Foster’s appoints new chief marketing officer

Posted by Rita Mu

Beer giant, Foster’s, has appointed Andy Gibson to the role of chief marketing officer.

Gibson joins Foster’s after 12 years with UK-based alcoholic beverage company, Diageo, where he held various senior management and marketing roles in Europe, North and Latin America, Asia Pacific and Australia. Most recently, he was general manager of Diageo’s Germany, Austria and Switzerland operations.

 “Andy’s appointment adds to the depth and experience of our senior management team and reaffirms our commitment to investing in the iconic brands that will drive the growth of the business”, Foster’s Chief Executive Officer John Pollaers said.

The role of chief marketing officer at Foster’s has been vacant for almost a year, according to AdNews.

Gibson replaces Peter Sinclair who was promoted within the company last August to head up marketing and commercial development for the African and Eastern business, relocating to Dubai.

Gibson will begin his new role in November 2011.

Image: viad.tv

DrinkWise introduces new alcohol warning labels

Posted by Rita Mu

Alcohol industry-funded group, DrinkWise Australia, has launched four new labels to be displayed on alcohol sold in Australia. 

The labels, to be introduced gradually as part of a voluntary scheme, were developed in collaboration with DrinkWise members who represent 80 per cent of alcohol sold in Australia.

The messages on the labels include:
• ‘Get the Facts’ about drinking alcohol from the DrinkWise website
• Kids and alcohol don’t mix
• Is your drinking harming yourself or others?
• It is safest not to drink while pregnant

The label messages will be supported by a retail point-of-sale campaign, with educational materials provided to consumers in outlets where alcohol is purchased.

Chair of the DrinkWise Australia Board, Trish Worth, said that research undertaken by DrinkWise through Quantum Market Research in 2010 found high levels of support in the community for consumer information messages on alcohol products.

“Two thirds of consumers surveyed said they would support the idea of information messages on alcohol labels and one third said they would be likely to seek more information about responsible drinking as a result of seeing a label message,” Worth said.

“Providing messages that prompt consumers to think about their drinking, and supporting those messages with ongoing education activities and campaigns, will help support the community in making informed decisions about their approach to drinking alcohol.”

Worth said the label messages were part of a broader community awareness and education campaign that DrinkWise was rolling out.

“It is widely recognised that labels alone will not change consumer behaviour and that they must be part of broader education initiatives to make an impact – which is why we have coupled the messages with a pointer to our website, and why we will continue to support them through our ongoing educational efforts,” she said.

“This initiative expands our campaigns from television, online and print directly to the consumer. Delivering consumer information messages via product labels and at retail point of sale will help us engage directly with Australia’s current drinkers.”

Executive Director, Professor Ian Hickie, at the Brain and Mind Research Institute at the University of Sydney, welcomed the new messages.

“The new and ongoing research leaves no doubt that delaying a teen’s initiation to alcohol is the right approach.” Prof Hickie said.

“From a brain science point of view, you would not mix alcohol and a teenage brain at any period. The idea that you would expose a teenage brain  early to alcohol, to socialise it, is dangerous. It is an important message to get out to the community.”

Australian Medical Association President Dr Steve Hambleton said the warnings needed to be clearer and tougher.

"The labels introduced voluntarily by the industry do not go far enough," Dr Hambleton told the Australian Associated Press.

"The alcohol industry must make a full and genuine commitment to reducing alcohol-related harms to teenagers and young people by ceasing the targeted marketing of alcohol to teenagers and sponsorship of sporting and youth cultural events."

 Image: ipopculture.net

 

Beer sales slump

Posted by Rita Mu

Beverage sales have slumped in the last five years, with the decrease in packaged beer driving the decline, according to a new report by Nielsen.

The 2011 Wider Beverage Report shows that for the first time since 2006, total beverage retail sales values fell last year. Total alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverage volumes also fell over the past year, the report shows.

Traditional beers such as VB and Tooheys have suffered a fall in sales volumes over the past few years, while premium beers like Coopers, Peroni and Blue Tongue have bucked the trend with strong growth.

According to the report, Australians are spending 60 per cent of their beverage dollars on alcoholic drinks – an amount which is five times greater than the next largest category, carbonated drinks.

“Packaged beer has been a key component in the recent beverage decline,” Director for Nielsen’s Liquor Services Group, Liz Watkinson, said. “It represents the largest beverage segment, and accounts for nearly one dollar in every four spent in the beverage category. This is the first time we’ve seen the segment decline in over four years, as the traditional low carb and premium beer growth engines no longer appear to be fuelling the category.”

