Shift in rankings of companies listed in Rabobank Global Dairy Top 20

For the second consecutive year, there are no new entrants to the Rabobank’s Dairy Top 20 list, but there’s been a slight shuffle in rankings.

The world’s largest food and beverage company, Switzerland’s Nestlé, reigns supreme on the list, but the gap between number one and number two has narrowed.

French Lactalis swapped places with Danone, moving into second place.

Danone slipped to the third spot, after divesting Stonyfield following the acquisition of WhiteWave, reducing its stake in Yakult, and selling its holdings in the Al Safi Danone joint venture in Saudi Arabia.

READ: Nestlé pledges to use only certified sustainable palm oil within five years

Dairy price recovery in 2017 has positively affected the combined turnover of the top 20 global dairy companies, which was up 7.2 per cent on the year in USD, RaboResearch has shown.

Dairy senior analyst Peter Paul Coppes said the USD five billion threshold was difficult to achieve due to a scarcity of large acquisitions or mergers.

“However, while the names have remained the same, the order shifted in 2017.”

Merger-and-acquisition (M&A) activity in the dairy sector grew in 2017, fuelled – as in other sectors – by the availability of cheap capital.

Cooperatives are still dominating, but they are also challenged. Deals between Danone and WhiteWave, and Saputo and Murray Goulburn, had limited impact on rankings within the Global Dairy Top 20.

While M&A occurs in the dairy sector, dairy acquisitions tend to be limited in size and financial impact.

There is potential for growth within increased collaborations between Chinese and non-Chinese companies. If this happens, China has the potential to create a pipeline of global management talent.

Chinese companies need to address the integration of non-Chinese management as they consider global growth opportunities.

Rabobank sees an increased amount of disruption-based M&A deals, either defensive or opportunistic.

By nature, these deals are often small and involve start-ups, but they are growing in volume.

Nestlé pledges to use only certified sustainable palm oil within five years

Well known chocolate manufacturer Nestlé is committed to using certified sustainable palm oil in all its products by 2023.

On Monday, the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO ) reinstated Nestlé’s membership following its time-bound action plan to achieve 100 per cent RSPO certified sustainable palm oil.

RSPO and Nestlé’s vision is to transform the palm oil industry for a sustainable future.

In a bid to achieve this they believe the entire industry needs to be more transparent and inclusive.

Achieving this also requires direct supply chain engagement and capacity building throughout the supply chain.

Nestlé’s global head of responsible sourcing Benjamin Ware said transparency in Nestlé’s supply chain had always been a priority.

“Nestlé has always been committed to implementing responsible sourcing and has made significant progress towards our commitment to using fully responsibly sourced palm oil.

“Nestlé supports RSPO’s role in driving industry wide change and appreciates its decision following the submission of our action plan, which focuses on increasing traceability primarily through segregated RSPO palm oil.

“This builds on Nestlé’s ongoing activities to achieve a traceable and responsibly sourced palm oil supply chain.”

Nestlé would play a leading role within RSPO by participating in working groups and sharing its experiences in addressing some of the critical environmental and socio-economic challenges affecting the sector, said Ware.

“In line with the RSPO’s objectives, this work will focus on preventing deforestation, particularly the protection of peatland and high-carbon stock land, as well as respecting human rights across the value chain,” said Ware.

RSPO CEO Darrel Webber said when joining RSPO all members made a commitment to transform the palm oil industry.

“Nestlé has pledged to step up their efforts in working actively on solutions within the RSPO system, via active participation.

“It’s with this in mind that we are welcoming Nestlé back to the Roundtable, confident they will live up to our membership obligations and succeed in delivering on their time-bound plan. We trust that by working collectively we are able to realise a sustainable, respectful and responsible palm oil industry.”

Global Easter egg launches up on last year

When it comes to chocolate eggs, bunnies and other treats, it seems there has never been so much choice for chocolate lovers around the world.

According to Mintel Global New Products Database (GNPD), there has been a delicious 23% rise in Easter chocolate launches over the past year* providing a plethora of chocolate choice for Easter egg hunts across the globe. The countries leading the way in Easter chocolate innovation include Brazil, which accounted for 11% of global Easter chocolate product launches in 2017, followed by the UK, South Africa, Germany (each with a 10% share) and France (9%).

