Food cold chain education needed and is coming soon

A new training initiative based on the thermometer is about to be introduced to the Australian cold chain industry. It is seen as a practical move to help combat the country’s serious food loss and wastage problem, estimated to cost the country nearly $4 billion a year at farm gate value.
The Australian Food Cold Chain Council (AFCCC), the peak advocacy body comprising concerned industry leaders covering refrigeration assets, transport and food distribution, will release an online education program, Thermometers and the Cold Chain Practitioner this month.
The program is aimed squarely at those the AFCCC regards as the super heroes of the food cold chain process – the people who oversee the movement of food through refrigerated transports, loading docks and cold rooms across the nation.
Industry research convinced the AFCCC that Australia desperately needed a new Cold Food Code that should be adopted by industry to stimulate a nation-wide educational push to bring Australian cold chain practices up to the much higher international standard.
The educational program starting with temperature measurement is the first of a planned five-code series.
The AFCCC has invested in new online education software that will be used to develop training programs to support the release of the actual Code document that will cover temperature technologies and how they should be used for monitoring a variety of foods carried in the cold chain.
The initiative runs alongside the work being done by other authorities, including Food Innovation Australia (FIAL) and the Commonwealth Government, which has signed up to a United Nations treaty to halve food wastage by 2030.
Some of the rising levels of national food wastage is considered to be the result of poor temperature management, and poor understanding of how refrigeration works in a range of storage environments. This includes from cold storage rooms through to trucks and trailers, and even home delivery vans.
Australia has world-class refrigeration and monitoring technologies, but the AFCCC believes industry will have to adopt serious training programs so that those responsible for moving food and pharmaceuticals around the country can get the best out of the available technologies.
Because of the vast distances in this country, food transport is a series of refrigerated events, in the hands of a range of stake holders.
Mangoes picked in the Northern Territory may be handled through stationary and mobile refrigerated spaces as many as 14 times by multiple owners on a 3,400 km journey to Melbourne.
If temperature abuse through poor refrigeration practices occurs in just one of those spaces, the losses at the consumer end are compounded, and shelf life can be either drastically reduced, or result in the whole load being sent to landfill.
People working at the coalface of the industry can sign on independently to do the course, which the AFCCC believes will be an important next phase in their professional journey. Kindred organisations involved in the cold chain will be encouraged to become retailers of the education program. Many industry groups have already signed up to help drive cold chain practitioners to the training program from their own websites.
There will only be modest charges for the course, which will help fund AFCCC’s continuing work on assembling the research and expertise to complete further parts of the overall Code of Practice. This will ultimately be gifted to the cold chain industry for the purposes of universal adoption.
The extent of food wastage in this country should not be under-estimated.  It is almost criminal that one quarter of Australia’s production of fruit and vegetables are never eaten and end up in land fill or rotting at the farm gate. This loss alone accounts for almost two million tonnes of otherwise edible food, worth $3 billion.
A government-sponsored study released earlier in 2020 revealed that meat and seafood waste in the cold chain costs the country another $90 million and dairy losses total $70 million.
It’s not just the wasted food at stake. The impacts on greenhouse emissions, water usage and energy consumption will end up being felt nationwide.
The AFCCC was formed in mid 2017 by a cross section of industry leaders covering manufacturing, food transport, refrigeration and cold chain services.
The Council sees itself as an important part of the solution, encouraging innovation, compliance, waste reduction and safety across the Australian food cold chain.
The new Council is not about promoting an industry – it wants to change the industry for the better. It acknowledges that Australia’s track record in efficient cold food handling, from farm to plate, is far from perfect.

