The Australian wine scene is evolving and the world is watching

On the eve of the annual KPMG Sydney Royal Wine Show awards, this year’s invited international judge, Master of Wine, Mark Pygott says he likes what he sees in the evolution of Australian wine – and only not from the usual suspects.

Mark Pygott was invited this year to join 30 Australian wine experts in tasting and judging more than 2100 entries across four days at the KPMG Sydney Royal Wine Show at Sydney Showground.

 Mr Pygott, originally from Northern England but these days director of Sniff Wine Ltd in Taiwan by way of lengthy winemaking stints with respected French wineries, became a Master of Wine after completing a research paper on climate change and adaptive viticultural practices in the Barossa Valley.

Mark Pygott says he also has seen firsthand the changing views on Australian wine, from what he says began as “friendly, approachable, fruit-forward, cheaper ‘sunshine in a glass’ offerings to places like the UK and the US, to the extremely high quality product the wine drinking world (including newer markets like China) know the Australian wine sector for today.

“The quality of the Grenache and some of the Semillon I have seen in judging this past week has been outstanding,” he said.

 “Not just very good wines – world class wines.

 “If I said I have tasted some great Shiraz, everyone would say ‘of course’,” he added.

 “A wine has made me cry, it happens maybe once every two years.

 While not revealing whether any of the reds, whites, sparklings and fortified entries this year made Mark well up during this year’s competition, he says he likes the fact the Australian wine sector is always testing itself and striving to improve.

 “I think you have to be very careful about thinking that what you have is the best, because if you stand still, other people won’t and that’s dangerous.”

 “You must keep on looking for the next best thing,” he said.

 Mark Pygott was also highly complimentary of the standard of the judging panel assembled for this year’s KPMG Sydney Wine Show.

 “You look around the room at the quality of not just the Judges, but Associate (invited trainee) Judges and there are some serious people here, people who have huge amounts of experience, hugely qualified and here to get a better picture of wine in Australia.

 The KPMG Sydney Wine Show culminates this week in the Awards Night on Thursday, July 27th, a trade day on Friday the 28th and the grand finale, the Sydney Royal Wine Experience this coming Saturday, July 29th, when members of the public are invited and encouraged to taste the very same premium Australian wines the Judges assessed just last week.

 

Automated food sorting machines to grow at seven per cent CAGR by 2021

Technavio market research analysts forecast the global automated food sorting machines market to grow at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of close to seven per cent during the forecast period, according to their latest report.

The research company’s analysts highlight the following three market drivers that are contributing to the growth of the global automated food sorting machines market:

  • Retrofit activities carried out in aging food processing facilities
  • Rising demand for food products and shorter delivery cycle
  • Implementation of standards applicable to food processing

The food industry is the oldest industry that has gone through several revolutions such as Green Revolution, White Revolution, and Pink Revolution. Depending on the type of food products manufactured, there have been several changes in the methods of food processing witnessed in the industry. However, the introduction of automation in the industry is transforming the aging industry by integrating new methods and technique, according to Technavio.

“Automation has allowed the industry to reduce the manual work, improve hygiene, and speed-up the process. Also, realising the cost benefits achieved in terms of return-on-investment in the long run, small and medium-sized enterprises too have switched to automated machines to optimise industry operations,” says Sushmit Chakraborty, a lead analyst at Technavio for automation research.

Rising demand for food products and shorter delivery cycle

The improving economy of developing nations has witnessed a rise in the demand for different food products and changes in eating habits. To serve the growing need for food, the food industry is required to reduce the process time and delivery time. This can be achieved by reducing the process cycle time and implementation of automated machines.

Implementation of automated machines has drastically reduced the process time and increased the quality of food products manufactured. The demand for various food products such as dairy, fruits and vegetables, oils and fats, and meat and seafood can be fulfilled by integrating the processes that require minimum process and cycle time.

“Automated food sorting machines are used for different food items, thus making the processes faster and more hygienic. Industrial automation and information analytics allow the user to extract the data and perform the activities more accurately and fast, thereby reducing the delivery cycle,” says Sushmit.

Implementation of standards applicable to food processing

The food industry must adhere to food and safety standards that regulate and monitor the food quality. For every food product manufactured, there are a set of quality standards that are to be maintained during the manufacturing process. Traditionally, food industry involved manual efforts during the manufacturing processes. However, to achieve the quality standards decided by food safety and standard authority, it is necessary for food manufacturing companies to rely on food processing equipment.

Automated food sorting machines provide speed and allow the industry to optimise the quality standards. The improved quality achieved by implementing automated machines and integrating methods with artificial intelligence will result in the further growth of the market.