Reflecting the importance of seasonal products as a whole, in 2017, almost a quarter (23%) of global chocolate launches were positioned as seasonal, such as Christmas, Easter, Valentine’s Day and Halloween.

Overall, the US and Germany lead in terms of total chocolate new product development (NPD), each accounting for 8% of new product launches in 2017. This is followed by France (7%), the UK (5%) and Brazil (4%).

Marcia Mogelonsky, Director of Insight, Mintel Food and Drink, said:

“Easter represents one of those ‘permissible indulgence’ moments where consumers enjoy giving and receiving chocolate treats. The holiday also marks a time for increased innovation in confectionery as consumers seek new and novel products. In the UK, for example, Easter eggs flavoured with beer or stout, which were the rage in past years, have given way to new alternatives such as gin-and-tonic flavoured eggs. In Germany, the introduction of vegan Easter bunnies and eggs reflects the growing popularity of a plant-based diet in that country.”

Brits top of the chocs

Across the globe, it seems no one loves chocolate quite as much as the Brits. The average Brit devoured 8.4 kg worth of chocolate in 2017. Hot on the heels of the Brits, Switzerland consumed 8.3kg, closely followed by Germany at 8.2kg. Within the top 10 chocolate per capita consumers, Russia experienced the biggest increase at 2.2%; meanwhile, Austria reported the sharpest decline at -1.9%.

Consumers ditch calories in favour of a permissible bite

While the lure of chocolate remains strong, it seems many consumers are enjoying it with an element of self control. According to Mintel GNPD, global launches of chocolate products described as “bites” have grown 50% over the past five years; with “thins” not far behind, increasing 48% over the same period.

But just as bite-sized formats are increasing in popularity, consumers are losing their appetite for “light” versions of confectionery (such as low-sugar or low-fat varieties). Launches of products described as “light” fell by 22% between 2013 and 2017.

“The growth of bite-sized chocolate points to the ongoing trend of permissible indulgence. Pre-measured, 100 calorie packs of chocolate or other treats have fallen from favour as consumers move away from diets that focus on strict calorie counts. Offering consumers a ‘bite’ or a ‘thin’ piece of chocolate provides an easier way to measure intake, and one that allows for a bit of wiggle room,” adds Marcia.

Strong interest in vegan chocolate confectionery

Mintel research highlights considerable potential for vegan chocolate across Europe. More than half of chocolate eaters in Spain (55%), France (53% ) and Poland (53%) are interested in vegan chocolate, with their counterparts in Italy (48%) and Germany (44%) lagging only slightly behind. Vegan confectionery is also slowly being introduced into the UK: in 2017, 8% of chocolate launches in the UK were vegan.

“There’s currently a focus on plant-based eating in the chocolate sector. Manufacturers have responded to the growing interest in plant-based diets by replacing dairy milk with nut- or grain-derived milks in milk chocolate products. In some markets, this may be responding to a potential, but not yet articulated need,” Marcia concludes.

*March 2017-February 2018

Cadbury recalls some chocolate blocks because of plastic find

Chocolate maker Cadbury has recalled some Caramilk chocolate blocks because pieces of plastic have been found in some of them.

The company said in a statement the products affected are 190g Cadbury Caramilk chocolate block sold in Australia only with best before dates of 17/01/2019 and 21/01/2019.

The recalled product has been available for sale in Coles, Woolworths, IGA’s and independent retailers (VIC only) in NSW, QLD, VIC, SA, TAS and WA.

Products containing plastic may cause minor injury if consumed. Analysis of the samples received to date has determined that this product does not appear to pose a serious health or food safety risk, but the quality and safety of our products, as well as our consumers, is our first priority and a recall has been initiated to prevent the risk of minor injury.

Affected product should not be consumed and should be returned to the place of purchase for a full refund – no proof-of-purchase is required.

No other Mondelēz International or Cadbury brand or product is affected. Cadbury Caramilk

products sold in New Zealand and all other Caramilk products sold in Australia with different best before dates, are not affected by this recall.