Functional waters, energy drinks, tea drinks and cider experienced the highest growth rates all of the beverage segments in recent years, according to the report.

Image: 4bars.com.au

SABMiller could save AUS$11.8m per year from lighter bottle top

SABMiller, the firm looking to takeover the Foster’s Group, claim they could make an annual saving of US$12.6m (AUS$11.8m) by converting to a new lighter bottle top.

The cap was developed by Backus, a Peruvian subsidiary of SABMiller, and Packaging Product Peru.

SABMiller have said that it is a low-gauge bottle top, which uses less steel in production, slashing both raw material cost as well as CO2 emissions.

Taking into account both their bottled larger and carbonated soft drinks, SABMiller annually produce something in the region of 42 billion bottle tops, totalling a weight of about 100,000 tonnes.

Should the new bottle top be round out around globally, the firm expects an overall decrease in steel use of 10 percent. 

The company has designed the cap using 0.17mm steel rather than the standard 0.22mm thickness and finished with an embossed ring around the bottle lip, which prevents leakage from “spring back”. 

SABMiller say the standard cap weights about 2.38 grams, while the new cap is 2.14 grams. This means that each pallet of bottles using the low-gauge cap will be 360 grams less, than standard capped bottles. 

SABMiller is expecting to roll out the new bottle top across Peru and Ecuador during the second half of next year. 

 

Image courtesy of https://brewgadgets.com

Asahi moves to expand its presence in Australian and NZ

The Japanese beverage company, Asahi, is pushing through negotiations with an Australian as well as a New Zealand soft drinks deals.

Asahi were initial blocked in a bid for the whole of P&N Beverages, Australia’s third largest soft drinks firm, but have since revised the offer to include only the water and juice business.

At the same time that the P&N Beverages deal is being finalised, Asahi has also revealed plans to buy New Zealand’s juice maker, Charlie’s Group.

Asahi believes the deals will boost the company’s overseas market share by 20-30 percent, with an increase in sales of JPY 2-2.5 trillion (approx AUS$23 billion).

In 2009 Asahi bought Australia’s second larges beverage maker, Schweppes (along with the rights to Pepsi and 7UP). The water and Juice brands of P&N Beverages will be merged with Schweppes, strengthening the latter’s product portfolio.

“Asahi aims to enhance its position within the Australian beverage market by enabling Schweppes to strengthen its product portfolio and gain efficiencies in supply chain management," said the firm.

BeverageDaily.com reported that the Sydney-based analyst John Band suggest Coco-Cola should be concerned that Asahi will become a more “formidable competitor” as a result of the deal.

Although Mr. Band did add that neither deal will have a significant global impact, because Asahi does not own any international brands.

“Its volumes outside Japan come largely from Pepsi and Schweppes brands that it can’t sell outside Australasia. Neither of these deals do much to change that.”

“Asahi’s just ensuring that its Australian business has the same strength that any [second position] drinks player in any market should have, by picking up some local brands in appropriate categories.”

 

Image courtesy of https://online.wsj.com

Chemicals in food packaging may harm unborn babies: Study

Fears surrounding the use of Bisphenol A (BPA) have been reignited following the publication of a new US study that has identified risks to unborn babies.

BPA has attracted much attention over the last few years, amid fear that it might be harmful to the health of babies when the chemical is present in baby bottles.

The new study, however, has suggested that unborn babies might be at greater risk via the mother’s diet.

Conducted at the University of Missouri in the US, the author of the study, Associate Professor Cheryl Rosenfeld, has found that the testosterone production of unborn babies may be affected by exposure to BPA.

The researchers conducting the experiment fed pregnant mice small amounts of BPA and tested the navigational abilities of male offspring when they became sexually mature.

"The males that were exposed to BPA performed at a worse rate than those that were not exposed to BPA” Prof. Rosenfeld said.

The use of BPA in baby bottles has already been banned in some countries and some companies begun to remove BPA from their products.

In light of the new research, Prof. Rosenfeld has urged more research to be done into the effect of BPA before birth rather than just after birth.

She says there needs to be regulation to make it mandatory for companies to display whether or not their products contain BPA.

Scientific research has been published supporting both sides of the argument, rending the issue quite inconclusive and leading national health policies to vacillate with each new set of findings. 
 