Image: BBC Technologies’ CURO 16

CSIRO maps out Australia’s food future

New technologies could see us eating algae-based sources of protein, developing allergenic-free nuts and tolerable varieties of lactose and gluten, and reducing environmental impact through edible packaging.

Speaking at the launch during the Australian Institute of Food Science and Technology’s (AIFST) 50th Anniversary Convention in Sydney, Assistant Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science, Craig Laundy , highlighted the importance of innovation and entrepreneurship in driving new economic growth in the industry.

Keeping a greater share of food processing onshore and better differentiating Australian food products are major themes across the Roadmap, which calls on businesses to act quickly or risk losing future revenue streams to the competitive global market.

Developed with widespread industry consultation and analysis, the Roadmap seeks to assist Australian food and agribusinesses with the desire to pursue growth and new markets.

Deputy Director of CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Dr Martin Cole said Australia was well positioned to act as a delicatessen of high-quality products that meet the needs of millions of informed and discerning customers both here and abroad.

“Australian businesses are among the most innovative in the world, and together with our world-class scientists, can deliver growth in the food and agribusiness sector amid unprecedented global change,” Dr Cole said.

“Less predictable growing conditions, increasingly global value chains and customers who demand healthier, more convenient and traceable foods are driving businesses to new ways of operating.

“Advances are already being made through the use of blockchain technology and the development of labels that change colour with temperature or time, or are programmed to release preservatives.

The Roadmap was developed in collaboration with the government-funded food and agribusiness growth centre: Food Innovation Australia Limited (FIAL).

Recently, FIAL launched their Sector Competitiveness Plan, which outlines the over-arching industry vision to grow the share of Australian food in the global marketplace and the necessary strategy to achieve the vision.

“With the growing Asian middle class, Australia is in the box seat to take advantage of the many emerging export opportunities,” FIAL Chairman Peter Schutz said.

“Consumers are looking for differentiated products that cater to their needs.

“This is especially exciting for Australian food and agribusinesses which have the capability to respond with customised and niche products.”

Currently, Australia exports over $40 billion worth of food and beverages each year with 63 per cent headed for Asia.

Dr Cole explained that Australia is a trusted supplier of sustainable, authentic, healthy, high quality and consistent products.

“We must focus on these strengths and enhance the level of value-adding to our products,” DrCole said.

“Recent Austrade analysis shows early signs of such a shift, as for the first time in Australia’s history value-added foods have accounted for the majority (60 per cent) of food export growth.”

The Roadmap outlines value-adding opportunities for Australian products in key growth areas, including health and wellbeing, premium convenience foods and sustainability-driven products that reduce waste or use less resources.

Five key enablers for these opportunities are explored in the Roadmap: traceability and provenance, food safety and biosecurity, market intelligence and access, collaboration and knowledge sharing, and skills.

These enablers align with FIAL’s knowledge priority areas that are central in helping the food and agribusiness industry achieve its vision and deliver increased productivity, sustainable economic growth, job creation, and investment attraction for the sector.

The Roadmap calls for improved collaboration and knowledge sharing to generate scale, efficiency and agility across rapidly changing value chains and markets.

“To survive and grow, the challenge facing Australia’s 177,000 businesses in the food and agribusiness sector is to identify new products, services and business models that arise from the emerging needs of tomorrow’s global customers,” Dr Cole said.

Compact labeler for craft breweries and spirits bottlers

With the Innoket Roland 40 the KHS Group is launching a compact labeler to market. The machine will be premiered at this year’s drinktec trade show in Munich, Germany.

The KHS Innoket Neo’s little brother has a capacity of 2,500 to 25,000 bottles per hour and is thus specifically tailored to the requirements of craft breweries and spirits bottlers. The Innoket Roland 40 can be fitted with various labeling stations and is characterized by its ease of use and the accustomed high standard of quality offered by KHS.

“The new machine is specially geared towards lines with a smaller output,” explained Cornelius Adolf, labeling product manager at KHS. During development particular attention was paid to simple operation and a high degree of economy. The table machine is not only of interest to craft breweries but also to companies in the food and non-food industries, such as manufacturers of canned food, pet food or shampoo.

In its standard version the Innoket Roland 40 comes with two cold glue stations. This allows shoulder and neck labels to be applied at two levels by the first station, for instance, with the second station affixing back labels to the bottles. Alternatively, self-adhesive stations, a combination of cold glue and self-adhesive technology and hot melt labeling processes can be used.

Proven components from the high-capacity range

Inside the Innoket Roland 40 are countless quality-determining components taken from the established high-performance KHS Innoket Neo labeling machine. These include the carousel, infeed and discharge stars, folding doors, installation and format parts and guides and on the cold glue station the gripper cylinder and label magazine. The servo feed screw found on the Innoket Neo has also been applied and integrated here, permitting gentle bottle stops.