Consumers are asked to call our consumer relations centre on 1800 034 241 if they have any further inquiries.

 

Iconic Violet Crumble returns to Australian hands

Nestlé Australia  has entered into an agreement with Adelaide-based family business Robern Menz to sell the Violet Crumble brand for an undisclosed sum. Under the sale, Robern Menz will acquire the brand and its associated intellectual property, plant and equipment.

Nestlé General Manager Confectionery, Martin Brown said: “The sale of the Violet Crumble brand to Robern Menz recognises that they are well positioned to combine their existing honeycomb manufacturing with that of Violet Crumble and continue to invest behind this well-loved brand.

“We are delighted that the history and tradition of this iconic Australia brand will continue under the ownership of a strong, Australian owned business.

Robern Menz CEO, Phil Sims said the company is excited to have partnered with Nestlé and reached an agreement to acquire what is undoubtedly one of Australia’s great brands.

“As the new gatekeeper of Violet Crumble, we are aware of the responsibility that comes along with owning a brand so highly regarded in the Australian market place,” he said.

“We are fiercely passionate about Australian brands and with a significant honeycomb business of our own, the opportunity was too good to pass on. With our expertise, we can ensure that Violet Crumble is produced with no change to the recipe, and with the same passion and affinity Australians have had towards the brand since 1913.”

Manufacture will transfer to the Robern Menz factory in Adelaide, South Australia in the coming months. The product has been manufactured at the Nestlé factory in Campbellfield, Melbourne since 1983. There will be no changes to staffing at the Nestlé factory. Nestlé invested $8m in the factory in 2017 to grow key locally manufactured chocolate brands and support growing KitKat exports.

Crowd funding secures Kiwi chocolate factory

In less than two days New Zealanders have opened their wallets and purchased Dunedin-based chocolate company OCHO, championing a new people-led model of regional development.

3570 people from across New Zealand purchased shares to the value of NZ$2,000,000 which will allow the company to expand it production and create new jobs.

This community-driven initiative began as a response to Mondelez announcing it planned to close Dunedin’s Cadbury factory. Initially Jim O’Malley and a team of volunteers aimed to purchase the Cadbury factory to keep confectionery production in the city. However, ‘Own the Factory’ has advanced its strategy to focus on premium chocolate-making, joining forces with independently owned OCHO and in the process developing a model for community business ownership to contribute to regional development.

Campaign leader Jim O’Malley said people had spoken to him about investing in OCHO to ensure Dunedin retained its proud history of chocolate production. They also wanted to enable new jobs in the city.

“We achieved our aim of attracting multiple shareholders and are delighted to have more than 3700 owners,” he said.

He said the offer was different to usual shares as it limited the total any one person could own to 11 per cent so that no single investor could dominate. The constitution also prevents OCHO moving its production outside of Dunedin.

OCHO founder Liz Rowe, who is the General Manager of the new company, says the first task will be ordering new chocolate production equipment from Italy. Once the order is confirmed planning will start on fitting out a new OCHO chocolate factory in Dunedin’s Steamer Basin.

“New equipment and a larger facility will enable us to expand our production from 90kg of chocolate a week to up to a maximum of 200kg a day,” she said.

OCHO’s plan for the first year is to focus on increasing production. Once that has been achieved the company will develop a tourism component with a factory tour and chocolate tastings. The third phase of its strategy is developing export markets.

 

Swiss invent new pink chocolate

Swiss chocolate maker Barry Callebaut has come up with a new type of chocolate ‘Ruby’ which is made from the Ruby cocoa bean. Ruby chocolate has an intense taste and characteristic pinkish colour.

The Ruby bean is unique because the fresh berry-fruitiness and colour precursors are naturally present. The cocoa beans are sourced from different regions of the world. The bean has a specific set of attributes, which Barry Callebaut managed to unlock through an innovative process that took many years to develop.

According to quantitative research performed by independent international market and consumer agency Haystack, Ruby chocolate meets a consumer need no chocolate ever did before. It’s expected that Ruby, like Dark, Milk and White chocolates will be introduced in different product categories.

