Fast cleaning of barrels, drums and food vessels

The TankJet M60 Mobile Tank Cleaner from Spraying Systems removes tough residues quickly and effectively using low flow rates.  The tank cleaner is ideal for cleaning wine, food, beverage and chemical barrels as well as drums and kegs up to 5’ (1.5 m) in diameter. 

Features include narrow angle full cone sprays that rotate in multiple axes for complete and thorough 360° coverage and a non-lubricated air motor which allows for continuous and reliable operation. Cycle times can be achieved in less than 5 minutes with one full cycle completed every 16 revolutions. 

The TankJet M60 Mobile tank cleaner offers effective and efficient cleaning with no damage to the barrel toast. In addition, the tank cleaner is simple to use, easy to rebuild and is compatible with a wide range of pumps including pressure washers. Having a mobile tank cleaner like the TankJet M60 gives users the added benefit of being able to move the tank cleaner from one barrel or drum to the next with ease when required.

The tank cleaner is able to fit in openings as small as 1-3/4” (44.5 mm) and can be easily inserted in standard bunghole openings. The materials, which have direct contact with fluid include 316 stainless steel, carbon graphite PTFE-filled PEEK, EPDM and PTFE. 

Living dangerously: climate change means extra risks for baby fish

www.theleadsouthaustralia.com.au/industries/research-development/living-dangerously-climate-change-means-extra-risks-for-baby-fish/Living dangerously: climate change means extra risks for baby fish

Published today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, new research from the University of Adelaide suggests that climate change will reduce the number of baby fish that make it to adulthood.

The study indicates that increased atmospheric carbon dioxide could have an impact through altering the behaviour of juvenile fish, leading to poorer chances of survival.

“After hatching in the open ocean, baby fish travel to reefs or mangroves as safe places to feed and grow into adults,” explained Tullio Rossi, lead author on the study and PhD candidate at The Environment Institute, University of Adelaide.

“But when ocean acidity increases due to higher dissolved carbon dioxide, a number of factors reduce the chance of fish actually finding those safe havens.”

Tullio’s study focused on barramundi, a tropical fish whose range extends from the eastern Indian Ocean to the western Central Pacific. The species is highly valued across fisheries production, tourism and aquaculture industries.

In Australia, commercial barramundi fisheries produce around 5000 tonnes per annum, with an estimated production value of around AU$45 million.

“Wild barramundi migrate from fresh water to the ocean to spawn, with eggs and freshly hatched fish typically found around river mouths and marine bays,” said Tullio.

“At around two weeks of age, juvenile barramundi settle into mangroves and wetland habitats.”

But how do they know where to go? By listening.

Snapping shrimp and other creatures living in mangroves produce an underwater ruckus the fish are able to hear and follow.

Tullio’s research showed that when barramundi hatch and grow under conditions of elevated carbon dioxide, their response to mangrove sound is changed from attraction to avoidance. The study conditions were designed to reflect carbon dioxide levels expected by the end of this century at the current rate of carbon emissions.

“Our results show that ocean acidification can disrupt the window of opportunity for sound-driven orientation by baby barramundi towards settlement habitats,” said Tullio.

“This could lead to decreased chances of finding suitable adult habitat, leaving fish exposed to predation and starvation for longer periods of time.”

The study also found that even if they do find suitable shelter, baby barramundi exposed to elevated carbon dioxide are then inclined to remain hidden more than normal. From an ecological perspective, this might result in decreased success in finding food.

The scientists believe that increased ocean acidity changes how fish process sensory information via neurotransmitters, creating striking and dangerous alterations in their behaviour.

“If we continue to burn fossil fuels at current levels we could put baby fish in serious trouble, ultimately leaving them lost in an acidified ocean,” says Tullio.

“And this would inevitably lead to fewer adult fish and, potentially, reduced stocks for the fisheries we depend on for food.”

But it’s not too late.

“The good news is that we are still in time to limit our carbon emissions to levels that are not too dangerous for marine animals,” said Tullio.

Signed by 196 nations, The Paris Agreement was reached on December 12 2015, and commits nations to a timetable of emissions reductions aimed at keeping temperatures ‘well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C.’

Tullio Rossi performed this study in collaboration with Professor Sean Connell (University of Adelaide), Dr Stephen Simpson (University of Exeter) and Professor Philip Munday (James Cook University).

Tassal lands Australian Business Award for sustainability

Tasmanian salmon producer Tassal has received an Australian Business Award for Sustainability.

The award, which is benchmarked against international performance standards, recognises organisations demonstrating leadership and commitment to sustainable business practices.

Tassal Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director Mark Ryan said the award was timely.

“The company is delighted to receive this award that recognises its achievements and commitment to responsible and sustainable salmon farming,” he said.

“Underpinning our goal to minimise our impact on the environment is our Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) certification which has now been achieved across all our farms. We are the first salmon company in the world to achieve this.”

Mr. Ryan said Tassal was committed to continuous improvement, ongoing measurement and transparent communications via its annual sustainability report and continuing leadership role in sustainable salmon farming.

Tassal’s Head of Sustainability Linda Sams said while the company had made significant progress in the sustainability space over the past four years, the company was not being complacent about future work.

“Tassal’s partnership with WWF Australia has been pivotal in our work to date,” she said.

“We still aim to continue to lead sustainable aquaculture production in Australia, with all our products meeting best practice environmentally-responsible standards.”

Tassal is a signatory to the WWF Global Seafood Charter which sets out clear principles and objectives to safeguard valuable marine ecosystems, ensuring the long-term viability of seafood supplies.

 

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