Karma Drinks looks to raise capital

COVID-19 hasn’t stopped Kiwi organic drinks maker, Karma Drinks, raising money to accelerate its New Zealand growth plans and ambitions for new product development (NPD).
Co-founded in Grey Lynn, Auckland in 2012 by Simon Coley and brothers Chris and Matt Morrison, the organic and Fairtrade beverage company was formed with the vision to produce ethically sourced drinks (including sodas, juices and kombuchas), with a portion of the proceeds from each bottle going back to the cola growers’ families via the Karma Foundation.
Karma Drinks co-founder, Chris Morrison, says that despite what is a turbulent time, the organisation is committed to spreading good karma and continuing their global expansion and approach to innovation. Health and well-being are key drivers for their NPD strategy, especially as people have become much more health conscious and aware of what they are consuming.
Read More: Woolworths’ new $135 million Melbourne Fresh DC
“One of the most significant shifts in the global soft drinks market is to continuously satisfy customer desires with new product attributes. This will be a key component of our NPD strategy as we see significant opportunities to grow and diversify our customer base with an exciting pipeline of products to be released over the next few years.
“Whilst we’ve established ourselves as leaders in the organic fizzy drinks market, our plan is to now evolve our range to include health-focussed carbonated soft drinks, including natural energy drinks, plant-based drinks and a reduced sugar and no sugar range in our sodas,” said Morrison.
Karma Drinks is seeking to raise NZ$2m to progress their innovative NPD plans and also fund the company’s domestic growth strategy over the next three years, including re-capitalising strategic partnerships in the UK and plans to expand into Asia, Australia and the US.
Karma Drinks’ new CEO, Ben Dando, joined the company earlier this year, only two weeks before lockdowns hit the UK and New Zealand. Dando says despite the unpredictable and challenging start, the company is now on track for its strongest financial year in the last five years, having continued to innovate and navigate the company through these times.
“While COVID-19 has certainly shifted our strategy, our entire mission remains the same – continue to produce drinks that not only taste good but do good too. We’re determined to be a good example of how the food and beverage industry can continue to positively impact both the people and the planet despite challenging times. Our aim is to bring joy to our consumers, support our growers and bring the power of Karma to more consumers globally.”
“We have an exciting journey ahead, with huge ambitions and expansion plans for the brand, this capital raise will certainly help us achieve our goals and emerge as a stronger and better business post-pandemic,” says Dando.
The business generated approximately NZ$12m in sales last year and predicts to achieve NZ$19.7m sales by FY23 through this investment.

How the humble thermometer helps reduce food waste

A new training initiative based on the thermometer is about to be introduced to the Australian cold chain industry. It is seen as a practical move to help combat the country’s serious food loss and wastage problem, estimated to cost the country nearly $4 billion a year at farm gate value.
The Australian Food Cold Chain Council (AFCCC), the peak advocacy body comprising concerned industry leaders covering refrigeration assets, transport and food distribution, will release an online education program, Thermometers and the Cold Chain Practitioner this month.
The program is aimed squarely at those the AFCCC regards as the super heroes of the food cold chain process – the people who oversee the movement of food through refrigerated transports, loading docks and cold rooms across the nation.
Industry research convinced the AFCCC that Australia desperately needed a new Cold Food Code that should be adopted by industry to stimulate a nation-wide educational push to bring Australian cold chain practices up to the much higher international standard.
The educational program starting with temperature measurement is the first of a planned five-code series.
The AFCCC has invested in new online education software that will be used to develop training programs to support the release of the actual Code document that will cover temperature technologies and how they should be used for monitoring a variety of foods carried in the cold chain.
The initiative runs alongside the work being done by other authorities, including Food Innovation Australia (FIAL) and the Commonwealth Government, which has signed up to a United Nations treaty to halve food wastage by 2030.
Some of the rising levels of national food wastage is considered to be the result of poor temperature management, and poor understanding of how refrigeration works in a range of storage environments. This includes from cold storage rooms through to
trucks and trailers, and even home delivery vans.
Australia has world-class refrigeration and monitoring technologies, but the AFCCC believes industry will have to adopt serious training programs so that those responsible for moving food and pharmaceuticals around the country can get the best out of the available technologies.
Because of the vast distances in this country, food transport is a series of refrigerated events, in the hands of a range of stake holders.
Mangoes picked in the Northern Territory may be handled through stationary and mobile refrigerated spaces as many as 14 times by multiple owners on a 3,400 km journey to Melbourne.
If temperature abuse through poor refrigeration practices occurs in just one of those spaces, the losses at the consumer end are compounded, and shelf life can be either drastically reduced, or result in the whole load being sent to landfill.
People working at the coalface of the industry can sign on independently to do the course, which the AFCCC believes will be an important next phase in their professional journey. Kindred organisations involved in the cold chain will be encouraged to become retailers of the education program. Many industry groups have already signed up to help drive cold chain practitioners to the training program from their own websites.
There will only be modest charges for the course, which will help fund AFCCC’s continuing work on assembling the research and expertise to complete further parts of the overall Code of Practice. This will ultimately be gifted to the cold chain industry for the purposes of universal adoption.
The extent of food wastage in this country should not be under-estimated. It is almost criminal that one quarter of Australia’s production of fruit and vegetables are never eaten and end up in land fill or rotting at the farm gate.
This loss alone accounts for almost two million tonnes of otherwise edible food, worth
$3 billion.
A government-sponsored study released earlier in 2020 revealed that meat and seafood waste in the cold chain costs the country another $90 million and dairy losses total $70 million.
It’s not just the wasted food at stake. The impacts on greenhouse emissions, water usage and energy consumption will end up being felt nationwide.
The AFCCC was formed in mid 2017 by a cross section of industry leaders covering manufacturing, food transport, refrigeration and cold chain services.
The Council sees itself as an important part of the solution, encouraging innovation, compliance, waste reduction and safety across the Australian food cold chain.
The new Council is not about promoting an industry – it wants to change the industry for the better. It acknowledges that Australia’s track record in efficient cold food handling, from farm to plate, is far from perfect.