Plenty of upwards scope

The new KHS development also provides many different opportunities for extension, enabling individual labeling tasks to be realized. It is possible, for example, to equip the Innoket Roland 40 with the KHS VarioDrive electronic bottle plate control system.

Other options include mechanical alignment by side or base notch or swing-top closure in the infeed star and the fitting of traveling applicators, the latter used for cap or lid labels. L- and U-shaped labels – such as for the tax revenue stamps on spirits bottles – can also be labeled and rolled on.

Optional sensors check for the presence of labels at certain points, for example in the label magazine or on the gluing roller, and for other factors such as broken bottles. With its many expansion options the KHS Innoket Roland 40 is thus perfectly suited to cater for all requirements in the small capacity range.

 

Health benefits of tea revealed

There is now even more reason to enjoy a cup of tea with a new review of existing research showing the humble cuppa can help prevent a number of diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes.

Researchers from Edith Cowan University’s School of Medical and Health Sciences examined more than 100 studies from around the world that have looked at tea consumption.

They found that black, white and green tea can reduce the risk factors associated with Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes.

The findings could offer some hope to the more than 65 million people expected to be living with Alzheimer’s disease by 2030.

Likewise, some 5.1 million deaths worldwide were attributed to diabetes in 2013, a figure that is growing annually.

Flavonoids key

ECU Centre for Excellence for Alzheimer’s Disease Research and Care Research Fellow Dr Fernando said the review offered new lines of enquiry for scientists.

“There is strong evidence that tea consumption can lower the levels of beta amyloid b (Aβ) in the brain, the build-up of which can cause Alzheimer’s disease,” she said.

“In particular a number of studies have found that the flavonoid Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which is found in tea, can reduce the levels of Aβ in the brain, which could delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease,” she said.

Diabetes risk down

The researchers also examined the evidence that tea consumption could be protective against diabetes.

“Both population-based studies as well as human clinical trials have shown a link between tea consumption and a reduced risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes,” Dr Binosha said.

“One study found that drinking tea could result in a significant reduction in the symptoms of diabetes, including a 15-fold increase in insulin activity. Low insulin activity is a major risk factor for diabetes. ”

Next steps

“Overall, tea appears to offer a safe and acceptable approach toward lowering the risk factors associated with diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease,” Dr Fernando said.

“What is needed now is more randomised, clinical trials which are placebo controlled using standardised doses to determine exactly the manner, type and amount of tea required to achieve these beneficial results.”

Lifestyle factors

ECU’s Centre for Excellence for Alzheimer’s disease Research and Care has also recently identified depression and trouble sleeping as potential risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease.

The Centre is also currently investigating if a combination of the spice circimun and fish oil can potentially delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

‘Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease: Can Tea Phytochemicals Play a Role in Prevention?’ was recently published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

 

China and US drive increased demand for Australian wine

The Wine Australia Export Report June 2017, released today, shows that Australian wine export value increased by $201 million (10 per cent) in 2016–17 to $2.31 billion, underpinned by strong export growth to China and the United States of America (US).

Australia is the world’s fifth biggest exporter of wine – behind France, Italy, Spain and Chile. In 2016–17, Australia outperformed each of the four larger exporters in its rate of export growth.

Wine Australia Chief Executive Officer Andreas Clark said, “Pleasingly, nearly all price points experienced growth and there were benefits for exporters in all segments of the market.

“The strongest growth was in more premium wines, with all price segments of $10 per litre FOB and above experiencing growth, and the strongest rate of growth for wines $30–49.99 per litre FOB.

“There were a record 1997 exporters last financial year and 69 per cent contributed to the total increase in value shown.

“An interesting development from last year was the growth in the carbonated wine category, which includes varieties such as Moscato. Exports more than doubled to $30 million. The United States was the destination for 35 per cent of the carbonated wine exports, with mainland China (15 per cent) and Japan (14 per cent) the other major destinations,” he said.

Handpicked Wines Export Director James Hunt, said the company’s success in Asia came through hard work and ensuring brand equity across the region while also recognising that each market and its culture was unique.

“This is built on the back of tight brand guidelines, frequent market visits, engaged activity and communication with all levels of the distribution chain. In particular, the importers and distributors are educated to manage the message and value chain through to the consumers,” he said.

“As the business grew we found the need to employ within the region to maintain the brand values and ensure the message was consistent across the region, particularly with local websites, trade material and social media accounts.” Hunt said.

