and efficiency levels in the industry.

As in previous shows, FHM 2019 will once again be held alongside Culinaire Malaysia, where the crème-de-la-crème of Malaysia’s top chefs will compete in the “Malaysian Battle of the Chefs”. Culinaire Malaysia features over 1,500 entries and an assemblage of more than 1,000 culinary professionals, showcasing a stunning display of skills and talents in various disciplines and categories.

Also being held concurrently with FHM 2019 are the high profile In4Tec Food Innovation Conferences, which will include a plethora of conferences, among them the Food Innovation Conference 2019, Persidangan Inovasi Makanan Tempatan 2019, China-Malaysia Agri Food, Visit Malaysia 2020 & Beyond Conference, Malaysian Farm to Fork & Durian Conference, Persidangan Pengusaha Makanan 2019, Wilayah Persekutuan, Food Truck Malaysia 2019 and the Food and Beverage Entrepreneurship Skills Training. The In4Tec Food Innovation Conferences are also supported by Ministry of Agriculture and Agro-based and Ministry of Federal Territories.

Other highlights which participants can look forward to at FHM 2019 are the B2B business matching sessions, a VIP Buyers hosted programme for top buyers across the ASEAN-region and live cooking demonstrations by celebrity chefs which leverages on the FHM tradition of collaborating with world-renowned chefs at previous shows.

“With its multifaceted and all-encompassing character, there will certainly be something for anyone and everyone related to the food, beverage and hospitality industries, making FHM 2019 a truly unique event in itself that is definitely not to be missed,” said Mr. Leeuwenburgh.

FHM 2019 also comes at an opportune time as the country gears up for Visit Malaysia Year 2020. In 2020 Malaysia expects to see 30 million tourist arrivals, who will spend an estimated RM100 billion. FHM 2019 therefore certainly accelerates Malaysia’s preparedness to meet these demands while promoting entrepreneurship at every level in an inclusive manner,” said Mr Leeuwenburgh.

Organised by Informa Markets, Malaysia FHM 2019 is endorsed by the Malaysia External Trade Development Corporation (MATRADE) and is supported by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Ministry of Tourism and Culture Malaysia (MOTAC), Malaysia Convention & Exhibition Bureau (MyCEB), Malaysian Association of Hotels (MAH), and The Malaysian Food & Beverage Executives Association (MFBEA).

Heineken offers drive-thru experience for alcohol-free beer

To celebrate the national launch of the brand’s first alcohol-free beer, Heineken 0.0, the company is giving beer drinkers a unique chance to enjoy ‘one for the road’ without compromising on taste or their ability to drive.

Following the premiere of the new Heineken TV commercial on Father’s Day which is part of the “Now You Can” campaign that is about transforming traditionally non-beer moments into opportunities to enjoy a beer, without the alcohol. Heineken is launching Australia’s first Beer Drive-Thru for consumers to sample the new product.

Heineken will launch the Heineken 0.0 Beer Drive-Thru at 886-896 Princes Highway, Tempe on Wednesday, 11 September to give curious consumers the chance to sample (for free) the merits of the great-tasting, alcohol-free beer.

READ MORE: GABS Hottest 100 Australian craft beers

Heineken 0.0 grants adults a beer choice appropriate for any time of the day and at more occasions which typically call for a good tasting beverage, but no alcohol, such as during your lunch break, a reward after a hard workout – or even during business meetings.

Heineken® Master Brewers applied their expertise to brew the best possible 0.0 beer using just natural ingredients. The result is a great tasting alcohol-free beer with perfectly balanced flavours, including refreshing fruity notes and a soft malty body.

“Heineken 0.0 launched globally in 2017 and is exceeding expectations in all 51 markets. In Australia, we estimate that the no alcohol beer segment will reach 22ML in 5 years, so it is a huge opportunity. What better way to launch it in market than at Australia’s first Beer Drive-Thru, which is the perfect opportunity to introduce Heineken 0.0 to places it has never been before,” said Damian Dabkowski, Heineken country manager, Australia.

Following the launch in Sydney, Heineken will be taking its Heineken 0.0 ‘One for the Road Bar’ on a tour across Australia. Stay tuned.