snacks

Food safe bearings save local snacks

From meat pies, to lamingtons, to fairy bread – it’s no secret that Australians love their snacks. Australia is home to a few iconic homegrown snack brands with the industry peaking in demand last year at an annual revenue of more than 4.2 million AUD, according to Statista. Read more

food

CRC gives the green light for food grade plastics

With ever-tightening health and safety regulations being implemented across the food and beverage industry, production sites require close monitoring and consistently reliable products without fuss. Companies must ensure they are in compliance with HACCP, ISO and NSF H1 standards at all times, keeping up to date documentation of chemical use in a holistic, cost-effective way. Read more

macadamia

Harvesting the macadamia boom in Bundaberg

The macadamia is finally getting its moment in the sun. Australian macadamia growers have been experiencing bumper crops in recent years, with annual production quantities reaching more than 50,000 tonnes in 2021, according to the Australian Macadamia Society.1  Read more

Safe passage from keg or cask to glass

The food and beverage industry in Australia is subject to regulations that align with ANSI requirements and promote acceptance by USDA and FDA regulatory authorities. “Beverage producers such as wineries and breweries must ensure that the pump and valve equipment on site are in accordance with hygienic standards and guidelines and do not compromise the quality of their product,” says Michael Rowe. Read more

Premium hydraulic oils age like fine wine

In the last two years, the Australian harvest has seen the end of a long drought season, bouncing back with buoyancy, with incentives from the government boosting sales of agricultural equipment to accommodate the demands of high yields.

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brewery

Supplying food-safe solutions to a Melbourne Brewery

Founded in 2012, the Deeds Brewing facility in Glen Iris is a relatively fresh addition to the Melbourne craft beer scene. From humble beginnings brewing from home, the decision to open a brewing facility was born of a very simple ethos the team at Deeds adhere to: they brew beer that they would want to drink.  Read more

compressors

A tale of two compressors

Finding the right compressor for the job is easier said than done. That is why Motion Industrial Centre Technical Experts like Jamie Robertson are there — to relieve that pressure.  Read more

How to save time on belt repairs: A grain handling case study

When you work in the grain handling business, ensuring your conveyor equipment is in tip top condition for harvest season is essential. Which is why Kerry Hickmott leans on BSC in Toowoomba for the support and supply of LOCTITE®product for preventative maintenance and belt repair. 

“I run a workshop that primarily builds and repairs grain handling equipment for a major grain producer,” explains Kerry. “In Queensland we have two harvest seasons for grain – these fall over spring and summer. For this reason, we carry out maintenance and repair work from April through to September to make sure the equipment is in good condition for harvest.”

Grain belts are, of course, critical to these operations. Business Development Executive for BSC in Toowoomba, Mark Brocherie, explains why.

“When it comes to handling the grain, conveyor belts are commonly used. This rubber belting can tear from time to time,” he says. “If you do have a tear in the belt, it can lead to premature failure and consequently cause a lot of damage, including a potential breakdown.”

According to Kerry, breakdowns have to be avoided at all costs. 

“Downtime is not an option for us – if it does occur, it has serious implications for our business, not just in terms of immediate costs but in how those subsequent delays will affect our customers,” expounds Kerry. “It’s a competitive business. If people are waiting too long to drop their grain off, they will call another grain depot to make alternative arrangements.”

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Rexnord

Rexnord flattop chains: Chugging along since the 1930s

If you had milk with your cereal this morning or a soft drink with your lunch, there’s a high chance the product you held in your hands travelled on a Rexnord conveyor chain at some point in its production or handling process to reach you. As a world leading manufacturer of conveying solutions, Rexnord’s conveying chains are adopted by many original equipment manufacturers in the food and beverage sector.

Rexnord introduced its ground-breaking FlatTop conveyor chains in 1938, starting with the straight-running 815 TableTop® stainless steel chain. These were the world’s first metal chains that integrated a top plate with hinge eyes, giving them the versatility to convey anything from individual units to packaged and cased goods.

The Rexnord FlatTop conveying chains, including the TableTop and MatTop® series, have since been expanded to offer many materials, types and grades, enabling the solutions to be used across a wide range of applications, from beverage filling to case handling, container making, food conveying and even automotive.

Rexnord’s conveying chains are supplied and supported in Australia through Industrial Solutions Australia businesses – namely CBC, BSC and Webster BSC.