 

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Schweppes unveils new bottle design and updated flavours

Beverage maker Schweppes, has revealed its biggest change to bottle design in over a decade.

The new bottle shape pays homage to Schweppes’ famous ‘Hamilton’ bottle of 1809.

The PET bottle design will see a reduction in bottle size from 1.25 litres to 1.1 litres across Schweppes’ mixer and flavoured mineral water ranges.

The recommended retail price per bottle will also reduce.

Other changes include updating the flavoured mineral water range to be more in line with consumer expectations: less sugar, less sweet, and more natural flavour profiles.

“Schweppes’ new bottle design is elegant, thoughtful and contemporary,” said Lisa Saunders, Schweppes General Manager Marketing.

“Our bottle shape is a visible reflection of our brand. With a new, more premium bottle design we hope to create a stronger connection with the experience of drinking our quality products.”

The move to a more contemporary bottle design is part of Schweppes’ wider strategy to ensure it remains relevant to discerning consumers of adult beverages.

“By leveraging the heritage of the famous Schweppes ‘Hamilton’ design from 1809 – an innovation in sparkling beverages all those years ago – it places us in a more premium market,” Saunders said.

“The new bottle design applies to the Schweppes mixer and the mineral water ranges, while only the flavoured mineral water range has been updated with new flavours.”

Saunders said the flavoured mineral water range had been reinvigorated to address changing consumer tastes and trends, including reduced sugar content, while still producing a great tasting product.

The reinvigorated flavoured mineral water range will be rolled out in-store from 10th July 2017. It will include three new flavours:

  • Blood Orange and Passionfruit
  • Apple and Cranberry
  • Pineapple and Lemon

Schweppes infused and natural mineral water will also move to the new 1.1 litre bottle without any liquid changes.

Entries open for 38th Sydney International Wine Competition

The 38th Sydney International Wine Competition – the only international wine show that judges all its finalists in combination with appropriate food – has opened for entry.

Entries are eligible from wine producers from around the world, with entries capped at a total of 2000 wines to ensure the most rigorous judging process.

Last year’s Competition attracted the most diverse range of entries in the competition’s history, with wines entered from 13 countries, representing over 100 different grape varieties.

Wineries have till 15 September to enter the competition, with judging to take place from 9 – 13 October, and provisional award and trophy winners will be notified by the end of October.

Online entries can be made via the competition’s website www.top100wines.com, which contains full details of the judging criteria and judges’ comments on all award winners from the 2017 competition.

With no minimum production requirements, this show is particularly applicable to experimental and small makers to test their wines alongside wines from major producers.

This year’s competition will be judged by an international panel of fourteen highly experienced and credentialed judges which includes five Masters of Wine, with Kym Milne MW returning as Chair of the judging panel.

New judges to the competition are Mike DeGaris, Corey Ryan, Natasha Hughes MW, Matthew Deller MW and Tan Ying Hsien MW, who qualified as Singapore’s first-ever Master of Wine in 2015.

They join returning judges Kym Milne MW, Stuart Halliday, Sue Bastian, Warren Gibson, Brent Mariss, Ken Dobler, Meg Brodtmann MW and Oliver Masters.

Renowned Chef Michael Manners will once again develop menus for the final rounds when wines are tasted “with appropriate food”.

Competition Director of the Sydney International Wine Competition, Brett Ling, said the Competition continued to attract national and international attention because of the relevance of the judging process to consumer tastes.

“Recent Competition results have shown that some of the best performing wines are also amongst the best-value wines, reflecting the industry’s move towards food friendly wines of balance and harmony at all price points,” said Ling.

“For most consumers, wine is best enjoyed with food, and so judging wines with food, in the right environment, is the best way to ensure that wine show awards are relevant for consumers. Warren Mason founded the Sydney International Wine Competition on that premise, and the tradition continues under our long-standing Chairman of Judges, Kym Milne.”

Owner denies closure of iconic XXXX brewery

Japanese beverage company Lion has denied claims that the XXXX Brisbane brewery will be closing, following reports that the facility would be shut due to pay disputes.

Lion spokesperson Dan Holland has assured that the brewery will not be closing and is in fact looking to hire five more people.

“There are no job losses or changes,” he said in a statement, adding that the company was “actually hiring five more permanent people”, not firing workers.

“In fact, there will be pay offers on the table – on top of the best pay and work conditions in brewing in Queensland,” said Holland.

However, United Voice coordinator Damien Davies claimed workers at the Castlemaine Perkins brewery in Milton had received threats that the plant would close if negotiations to eliminate full-time jobs in favour of labour-hire, part-time and casual positions were not successful.