 

Image: aboutlawsuits.com

 

Green bottle gets a boost from new plant-based PET

The search for a fully renewable PET drinks bottle has moved a step closer with the development of a PET feedstock from plant sugars.

By using its own catalytic process, the US-based company Virent has created paraxylene (PX), a new feedstock created entirely from plant-based sugars.

According to the manufacturers, the PX molecules exactly match those of petroleum and therefore share the same properties.

With the trademark BioFormPX, the petroleum-free feedstock has potential applications in bottling, other packaging and various fibres and materials.

“Our plant-based PX paves the way for 100 per cent sustainable, recyclable products and packaging with complete freedom from crude oil,” said Virent CEO, Lee Edwards.

The process used to create PX can incorporate different raw materials and can be adapted to specific customer requirements, according to Mr Edwards.

“Our PX can be blended at any ratio the customer desires, and made from a wide variety of feedstocks, including sugar cane, corn, and woody biomass. Our catalytic process is tunable to customer specs, and situated to meet the entire spectrum of fossil fuel replacement.”
 

 

Image courtesy of www.youwb.com

SABMiller’s $9.5b offer too low for Foster’s

Foster’s Group has rejected a takeover bid from the global brewing giant SABMiller, saying that the $9.5 billion offer significantly undervalues the company.

In a statement issued by Foster’s it said that SABMiller had offered $4.90 per share, which represented a premium of around 8.2 percent on the closing price yesterday.

"The board of Foster’s believes that the proposal significantly undervalues the company in the context of a change of control and, as such, it does not intend to take any further action in relation to it," the company said in a statement.

 

Image courtesy of www.theaustralian.com.au

Food Challenge Awards Finalists: Beverages

The Food Challenge Award 2011 Beverages category is sponsored by O-I.

Di Bella Coffee Company
 
TORQ Natural Instant Coffee

TORQ is a natural coffee concentrate that can be used to make a fresh full-bodied cup of hot coffee or a thirst quenching iced coffee. It uses a cold brew process in conjunction with a patented micro-filtration, which creates a contaminant-free product, with12 month shelf stability at room temperature. It has no additives or preservatives. The coffee is full-bodied, sensationally smooth, and never bitter.

JMB Beverages
 
Hopman Alcohol Removed Premium Pale

Hopman Premium Pale is an alcohol removed beer launched in the domestic market in November 2010. Careful selection and rigorous assessment of ingredients (especially hops), has enabled the company to produce a premium "beer-like" beverage that is both non-intoxicating and almost identical in flavor to an alcoholic beer.

Nova Springwater Pty Ltd
 
Nova Springwater

The springwater goes to 4 stages of sub micron filtration starting with 0.2 micron Quartz Filter, 0.1 micron Precision Filter, UV disinfection and Finally 0.01 micron Hollow Fibre Filter, these standards are much more rigid compared to the current industry standards of 10, 5 and 1 micron filtration.

The 12L bottle type is an Australian first to offer a BPA free bottle for water coolers, using 60% less plastics per litre when compared to a 600ml disposable bottle types.

Oomph! Coffee
 
Oomph! Tasmanian Gourmet Coffee

Oomph! Coffee is sourced from farmers from all over the world under a ‘Global Care’ agreement, which ensures that farmers are paid fair wages for their harvest. The beans used to make the coffee are hand selected and blended to complement their individual characteristics.

Pacific Beverages
 
Bruers Bright

Bruers Bright Beer is an unpasteurised, natural draught beer filled straight into kegs using a unique flavour seal process that locks in the brewery fresh taste. It is a highly drinkable Australian style draught lager with a clean fresh aroma, a fruity individualistic palate and a soft bitter aftertaste, delivering the ultimate fresh beer experience.

Preshafood
 
Preshafruit

Preshafruit is the world’s first high pressure processed fruit juice, which is made from quality 100% Australian fruit and has a shelf-life of 210 days without any preservatives. Preshafruit is made from a unique cold pressure technology, which uses less energy, delivers twice the natural vitamin C, antioxidants and digestive enzymes of any traditional heat pasteurised juice.

Rebello Wines
 
Cheeky Rascal Cider

Cheeky Rascal ciders are genuine fruit ciders containing 100 per cent apple, strawberry, raspberry and pear juice, with a variety of apples used. No flavouring or concentrates are used. Depending on the season, a combination of Granny Smith, Pink Lady or Royal Gala apples are selected to make the cider, giving the best flavour profile and sugar/acid balance. Raspberry and strawberry varieties are also selected according to seasonal availability and the flavour, sugar acid requirements needed to balance with the apple.