The invention of Ruby chocolate is the work of global R&D centers of Barry Callebaut, based in France and Belgium – part of a global network of 28 R&D centers- , the Jacobs University, and over 175 years of expertise in sourcing and manufacturing.

The fourth type in chocolate offers a totally new taste experience, which is not bitter, milky or sweet, but a tension between berry-fruitiness and luscious smoothness. To create Ruby chocolate no berries or berry flavor, nor color, is added.

Ruby chocolate has been tested and validated through extensive consumer research run by independent global research agencies Haystack and Ipsos in the UK, US, China and Japan.

As part of these studies, Ruby’s consumer appeal and purchase intent have been tested, indicating consumers would buy Ruby chocolate at different price points.

 

Cadbury cuts 50 jobs in Tasmania

Fifty workers from Cadbury’s Hobart factory will lose their jobs as the chocolate maker spends $75 million to upgrade the facility.

The job losses represent more than 10 per cent of its Hobart workforce. The company’s parent Mondelez said in a statement most of the job losses, which will happen before the end of the year, are likely to be voluntary redundancies.

“Our team here has worked hard to help us become more efficient, cut costs and improve our competitiveness and as a result, we’ve reduced the cost of converting raw materials into a block of chocolate by 12 per cent,” said Amanda Banfield, Area Vice President.

“But while progress has been made, increasing local and global competition, low domestic growth, rising costs, and Australia’s distance from overseas markets make it difficult to compete against the likes of European factories with lower costs.

“To remain competitive, we need to improve our conversion costs by 30 per cent, plus continue to raise the bar as competition increases further.”

The company said it will realise more efficiencies through investment in new technologies, equipment and automation, plus increase the skills and capabilities of its people and ensure its teams are the right size.

The $75 million upgrade will take place over the next 18 months.

 

New factory for Haigh’s Chocolates

Haigh’s Chocolates will spend more than $10 million on a new state-of-the-art chocolate processing plant at Mile End. The upgrade is scheduled to be completed by the end of the year.

As the business remains committed to its bean to bar artisan production methods, without disrupting supply, the new facility will utilise the latest machinery, technology and software.

The fourth-generation business will focus on ensuring it can meet increasing interest and demand across its eastern seaboard stores as well as online.

Since launching in Adelaide in 1915, Haigh’s has expanded to operate stores across South Australia, Victoria, New South Wales and online.

Haigh’s Chocolates has since announced it will also unveil its seventh store on Elizabeth Street Melbourne later this year, just in time for Christmas. This will mark the 16th store for Haigh’s Chocolates.

Haigh’s Chocolates is committed to the art of premium chocolate making from the raw cocoa bean. It holds international UTZ certification for ethical and sustainable practices.

Annual turnover in the past six years has grown to over $50 million with production increasing to 750 tonne last year.

Kitkat Secret Garden

Kitkat has collaborated with former MasterChef contestant, Reynold Poernomo, to craft a limited edition chocolate dessert – Kitkat Secret Garden.

Using his expertise and passion for innovative sweet treats, Rey’s latest creation celebrates three flavour combinations from the new ‘Inspired By KitKat Chocolatory’ range.

The three new flavours – Mint Cream & Cookie Smash, Caramel Burst & Sea Salt and Espresso Biscuit & Ganache – have been influenced by popular bespoke creations made in the Kitkat Chocolatory in Melbourne.

The dessert features a large gold-dusted chocolate sphere which can be literally smashed open, to reveal the decadent layers within.

The dessert is served with Kitkat Espresso Biscuit & Ganache gelato and a nitrogen mousse, topped with micro mint and chocolate crumble.

The  range is available now in 140g block format at Coles and independent retailers including IGA.

 

Mars launches M&M’S Block chocolate range

Australians are set to become the first in the world to taste the new M&M’S Block chocolate range.

This chocolate innovation will combine M&M’S with smooth milk chocolate crafted from the finest ingredients, in six varieties – Milk, Almond, Hazelnut, Crispy, Crispy Mint and Strawberry.