Referring to the five new positions which Lion has claimed to be hiring for, Davies has alleged that these are part-time positions which will replace full-time roles. He has called upon Lion to put its claims in writing and commit to full-time jobs in its Queensland brewery.

Nespresso relaunches ‘Tribute to Milano’

This month, Nespresso has taken inspiration from the bustling Italian coffee culture of Milan to relaunch one of its most loved Grand Cru, Tribute to Milano. Responding to Australian’s love of intense coffee, the product is available as a limited edition.

Tribute to Milano is a reflection of the rich history and culture that Milan offers. In the hustle and bustle of the affluent Northern Italian city, coffee is usually enjoyed intense and at a fast pace whilst standing at the bar, complementing the intense Milanese way of life.

To honour this, Nespresso Coffee Experts have re-created a delicate blend of Arabica and Robusta beans that results in a delightful balance between fine fruity aromas and sweet cereal notes.

Mitch Monaghan, Nespresso Coffee Ambassador, explained: “We know that Australians have a love for a more intense coffee and discovering new coffee cultures through our Limited Edition Grands Crus. Originally launched in 2015, bringing back the Limited Edition Tribute to Milano is our way of showing our customers we know what they love.”

The Limited Edition Grand Cru has a mild bitterness and acidity with a rounded body and high intensity. Let this delightful Ristretto immerse you into the atmosphere of this enchanting Italian city.

 

Indigenous beverage company launches Wattleseed Lager

Beer made with seeds from Australia’s floral emblem will be launched as the second product of an indigenous beverage company following the release of its green ant gin earlier this year.

Something Wild Beverages will officially release its Wattleseed Lager at an event in Darwin on July 4. The beer has been brewed in the Adelaide Hills in partnership with Mismatch Brewing Company.

The wattleseed is roasted and milled before being added to the brew towards the end of the mash.

Adding wattleseed to brews is not new, with other examples including Woolshed Brewery’s Judas the Dark from South Australia and the Coca-Cola owned Aus Beer Co’s Wattle Seed Ale.

Mismatch Brewing works in collaboration with Adelaide Hills Distillery and Hills Cider Company. The group’s Toby Kline said a few kegs of the Wattleseed Lager were already being poured at craft beer bars in Sydney.

He said wattleseed’s subtle nutty aroma and hints of chocolate and coffee when roasted were well suited to the brewing process.

“It’s a really crisp, clean lager with some secondary characteristics of honey and toasted peanuts on the back end,” he said.

“There’s a lot of interest in it but it’s very early days for the product.

“It’s currently a tap offer only but we’ll be going to a packaged format soon.”

Wattleseed has been part of the diet of indigenous Australians for thousands of years and was traditionally ground into a flour.

Adelaide-based Something Wild Beverages is a division of native food company Something Wild Australia, which specialises in sustainably sourced indigenous foods such as kangaroo, wallaby, magpie goose, native herbs and fruits.

Something Wild is majority owned by famous Northern Territory Australian rules football family the Motlops and is committed to promoting the ethical, sustainable and permitted use of native Australian ingredients.

The Wattleseed Lager launch at Skycity Darwin on July 4 will coincide with the Northern Territory launch of Something Wild Beverages.

“As an Indigenous-owned company it’s great to be able to come home and show people how we’re shaking up the Australian food and beverage industry,” said Managing Director and part-owner Daniel Motlop.

“By working with traditional land-owners we can create opportunities and outcomes for the Indigenous communities who not only harvest products, but also hold a wealth of knowledge about how to use them.”

Something Wild Beverages teamed up with Adelaide Hills Distillery in February to launch Australian Green Ant Gin, which features a “pinch” of green ants in each bottle in the same way worms are used in tequila to provide the finishing touch.

Mismatch brews out of the same facility as Adelaide Hills Distillery and Kline said more Something Wild beverages were on the way.

“If we can get them out before the end of the year that would be good but the demand for the Green Ant Gin has been quite high and hopefully the lager will go quite well,” he said.

“The satisfying thing about the gin is that most people said it was going to be a gimmick but the actual liquid inside the bottle is of such a high quality that it is ensuring it keeps going and we have also have that commitment to sourcing native botanicals using the permit system.

“Mismatch Brewing and Adelaide Hills Distillery are soon to commission their new plant so we should have plenty of capacity to start playing and creating some more beverages then.”

wattleseed

Automation and craft beer making

In recent years the craft beer industry has grown to become a competitive $160m industry, with brewers now turning their attention to exports.

When an industry gets competitive, players look around for ways to grow and get ahead of the competition. Automation can play a major role in lifting production and increasing profits for the brewers in this segment.