Beam Global Australia
 
Russian Standard Vodka Citrus RTD

Russian Standard Vodka Citrus RTD (Ready-To-Drink) is a refreshing beverage created exclusively for the Australian market. The brand’s soft, pure qualities result from state-of-the-art filtration and distillation techniques at a sophisticated vodka production centre in St Petersburg, Russia.

Somage Fine Foods
 
Chamellia Iced Tea

Chamellia Organic Iced Teas are the first high pressure pasteurised, cold infused and ready-to-drink iced teas. The teas are made from fruit, whole leaf tea or herbs and contain no artificial colours, flavours, sugars, or concentrates. High pressure pasteurisation is then used during bottling to ensure that the nutritional value of the ingredients is preserved in the end product.

Glass Is Life, a global campaign

The glass container manufacturer, Owen-Illinois (O-I), has launched a new global marketing campaign called Glass Is Life.

The glassmaking giant has developed the campaign on the understanding that the natural properties of the material – transparency, hygiene, recyclable – means glass packaging helps build successful food and beverage brands.

Through collaboration with top chiefs, environmentalists and CEOs, O-I draws attention to the widespread appeal of glass as a packaging material. 

“O-I’s extensive research shows a strong demand for glass among consumers, but the marketplace does not adequately reflect this interest. We aim to influence the food and beverage industry’s packaging decisions by showing the power of glass,” said Al Stroucken, Chairman and CEO of O-I. “As the leading maker of the purest and most sustainable packaging, O-I is excited to spearhead a movement that demonstrates the unique attributes of glass packaging and brings brands back into glass.”

The campaign includes six speakers from different walks of life, who discuss their thoughts about using glass:

  • Sanpellegrino S.p.A. Chairman and CEO Stefano Agostini, who says glass  showcases the quality of the S. Pellegrino brand.
  • Monini Olive Oil CEO Zefferino Monini, who chooses glass because it best preserves the flavor of the product.
  • Environmentalist Celine Cousteau, granddaughter of Jacques Cousteau, who prefers glass because it is natural, healthy and sustainable.
  • true fruits Co-Founder Nic Lecloux, who says glass demonstrates the quality and sophistication of his premium product.
  • Bundaberg Brewed Drinks CEO John McLean, who bottles his drinks in glass so it stands out on the shelf. 
  • Agua del Nacimiento CEO Juan Gabriel Gonzalez, who says glass is the only packaging that shows the clarity and purity of Colombia’s best water.

Perfume inspired wine packaging

The market analyst Datamonitor has named Mazzetti d’Altavilla Essentia Vitae, with it’s perfume bottle inspired wine packaging, as its Innovation of the Week.

Recently launched in Germany and Italy, the design was said to “appeal to female consumers, with packaging and formation intended to evoke fine fragrances”.

The names of the different varieties are also more commonly found on the front of a perfume bottle: No. 4 Ruche – jasmine scent, No. 6 Malvasia – rose scent, and No. 8 Moscato – violet scent.

Tom Vierhile, Director of Datamonitor’s Product Launch Analytics team, said: "While perfume-inspired wine may be an acquired taste, Essentia Vitae goes further than most to connect to female consumers. Its perfume-like packaging should break through the crowded product assortments that can often confound shoppers."

 

Image courtesy of www.packagingnews.co.uk 

Tasmania makes roads from recycled glass

Posted by Rita Mu

Recycled glass containers are being used to build Tasmanian roads.

The new recycling program, which has already been implemented in Western Australia, involves the use of broken glass from households, which are difficult to recycle using conventional methods. The broken glass is crushed into sand-sized fragments and mixed with asphalt, which is then used to reseal, repair or build roads.

The program is part of a partnership between the Australian Food and Grocery Council’s Packaging Stewardship Forum, the Tasmanian Government, Roadways and the Hazell Bros Group.

The Tasmanian Government is currently using recycled crushed glass as a substitute for sand in an $800,000 repair and resealing road project on the East Derwent Highway.

The state’s Minister for Infrastructure, David O’Byrne, said the program was great example of innovative thinking.

“Sand is becoming more difficult to obtain – especially in Southern Tasmania – and recycled crushed glass is seen as an eco-friendly alternative,” O’Byrne said.