The new range will tempt chocolate lovers, by bringing the iconic brand to Australia’s favourite chocolate segment. It will be available in all major supermarkets and convenience stores from Monday 24 April.

Yowie’s sales up in March quarter

Confectionary maker Yowie Group has reported sales of $US5.9 million ($A7.8 million) in the March quarter, a 50 per cent increase over the previous corresponding period.

According to AAP, this is the company’s highest-ever quarterly sales result.

The result follows the re-launch of the Yowie brand in Australia last week.

According to Universal Candy, Yowie’s distribution partner in Australia and New Zealand, the response from retailers has been  positive and the products are now available across a range of retailers representing the grocery, convenience, oil and convenience, department and toy store channels.

Yowie chocolates – based on the Australian mythical indigenous creatures – were originally introduced in Australia by Cadbury in 1997 before being discontinued in mid-2005.

The brand then made a comeback and Yowie products were released in the US in 2014.

“Australia was a logical choice to begin our expansion outside of the US because of strong residual brand awareness and consumers love and affinity for the Yowie brand,” said Bert Alfonso, Yowie Group’s Global Chief Executive Officer.

 

Chocolate maker eyes top-end Chinese market

Since China is most likely to become the world’s largest gourmet chocolate market, Barry Callebaut’s gourmet business in China is busy catering to the needs of chocolatiers, pastry chefs, bakeries, hotels, restaurants and caterers, the company said.

The Barry Callebaut Group, the world’s leading manufacturer of high-quality chocolate and cocoa products for the food industry, has strengthened its capabilities and expanded its offerings to meet the needs of the fast-growing segment of professional users of chocolate in China.

Gourmet products chocolate and cocoa products that are typically used by professionals such as chocolatiers, pastry chefs, bakeries, hotels, restaurants and caterers have fueled the business growth of Barry Callebaut in China which has doubled in volume over the last four years.

According to George Zhang, Managing Director for Barry Callebaut in China, higher disposable income of the rapidly growing middle- to high-income consumers in China will drive the expected growth in the sales of gifts as well as premium and sophisticated gourmet chocolate products in the coming years.

Zhang also said that consumers seek new chocolate trends, for example chocolate with health benefits, new tastes such as green tea flavor chocolate and innovative chocolate forms for a variety of exciting chocolate experiences.

The USD$ 2.8 billion chocolate confectionery category in China is estimated to grow to approximately USD$ 3 .9 billion by 2021.

 

 

Home grown highlighted in Chocolate Show

The search is on for the country’s best producers and chocolatiers with entries now open for the 2017 Callebaut Sydney Royal Chocolate Show run by the Royal Agricultural Society of NSW (RAS).

Local legends are in the spotlight with four new classes dedicated to Australian grown products out of 22 classes covering Chocolate Blocks, Individual Chocolates, Boxed Chocolates, Truffles, Chilli Chocolates, Student Exhibits and Handcrafted Showpiece.

While the Show requires all products to be manufactured in Australia, the new classes stipulate that 85 per cent of an exhibit must also be made from Australian grown ingredients.

Jodie Van Der Velden from Josophan’s Fine Chocolates and The Gingerbread House Katoomba will be Chair of Judges for her fifth year in row and said the new categories are important to recognise an evolving area.

“The production of chocolate from Australian grown cacao is a very new and emerging industry, and it’s great to be able to provide a platform for growers and manufacturers to have their efforts recognised,” Ms Van Der Velden said.

“Providing a category particularly for Australian grown and made chocolate, creates a more level playing field for chocolate makers to benchmark their product against their own specific industry peers.”

The Show enables chocolate manufacturers and chocolatiers to showcase their products, receive individual expert feedback and find out where they sit in the Australian market.

“This is a fantastic forum to bring together the country’s best and this process encourages the best from our industry leaders, provides an opportunity for both innovation and learning, and offers fantastic rewards for outstanding produce.

“This can only help to improve the future of Australian chocolate manufacturing, pushing forward creativity, quality and commitment to creating higher quality produce,” she said.

In addition to a coveted Sydney Royal medal or trophy, more than $12,000 in prizes is also up for grabs including a course at the Savour Chocolate & Patisserie School in Melbourne for the Champion Chocolate – Student.