According to Mark Emmett, Managing Director of HMPS, craft brewers have traditionally been sceptical about automation and weary of the costs. “The fact remains craft beer is a labour of love and automation means more distance between the brewer and his beer” he said.

However, to grow market share and remain competitive, automation needs to be considered.

While it is seldom that any craft brewer would go all out on automation in one go, the stages need to be investigated and engaged. HMPS specialises in packaging and understands that a craft brewer is a different breed of customer all together. A noticeable trend is to start small with bottling conveyers and capping machines and work up to case packer and palletisers.

The degree of automation often depends on the size of the craft brewery.

For all sizes, consistency is a primary goal. Fewer brewers always leads to higher consistency because there’s less chance for human error. In smaller breweries, consistency comes with the nature of the job as a limited number of refined experts have control over the process. But as breweries grow, automation enters the picture to maintain this consistency and reduce how many hands touch the product.

“The ideal is that we grow the automation as the business grows. We are very happy to meet with craft brewers and provide automation advice by doing a study of their current production facilities. We would be able to provide them with output speeds and productivity improvement figures so that they are able to measure the level of profitability they may achieve using various case scenarios” said Emmett (pictured).

HMPS is able to repurpose old machines, integrate existing machines into new systems and sometimes even sell old machines. The company specialises in bespoke solutions so the automation is scalable according to the customer’s requirements. Furthermore, they offer maintenance on machinery, even if it is not their own product.

“The planning phase has become longer because machines need to have the longevity to cope with consumer demands and future growth. For example, a brewer may be packing bottles today but when they move into an export market they may need to change over to cans,” said Emmett.

“And then we understand that whether it is a bottle or a can, there are various sizes and packaging materials and configurations to consider. We spend more time with the customer working out the various scenarios and possible configurations, and designing to accommodate these.

“Consumers are driving manufacturing. Manufacturers are responding to consumer demands at a more rapid pace, and machines need to keep up with these changing demands.”

HMPS is a wholly owned Australian company which specialises in the design, development and manufacturing of high quality machinery for packaging processes. The company serves customers across all industries.

Starting out as a result of the key wine industry in South Australia, the company designed and developed the first Bag in Box machinery back in the eighties and has since grown to offer case packers, RSC, palletisers, carton erectors and sealers, pick and place applications and specialised robotic solutions.

HMPS can offer innovative and specialised machinery which has been adapted to the client’s unique requirements.

“Through our extensive experience in the design and manufacturing of packaging machinery, not just for the locally but also the international market, we are able to advise customers on tried and tested methods to ensure the smooth operation of their business,” said Emmett.

HMPS will be exhibiting at the CBIA Craft Brewers Conference in the Adelaide Convention Centre from 25 – 27 July 2017.

 

Chia ‘super juice’ launching in Australia

This month, New Zealand made nutrient-rich beverage Chia, is officially launching in Australia.

Using Australian grown chia seeds and real fruit from New Zealand, the juice combines the best cross-Tasman ingredients to pack a powerful and nourishing punch for the body and mind.

The first chia beverage in Australia, CHIA is 100 per cent natural and free of gluten, refined sugar and preservatives. Originally designed as an endurance and recovery drink for athletes, it is recommended for athletes, parents, children, professionals and the health conscious alike.

“CHIA was born out of my desire to design a delicious, nourishing beverage that has real ingredients and real benefits. The chia seed is well known for its super food qualities when hydrated, and I wanted to bring this to life through the CHIA drinks,” said founder Chloe Van Dyke.

Rich in omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants, fibre, iron, calcium, protein and magnesium, the hydrated chia seeds in CHIA are proven to help our body absorb all the goodness chia seeds have to offer. When soaked, chia seeds activate, maximising its benefits – keeping you fuller and hydrated for longer.

 

Increasing the appeal of dairy-free drinks

DuPont Nutrition & Health (DuPont) announces that it has made it easier for beverage manufacturers to produce stable soy, almond and other plant-based drinks with a refreshing texture and a clean label. Utilising a new ingredient in the DuPont Danisco range, manufacturers can obtain all the functionality they need without mixing in other additives.

The gelling ingredient is Grindsted Gellan MAS 100 – otherwise known as gellan gum – and is the label-friendly stabiliser for non-dairy beverages made with pulses, grains, nuts and plant-derived protein. Previously produced by DuPont for ingredient systems, it is now available as a single ingredient for the first time.

“The main driver is the demand for dairy-free drinks for lactose-intolerant consumers. According to the latest market intelligence, close to 25% of European consumers are reducing or avoiding dairy products in their diet for health reasons,” says Jean-Baptiste Dufeu, DuPont global product manager. “Our ingredient enables manufacturers to respond to this trend by stabilising particles in plant-based beverages and creating a refreshingly smooth texture. Consumers experience a refreshing drink with an authentic flavour profile.”