“It’s especially fitting to promote this initiative on the eve of World Environment Day, which is celebrated each year on June 5th.”

According to the General Manager of the Packaging Stewardship Forum, Jenny Pickles, more than 13,000 tonnes of glass is recycled in Tasmania annually.

“It’s a win for everyone – less waste to landfill, less extraction of virgin materials, and glass is no longer shipped at high cost to Melbourne for recycling,” she said.

Image: Clarence Council’s Mayor, Jock Campbell, in Hobart with a sample of the recycled glass. Source: themercury.com.au

Rumours circulate about a possible international Foster’s takeover

Foster’s have been playing down speculation over a potential joint international takeover, after rumours began to circulate last week.

The comments from the Australian company came after a sharp rise in share prices prompted ASX to speculate as to the group’s future.

Company Secretary Dan Last said that Fosters was “not aware of any unannounced information”, however, analysts have suggested that Molson Coors Brewing from the US and Grupo Modelo SAB from Mexico have been holding talks with global investment banks Deutsche Bank and Bank of America about financing a Foster’s takeover bid.

Neither company made comments concerning the issue last week, but the speculation resulted in a 7 percent surge in Foster’s share prices.

With a market capitalisation of $8.3 billion, Foster’s is one of a very small number of independent brewers that have so far survived consolidation. But since the announcement earlier this year that Foster’s was planning to spin out the Treasury wine division, there has been rumours of an international takeover.

Despite the strong Australian dollar dampening the current appeal of Fosters, several companies have been tipped as potential bidders, including: Japan’s Asahi, Coca-Cola Amatil and SABMiller.

The Herald Sun reported that Bloomberg announced five sources had verified that Molson Coors and Grupo Modelo were in the running for a takeover tilt.

 

Image courtesy of www.smh.com.au/

Factory in China suspected of using plasticiser in food additives

Posted by Rita Mu

A preserved fruits manufacturer in China has been detained by police after the company was suspected of using an industrial chemical in its food additives.

According to Ninemsn, local officers seized six tonnes of food additives, suspected to contain the plastic softener DEHP, from the Yuyan Food Co factory in Dongguang City, Guangdon province, on Wednesday.

Officials suspect the contamination came from raw materials imported from Taiwan.

According to Xinhua news agency, the State Food and Drug Administration has issued an urgent notice, ordering all restaurants not to purchase or use food and food additives imported from the country.

DEHP, which has been linked to hormonal problems in children, has so far been reported in sports drinks, fruit juice, tea, jam and food additives in China and Taiwan.

According to Xinhua news agency, 496 bottles of Taiwanese beverages suspected of containing DEHP in the Guangdong Province and 1,500 bottles of Taiwan beverages that were not quarantined after arriving in the province, have been recalled.
 

Image: wantchinatimes.com

Woman crowned winemaker of the year

Posted by Rita Mu

A woman has been named winemaker of the year for the first time at the Hunter Valley Legends and Wine Industry Awards.

Liz Jackson, who was appointed Chief Winemaker of First Creek Wines in 2008, was awarded the title for her experience, qualifications, winemaking technique and individual style.

"I think Liz is renowned for having a very fine palate so whether she’s male or female she’s a very worthy winner,” Legends Sub Committee member Christina Tulloch told ABC News Online.

Other winners included Jeff Byrne of Audrey Wilkinson Vineyard, who was named ‘Rising Star of the Year,’ and Don McWilliam of McWilliams Wines took home the ‘Living Legend’ award for his long term vision and commitment to the betterment of the Hunter Valley Wine Industry.

A list of all the winners is available HERE.

Tetra Pak launches Tetra Evero Aseptic

Tetra Pak has launched the Tetra Evero Aseptic 1 litre, the first aseptic carton bottle for milk.

“Tetra Evero Aseptic is a new carton shape that delivers ease of use, high impact branding and cost effectiveness,” said Charles Brand, Tetra Pak Vice President of Marketing and Product Management. “This is a unique packaging concept that brings benefits to producers, retailers and consumers.”

Tetra Evero Aseptic is initially aimed at the ambient white milk market, including non-oxygen sensitive milk enriched with calcium, proteins, fibres (inulin), vitamins A and D and some minerals. This will soon expand to cover a wide range of beverages, including flavoured milk, cream and oxygen sensitive milk, such as Omega 3, Iron, Zinc, and Vitamin C.