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A well baked solution for Suprima

The CRC Greenlight program sounded like the perfect package to Steve Carr, Engineering Manager for Suprima Bakeries, when he first learned about the program through John Perri, Key Account Executive at BSC. Read more

A single brand offering for rotating needs in the food and beverage industry

Food and beverage processing plants in Australia will soon have access to a complete range of corrosion-resistant ball bearings and ball bearing housed units from Timken® to meet their rotating equipment needs. Industrial Solutions Australia will have the new Timken products available across its business network of CBC, BSC and Webster BSC branches as early as May.

Tony Tormey, Industrial Solutions Australia Product Manager for Industrial Bearings, says the new Timken products have already generated a lot of interest among the industry players.

“The food market generally lacks a single brand solution when it comes to bearing requirements. Food and beverage plants that deal with harsh chemicals and aggressive washdowns can benefit from maximising their hygiene levels with Timken’s new corrosion-resistant range,” says Tony.

The Timken Company have now, launched a new corrosion-resistant ball bearing product range for applications that require ball bearings to withstand chemical washdowns and wet environments.

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The making of Robmac nut harvesters

“We want to build the best machines that we can. Something that will last in the field for many years. To do that, we have to start off with the best components,” says David Eggins of Roberts Machinery, a family-owned company in Alstonville, New South Wales, best known as the manufacturer behind the Robmac macadamia nut harvester machines.

David’s father, Robert Eggins, built his first peanut harvester and bagging machine back in 1959 when he was just 19 years old. In 1962, he started the business of Roberts Machinery, which has been designing, building and repairing farm machinery for over 59 years. 

With the growth of the macadamia industry in Alstonville, Roberts Machinery became heavily involved in the macadamia industry and 23 years ago, introduced the Robmac harvester, a lightweight stand-alone harvester with the ability to operate efficiently in wet and dry conditions with very low soil compaction. 

Today, there are over 240 Robmac harvesters in the field, and service and support of these units has become an important part of the business for Roberts Machinery. The team also runs a production pipeline with three or six harvester units under production at any given time, building an average of 12 to 15 Robmac units each year. Read more

Keeping the Tim Tams coming

For a lot of Australians, Arnott’s biscuits are associated with sweet memories. From growing up with a vintage Arnott’s biscuit tin, to introducing the delights of a ‘Tim Tam Slam’, Arnott’s products have lodged themselves in the hearts and homes of Australians throughout the iconic brand’s 155-year history. In fact, an estimated 95% of Australian households stock Arnott’s biscuits.

Making tasty treats for the nation comes with responsibilities. The maintenance teams at Arnott’s factories work hard to ensure the plants run as efficiently as possible to keep up with the large orders Arnott’s receives.

For Paul Nitschke, who works as Maintenance Services Team Leader at Arnott’s Marleston plant in Adelaide, working with the iconic biscuit manufacturer is a source of pride. Read more

Supporting Bundaberg’s booming macadamia industry

The macadamia industry in Bundaberg has been growing rapidly. After starting as a small industry in the early 2000s, Bundaberg overtook the Northern Rivers in 2016 to become the largest producing macadamia region in Australia.

Ben Steinhardt’s business, B Fabricated, has been heavily involved in Bundaberg’s macadamia industry since 2009 when he built the first macadamia harvester for his family’s farm. His harvesting machines soon gained popularity and orders flew in from the neighbouring macadamia farms.

Today, B Fabricated manufactures not just nut harvesters but all types of agricultural processing equipment, including conveyors, bucket elevators and batch weighing machines and also offers ad-hoc fabrication and repair services to the local farming industry.

To read the rest of the article, click here. 

A lubricant for all seasons

Australian company Candan Industries first introduced its popular Inox MX3 product in 1989 as an anti-corrosion and anti-moisture lubricant.

The product’s popularity has grown over the years as both industrial and domestic consumers keep finding new applications for it in their everyday maintenance tasks.

Inox MX3FG, a low-odour equivalent of the original Inox MX3 was introduced in 2008 to fill a gap for odour-free, food-grade lubricants. Today, the the MX3FG has found widespread popularity in par with the original MX3 product.

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BSC helps food manufacturer out of a ‘sticky’ situation

A major food manufacturer in Melbourne had to frequently replace bearings in their filling machine which injects sticky breakfast product into jars. High exposure to moisture and detergents to clean the machine took its toll on the bearings, which necessitated bearing replacements every few months.

When BSC sales specialist Jamie Stonehouse learned about the problem, he recommended replacing the standard ball bearings with NSK’s Molded-Oil deep groove ball bearings to extend the machine’s service life.

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