Market analysts at Euromonitor and Innova Market Insights have registered an explosion in sales of plant-based drinks. In 2016, sales in Western Europe alone reached $1.5 billion. Soy beverages accounted for around $1 billion of those sales – a dominant position that is now being challenged by the rise of drinks based on rice, almond and oats.

Gellan gum provides reliable stabilising functionality with a low cost in use, regardless of raw material fluctuations. No other additives are required – supporting the consumer preference for clean-label, plant-based drinks that are free of artificial ingredients.

Gellan gum is the latest addition to the broad DuPont Danisco range of texturants, which is backed by strong expertise in optimising the texture, taste and appearance of specific food and beverage applications.

 

Challenging perceptions of Australian wine in Japan

Japan’s first Master of Wine Kenichi Ohashi shared his enthusiasm for the ‘New Australia’ with influential trade and media in Tokyo at a sold-out Wine Australia master class on 23 May.

The dynamic New Australia master class and networking event made a pivotal statement in one of Australian wine’s key markets, presenting new and unexpected elements of Australian wine to challenge perceptions and build enthusiasm for all Australian wine.

Last year, as a guest of Wine Australia, Kenichi Ohashi MW explored first-hand the new trends in Australian wine and met with Australian wine figures. His experience inspired him to convey the vision, dynamism and creativity of Australia’s wine community back to the Japanese wine trade.

“My visit to Australia last December was an eye-opening experience, which excited me but also humbled me about the need to always keep up with the fast changes that occur with Australian wine, said Kenichi Ohashi MW.

“I led the New Australia master class based on my convictions that understanding Australian wine is key for Japan’s wine professional community to become more international – a transition which many of us in Japan feel we need to achieve rather quickly.”

The New Australia master class was Wine Australia’s first paid-admission trade event in Japan and was sold-out with 100 wine trade and media guests in attendance.

The wines presented at the New Australia master class:

  • Clonakilla Canberra District Riesling 2008
  • Express Winemakers Great Southern Tempranillo 2016
  • Jauma McLaren Vale Pet Nat Chenin 2016
  • Jilly ‘Big Cats’ New England Touriga blend 2016
  • Koerner ‘Rolle’ Clare Valley Vermentino 2016
  • Mayer Yarra Valley Cabernet 2016
  • Rockford ‘Basket Press’ Barossa Valley Shiraz 2010
  • Swinging Bridge ‘#003 by Tom Ward’ Orange 2016
  • Thomas Wines Cellar Reserve ‘Braemore’ Hunter Valley Semillon 2010
  • Tolpuddle Vineyard Tasmania Pinot Noir 2015
  • Vasse Felix ‘Heytesbury’ Margaret River Chardonnay 2014
  • Yarra Yering Yarra Valley Pinot Noir 2015

Coca-Cola No Sugar launched in Aus

Coca-Cola has today launched the new Coca-Cola No Sugar in Australia after more than five years of research, recipe mixing and flavour trials.

Developed by a team of experts at the company’s US headquarters, the product has been designed to taste as similar to the original Coca-Cola Classic as possible.

“We wanted the experience of drinking Coca-Cola No Sugar to be as close as possible to ‘The Real Thing’,” said Roberto Mercadé, President of Coca-Cola in Australia. “That’s no small task when you consider the original has been cherished by consumers for more than a century.”

“Faced with this challenge, our team of taste experts spent five years mixing different flavours and conducting 18 separate consumer trials before finally cracking it.

Mercadé said it is the product of years of research and marks the latest step in the evolution of sugar-free Coca-Cola recipes that began with Diet Coke in 1982.

The Australian and New Zealand launch follows its debut in Mexico last year where the consumer response to the great new taste has been overwhelmingly positive.

The global rollout of Coca-Cola No Sugar will be the biggest launch of a new Coca-Cola since Coke Zero was introduced over a decade ago in 2006.  It will continue to rollout in other markets from later this year.

The product will be available nationally from June 16, 2017 in all major and independent retailers.

 

Labelling plays significant role in wine choice – research

Research by the University of Adelaide has shown that consumers are much more influenced by wine label descriptions than previously thought.

A consumer study by wine researchers at the University’s School of Agriculture, Food and Wine has shown that far more than just influencing consumer choice, wine descriptions can alter consumer emotions, increase their wine liking and encourage them to pay more for a bottle. The study has been published in the journal Food Research International.

“Choosing the right wine at the point of sale whether in a wine store, in a restaurant or online can be a difficult task,” says project leader Associate Professor Sue Bastian.