“For our most strategic project, we knew we had to have Tetra Evero Aseptic,” said Pedro Astals, President and CEO of Corporación Alimentaria Peñasanta (CAPSA), Spain’s largest dairy. He explained that CAPSA chose the Tetra Evero Aseptic for its move into the value- added ambient dairy segment.

“This package expresses evolution, a very advanced step in comparison with today’s packages. Tetra Evero Aseptic is the perfect match of a high value-added product with a highly developed package. To me this is doubtlessly a winner,” said Astals.

Another European dairy, Weihenstephan, one of Germany’s largest traditional dairies, plans to introduce the Tetra Evero Aseptic from the end of May 2011 to a select number of retail outlets in its first market test of the package. 

Among the new packaging solution’s key attributes are:
Functionality: An ergonomic cylindrical shape with flat side panels means it’s easier for big and small hands to hold. The shape also provides the ideal angle for better pouring than other bottles, according to independent consumer research conducted in several European markets.

The new carton providing maximum branding impact, with printing possible across the whole surface of the package. There are two distribution solutions for Tetra Evero Aseptic — an open cardboard tray and film-shrink with a handle.

Customer system cost: The Tetra Pak® A6 iLine™ for Tetra Evero Aseptic brings dairy producers a cost effective and efficient packaging solution for ambient white milk in a bottle. In fact, Tetra Pak A6 iLine, with a capacity of 10,000 packs/hour, takes up to 50 per cent less space and requires 30 per cent less investment than other aseptic bottling lines. It also offers 25 per cent lower operating costs and requires half the electricity consumption than other aseptic bottling lines.

Environment: The Tetra Evero Aseptic combines the easy handling and pouring of a bottle with the environmental advantages of a carton. It is recyclable andmade from FSC™-certified renewable paperboard.

Innovative technologies: Innovative technologies combined with market insight and processes have driven the creation of this pioneering packaging system. The Tetra Evero Aseptic and the Tetra Pak A6 iLine are covered by 14 design and application patents, with advances that include an industry-first ‘gas phase’ sterilisation technique and advanced injection moulding technologies to fuse the top, carton sleeve and capped neck into a ready-to-fill package.

Michael Grosse, Tetra Pak Executive Vice President, Development and Engineering said: “Tetra Pak has committed its industry leading engineering resources and market insight to develop Tetra Evero Aseptic and the Tetra Pak A6 iLine. It has led to a unique packaging solution that delivers value to our customers and the consumers that buy their products – with functionality, cost and environmental performance never before seen in a bottle form.”

The Tetra Pak A6 iLine will first be available in Europe and South America.
 

Fire fighters reveal dangerous chemicals caused Drayton winery fire incident

NSW fire fighters have revealed critical information about the cause of a fire incident that killed two people in a Hunter Valley winery in 2008.

About 9am on 17 January 2008, Drayton’s winery went up in flames after a tank containing SVR – an ethanol-based product used in fermented wine – exploded. Two people; including contractor Edgar Ongo and winemaker Trevor Drayton, were reported dead at the scene.

The explosion was thought to have occurred after Ongo welded a metal plate to the tank, believing it was empty.

According to The Daily Telegraph, veteran fire fighter Darren Brown, gave evidence this week in East Maitland Coroners Court, saying that a thermal imaging camera recorded temperatures on the ruptured tank of 700C as debris from the roof above, which had been blown off, continued to burn around it.

NSW Fire Brigade Inspector Brett Crotty, told the court that the winery’s management had been unaware that the tanks contained ethanol or other flammable chemicals because the only plan or manifest was in locked in an office cut off by flames.

The inquest before Deputy State Coroner Hugh Dillon continues.
 

Image: abc.net.au

NZ winemakers focusing more on label designs

Posted by Rita Mu

New Zealand wineries are demanding more from the designers and printers of their bottle labels as a means of influencing consumer purchasing decisions at the point-of-sale.

Inhouse Design’s Arch MacDonnell said it was critical for winemakers to invest in their labels to remain competitive in the market.

“In what is becoming a saturated field, it is imperative that wine labels stand out from the crowd,” he said. “I think they have a huge influence on point of sale. I think that increasingly people are influenced by the label when buying wine.”

MacDonnell said that while wine label design in New Zealand had been traditionally “relatively conservative”, designers and printers were now increasingly testing new boundaries.

“I think in recent years, we’ve seen some really innovative work coming out of New Zealand, so I think designers and printers are doing a great job,” he said.