A five-day Cocoa tour in Ghana, West Africa will also be presented to the Champion Chocolate and Champion Chocolate Showpiece winners thanks to Callebaut ‘The Original Belgian Chocolate’ and Australian importer F. Mayer Imports.

Entries close Wednesday, 10 May 2017 for the Show which runs from 22-23 August 2017.

Cocoa Industry announces plan to end deforestation

Twelve of the world’s leading cocoa and chocolate companies, including Hershey and Nestlé, have agreed to an initiative to end deforestation in the global cocoa supply chain.

The agreement, concluded in London during a meeting hosted by Prince Charles, commits the companies to develop and present a joint public-private framework of action at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Bonn in November. The initial focus of the initiative will be on top cocoa producers Ivory Coast and Ghana.

The companies included in the initiative are Barry Callebaut; Blommer Chocolate Company; Cargill; CEMOI; ECOM; Ferrero; The Hershey Company; Mars, Incorporated; Mondelēz International; Nestlé; Olam and Touton.

Also present at the meeting were ministers and senior government representatives of Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana, as well as France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway and the United Kingdom.

“…the most powerful direct reason for action is that deforestation threatens to undermine the very resilience of the cocoa sector itself, and with it the livelihoods of the millions of smallholders who depend on it,” Prince Charles said at the meeting.

“I am heartened that companies are undertaking to work up, in full collaboration with host governments and civil society, a joint framework of action to make good on the commitments announced today…”

John Sauven, Executive Director, Greenpeace UK welcomed the initiative.

“This initiative to stop cocoa production destroying forests must be warmly welcomed. The threats to biodiversity, the climate and local people will not be stopped by environmentalists chasing industry from forest to forest or commodity to commodity. The solution that would protect forests in Indonesia or Côte d’Ivoire would also work in other threatened biomes like Brazil’s savannah forests in the Cerrado,” said Sauven.

“It doesn’t matter whether the forest is being destroyed for cocoa, animal feed or palm oil. What matters is how industry responds. Business leaders must work together to stop their supply chains driving deforestation. This action by the cocoa industry brings us one step closer to that goal.”

Luna New Year KitKats

To celebrate one of Australia’s biggest cultural events, KitKat Chocolatory has created 500 Special Edition Lunar New Year gift sets, featuring a modern twist on traditional Asian flavours.

Sculpted around the classic KitKat wafer, chocolatiers have taken inspiration from the region to create specialty flavours celebrating the Year of the Rooster, including Red Bean and Toasted Coconut, and Citrus Crème Brulee.

Each Chocolatory Lunar New Year gift set contains eight individually wrapped single pieces, encased in a bespoke bamboo box.

Special Edition gift sets are available exclusively in store at Melbourne Central from Thursday 19th January.

Nestlé Head of Marketing – Confectionery Anna Stewart said, “It’s no secret that KitKat Chocolatory is an innovator and expertly experiments with flavours. This year, we wanted to celebrate a vibrant tradition in Australia by fusing ingredients from different countries.

“In celebration of Lunar New Year, we’ve created a unique chocolate experience to mark the start of spring in many cultures. KitKat enthusiasts can share prosperity, wealth, and success in 2017 with limited Special Edition gift sets,” said Stewart.

On Sunday 29 January at 11.30am, the company invites friends and family to Melbourne Central, to experience an official store blessing and lion dancing to celebrate Lunar New Year.

Meridian and Whittaker’s celebrate commitment to renewable energy

New Zealand chocolate maker Whittaker’s and Meridian Energy have launched a Special Edition Giveaway ‘Brooklyn Block’ chocolate to celebrate their new partnership, which is based on a shared commitment to renewable energy.

Whittaker’s has chosen Meridian as its electricity provider because it only generates power from 100 per cent renewable energy sources – wind and water.

“The celebration Brooklyn Block is named after Meridian’s iconic Brooklyn Turbine, which alone generates enough electricity to power 60 per cent of Whittaker’s total chocolate production each year. We love the fact that Meridian only generate from pure ingredients, like Wellington wind,” said Whittaker’s Marketing Manager, Holly Whittaker.