“The importance of wine labels and label information has been widely studied and it’s been clearly shown that they represent useful information which influences consumer choice. Our study extends these findings, showing that wine descriptions also influence our whole wine consumption experience.”

“Cleverly written wine and producer descriptions when coupled with unbranded wine tasting can evoke more positive emotions, increasing our positive perception of the wine, our estimation of its quality and the amount we would be willing to pay for it.”

The researchers conducted a study with Australian white wines and 126 regular white wine consumers. The consumersevaluated the same set of three commercially available white wines (Chardonnay, Riesling and Sauvignon Blanc) under three information levels: a blind tasting with no information; the provision of a basic sensory description; and provision of an elaborate/emotional description.

The presentation of more elaborate wine descriptions, which included information regarding winery history and positive wine quality statements, significantly increased the preference rating the consumers allocated to the wines.

Further to this, the results showed that if the expectations elicited by the wine description closely matched the actual liking from tasting, consumers felt far more positive emotions than if it didn’t meet expectations.

“These findings have important implications for wine producers and the hospitality industry in that descriptions require more than just wine tasting notes,” says Dr Lukas Danner, post-doctoral research fellow and first author on the study. “Companies could even consider involving consumers in label description optimisation.”

This research was funded by Australian grapegrowers and winemakers through Wine Australia with matching funds from the Australian Government.

Wine Communicator Awards open for entries

Entries are now open for WCA’s prestigious annual Wine Communicator of the Year Awards, which this year will be offered in 10 categories.

Following judges feedback in 2016, both the ‘Best Wine Book’ and ‘Best Wine Publication’ will this year be split in to two distinct categories, technical and trade, and consumer. A new category has also been developed for Best Wine Public Relations Campaign.

“We felt it necessary to split the two awards into different categories, to better reflect the technical and trade and consumer media industries,” said WCA National Chair Angus Barnes.

“The introduction of the Best Wine Public Relations Campaign Award also highlights the great work being produced for wine brands across the nation.

“We look forward to reviewing this year’s entries and the quality standard of work consistently being produced in the wine media industry.”

Entries are sought in the following categories, with the overall Wine Communicator of the Year selected from category winners.

  • Best Wine Book Award (Trade, Technical)
  • Best Wine Book Award (Consumer)
  • Best Wine Publication Award (Trade, Technical)
  • Best Wine Publication Award (Consumer)
  • Digital Wine Communicator of the Year Award
  • Best Wine Website or Wine App Award
  • Best Published Feature Articles or Column Award
  • Best Wine Educator Award
  • Best Public Relations Campaign
  • New Wine Writer of the Year

Entries close on Thursday 31 August 2017, with winners to be announced at a special presentation night in Sydney on Wednesday 1 November 2017, which will be sponsored by Riedel Australia.

The annual WCA Wine Communicator Awards recognise outstanding contribution to, and excellence in, wine communication in all its forms. In each category, a short list of finalists is reviewed and selected by the panel of expert judges. A winner is then chosen in consultation with WCA Board. The overall Wine Communicator of the Year is then chosen from the category winners.

 

Australasia Scotch Whisky market set to decline, Asia to grow

Australian craft scotch whisky makers would be wise to eye the Asian export market, as the latest Vinexpo report by the International Wine and Spirits Research (IWSR) predicts it will enter new growth after three difficult years.

Malt Scotch, benefiting from its craft and provenance credentials, will continue to erode share of premium blended Scotch, according to the IWSR, a London-based industry research group.

The report noted that a slowdown in North America, Russia and Australasia will drag down category performance, but strong growth in Asia and Latin America will bring overall year-on-year growth.

From their smaller base, malts are forecast to grow faster than blends.

The report noted that the higher price segments continue to gain market share. North America and Asia will see the fastest development of malt Scotch over the forecast period.

 

 

‘Ethical and sustainable’ Fair Açaí Liqueur

Fair, a sprits brand which markets itself as ‘socially responsible’, has unveiled a new liqueur made using açaí – a ‘superfood’ berry from the Amazon rainforest.

Fair Açaí Liqueur is made using açaí berries from the Amazon rainforest. This berry contains antioxidants, fibre and heart-healthy fats that are claimed to be good for the skin, hair and metabolism.

The sugar used in the liqueur is organically grown and sourced from a Fairtrade co-op in Malawi.

Essence of the berries is extracted through a maceration process. Then follows a slow and progressive reduction by adding the raw sugar juice and a Fairtrade neutral spirit. The water used is sourced from the Cognac region of France, where the liqueur is also bottled.

Açaí Liqueur will be launching at the upcoming Good Food & Wine Show in Melbourne on 2 June and distribution across NSW and VIC is underway.