Entries to this year’s Pride In Print Awards have shown that designers are pursuing intricate detail and embellishments such as foil, embossing and die-cuts, according to judge Mark Sullivan.

“In fact, it is world class, and something everyone involved in this sector of the industry should be very proud of,” Sullivan said.

“This year’s entries were very diverse, simple spot colour through to complex multi-colour with embellishments, printed with the whole range of processes, flexo, offset, letterpress etcetera.

“It was a pleasure to see and work with such high-quality entries, although it made the judges’ job extremely challenging. The smallest of faults dictated the end results.”

Awards manager Sue Archibald said that wine label entries had grown significantly since they were given their own section.

“We gave them special recognition a few years ago by making them a separate category and the response has been wonderful,” Archibald said.

“The strong design feel has made this a very innovative and colourful area for the judges to adjudicate, and the competition is now the strongest ever.”

This year’s Pride In Print Awards Evening will be held tomorrow, 20 May, at TSB Bank Arena in Wellington, New Zealand.
 

NZ winemakers focusing more on label designs

Posted by Rita Mu

New Zealand wineries are demanding more from the designers and printers of their bottle labels as a means of influencing consumer purchasing decisions at the point-of-sale.

Inhouse Design’s Arch MacDonnell said it was critical for winemakers to invest in their labels to remain competitive in the market.

“In what is becoming a saturated field, it is imperative that wine labels stand out from the crowd,” he said. “I think they have a huge influence on point of sale. I think that increasingly people are influenced by the label when buying wine.”

MacDonnell said that while wine label design in New Zealand had been traditionally “relatively conservative”, designers and printers were now increasingly testing new boundaries.

“I think in recent years, we’ve seen some really innovative work coming out of New Zealand, so I think designers and printers are doing a great job,” he said.

Entries to this year’s Pride In Print Awards have shown that designers are pursuing intricate detail and embellishments such as foil, embossing and die-cuts, according to judge Mark Sullivan.

“In fact, it is world class, and something everyone involved in this sector of the industry should be very proud of,” Sullivan said.

“This year’s entries were very diverse, simple spot colour through to complex multi-colour with embellishments, printed with the whole range of processes, flexo, offset, letterpress etcetera.

“It was a pleasure to see and work with such high-quality entries, although it made the judges’ job extremely challenging. The smallest of faults dictated the end results.”

Awards manager Sue Archibald said that wine label entries had grown significantly since they were given their own section.

“We gave them special recognition a few years ago by making them a separate category and the response has been wonderful,” Archibald said.

“The strong design feel has made this a very innovative and colourful area for the judges to adjudicate, and the competition is now the strongest ever.”

This year’s Pride In Print Awards Evening will be held tomorrow, 20 May, at TSB Bank Arena in Wellington, New Zealand.
 

Beer PET bottles to reach 7.7 billion by 2015: Study

Posted by Rita Mu

Global PET beer bottle consumption is forecast to grow at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 5.3 per cent to reach 7.7 billion bottles by 2015, according to a new study by market research group Pira International.

The Future of Beer in PET Packaging study, conducted for beer brewers, packaging manufactures and suppliers, provides quantitative market sizes segmented by barrier technology, bottle size, region and country. The study also provides technology and market forecasts to 2015.

One of the main drivers for the increased use of PET bottles for packaging beer will be market penetration into areas not suitable for glass, according to the study.

While Central and Eastern Europe are currently the dominant markets for PET beer bottles, the study also shows good growth for beer in PET bottles going forward, but at rates lower than the 2003-08 pre-recession era. This is a result of higher taxes on beer in Russia and Ukraine, according to the study.

PET beer bottle consumption in Western Europe, North America and South and Central America, is forecast to grow as well in the next five years until 201, but at a relatively low rate.

In Asia-Pacific, China will lead demand for beer in PET bottles.

"PET is showing increased demand from a number of different categories including juices and nectars, ready-to-drink (RTD) teas, functional drinks, flavoured waters and beer. PET bottles are convenient, practical, lightweight and unbreakable," Head of Editorial at Pira, Adam Page, said.

"However many brand owners remain reticent when it comes to using PET packaging for beer. Despite not taking off on a large scale in many traditional beer-drinking countries, there is still a huge amount of interest in the potential for beer in PET due to the perceived advantages. New technologies are helping challenge some negative perceptions and create opportunities for brewers, brand owners, packaging converters and suppliers."

Image: drinkingandyou.com