The partnership with Meridian also provides an opportunity to identify any potential energy efficiency options that may contribute to continuous improvement in Whittaker’s sustainable business practice.

“Customers have choice – whether it’s over chocolate or electricity. Whittaker’s share our commitment to the best ingredients and best business practices, with renewable energy at the heart of both. This can make a real difference for customers,” said Meridian’s Neal Barclay.

As well as a shared commitment to renewable energy, there is a natural synergy between Whittaker’s and Meridian, with both companies being Wellington-based and known for their engagement with consumers and communities.

Over the next week Whittaker’s and Meridian will join forces to provide some unique opportunities for consumers with some great prizes including the Brooklyn Block and a year’s free electricity up for grabs. The Brooklyn Block is exclusively available in select Brooklyn stores and via a limited Whittaker’s and Meridian giveaway.

 

Nestlé finds way to makes less sugar taste just as good

 

Nestlé researchers have found a way to structure sugar in such a way that, even when much less is used in chocolate, the tongue perceives an almost identical sweetness to before.

The discovery will enable Nestlé to significantly decrease the total sugar in its confectionery products, while maintaining a natural taste.

“This truly groundbreaking research is inspired by nature and has the potential to reduce total sugar by up to 40% in our confectionery,” said Stefan Catsicas, Nestlé Chief Technology Officer.

“Our scientists have discovered a completely new way to use a traditional, natural ingredient.”

Nestlé is patenting its findings and will begin to use the faster-dissolving sugar across a range of its confectionery products from 2018 onwards.

The company expects to provide more details about the first roll-out of reduced-sugar confectionery sometime next year.

The research will accelerate Nestlé’s efforts to meet its continued public commitment to reducing sugar in its products.

It is one of a wide range of commitments the company has made on nutrition. This includes improving the nutritional profile of its products by reducing the amount of sugar, salt and saturated fat they contain, while at the same time as increasing healthier nutrients such as vitamins, minerals and whole grain.

 

Cacao Bliss chocolate drink

Morlife’s Cacao Bliss chocolate drink contains functional ingredients, such as cacao, maca, inulin, lemon balm, eleutherococcus and ginkgo, making it the perfect drink to enjoy and relax with… especially after a busy day.

This drinking powder incorporates the taste of cacao, coconut and lucuma with subtle hints of carob. It can be enjoyed hot or cold, at any time of the day.

Manufacturer: Morlife

Launch date: August 2016

Ingredients (average quantities):

Organic Cacao Powder (27.8%*), Coconut Powder (15.7%*), Organic Lucuma (8.6%*), Cocoa Powder, Xylitol, Strawberry powder, L-Glutamine (4%*), Natural Chocolate Flavour (4.0%), Inulin, Carob (3.4%*), Maca extract (3.3%*), Lemon Balm Extract (3.2%*), Himalayan Salt, Magnesium Citrate, Natural Vanilla Flavour (0.5%), Eleutherococcus Extract (0.3%*), Bacopa Extract, Ginkgo Extract (0.13%*), Steviol Glycosides, Guar Gum.

Shelf Life: Two years

Packaging: 150g foil pouch

Product Manager: Sahar Marvasti

Country of origin: The chocolate drink is manufactured in Australia from local and imported ingredients

Website: www.morlife.com

 

Cacao Tea

Loose leaf chocolate tea made from 100% cacao husk with no artificial colours, flavourings or additives. A cup of this delicate chocolate infusion is filled with antioxidants, vitamins & minerals that will nourish and uplift.

Perfect for that 3.30pm afternoon slump, as an after dinner treat or in your morning smoothies. A great alternative to coffee or chocolate.

 Manufacturer: kkäo Co.

Launch date: 28th July 2016

Ingredients:

  • 100% Natural Cacao Husk
  • Caffeine Free
  • GMO-Free
  • Gluten Free
  • Sugar Free
  • Vegan Friendly
  • No Artificial Additives
  • Ethically Sourced

Shelf Life: 1 year

Packaging: Zip Lock Pouch

Brand Website: kkao.co

 

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