AFGC releases guide about opportunities in Indonesia

Australian food and beverage manufacturers will gain important new insights and information about export opportunities in Indonesia with the release of a new, specialised guide by the Australia Food and Grocery Council (AFGC).

Indonesia is already a top-10 export destination for Australia’s food and beverage sector and the Food and Beverage Export Guide to Indonesia will help Australian manufacturers understand and explore new opportunities as the market grows into the future.

AFGC Deputy CEO Dr Geoffrey Annison said the guide is a practical and data-driven tool that will help Australian food and beverage manufacturers expand the export opportunities in Indonesia.

“Indonesia is a growing market and the Indonesia Food and Beverage Export Guide is meant to serve as a tool to help Australian food and beverage exporters understand the Indonesian market with information on changing consumer behaviour, category insights, the regulatory landscape and listing key stakeholders in Indonesia.” Dr Annison said.

The COVID-19 pandemic of 2020 has highlighted both the importance and potential vulnerabilities of global food supply chains. As countries around the world deal with the fallout of the health crisis, governments are also focused on ensuring continued supplies of essential food and grocery products for their populations. The crisis has highlighted the importance of agricultural trade in maintaining food security and stable food prices.

“The recently completed Indonesia-Australia Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (IA-CEPA) will greatly facilitate closer trade relations and help build supply chains in both the countries. Indonesia is a top ten export destination for the Australian food and beverage sector and promises to be an important growth market. Improved market access and reduced barriers to trade enabled by IA-CEPA will help exporters realise this opportunity.” Dr Annison said.

The guide was funded by a grant from the Australian Government’s Department of Agriculture, Water and Environment and supported by the Australian Trade and Investment Commission (Austrade). The guide is a comprehensive and informative document and is based on research conducted by Euromonitor International.

Austrade’s Trade Commissioner (Jakarta) Tim Martin said, “IA-CEPA provides new opportunities for Australian businesses in Indonesia and further strengthens our export sector. This comprehensive report will be of great assistance for Australian food and beverage exporters exploring the Indonesian market.

“Austrade was pleased to support the development of this important market guide and looks forward to working with exporters in uncovering new opportunities in Indonesia.”

To create the most extensive exporter’s guide for Indonesia, Euromonitor International, a global and independent market intelligence firm, used local knowledge and data gathered in a methodology that included discussions with multiple market players, analysis of reports and statistics and physical and online store visits.

This methodology ultimately enabled Euromonitor to help develop an export guide for Australian food and beverage businesses with detailed information on Indonesia’s economic landscape, food and beverage market landscape, supply chains and regulatory framework for import procedures.

Euromonitor International Project Director, Jorge Rosas said, “It was a great opportunity to conduct this level of consultative research and illustrate the full extent of Euromonitor International’s research methodology on a project that will significantly assist Australian exporters to make informed decisions and to ultimately succeed.”

Free trade agreements and stability key reasons to invest in agricutlure

The commitment of Federal and State governments to make infrastructure spending a priority to stimulate the economy through COVID-19, is key to attracting investment into the agriculture sector, according to a new report from MinterEllison called Ahead of the Harvest, 2020-2022.

MinterEllison commissioned Acuris to survey 100 domestic and international investors in agriculture assets to gauge their appetite for investment in the sector and the most favourable conditions that attract investment. The survey was conducted pre-COVID-19, however many of the investors’ observations point to a sector that has strong foundations for attracting investor confidence as Australia rebounds from the economic downturn.

“The fast-tracking of infrastructure projects by State Governments and the Federal Government’s $1 billion Relief and Recovery Fund to support regions, communities and industry sectors (including agriculture) will contribute to a stable climate for future investment,” said MinterEllison partner Matthew Cunningham.

In particular, infrastructure investment will help with agribusiness’s market distribution. Also required is stable, reliable internet. It is encouraging that before those factors came into play, the infrastructure currently in place was considered more than adequate by respondents, with 65 per cent nominating it as a reason to invest.

“Superannuation funds have also expressed an appetite for investing in infrastructure, further demonstrating confidence in infrastructure as an important driver of economic recovery for the economy at large, and specifically the agriculture industry,” Mr Cunningham added.

Australia’s success in negotiating free trade agreements (FTAs) is highly regarded by investors with 72 per cent citing FTAs as Australia’s top advantage when considering agribusiness investment.

Crucial to Australia’s international competitiveness is its 14 FTAs in key markets across the Asia Pacific (including China, Japan and South Korea) and the United States. Australia also has signed and concluded, but not yet put in force the PACER Plus FTA between New Zealand and eight Pacific Island countries (Cook Islands, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Tuvalu) and is pursuing a further six (United Kingdom, European Union, India, the Gulf Cooperation Council, Pacific Alliance and the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership) that will open Australian agribusiness to export opportunities.

“Short term, these opportunities have been paused as global economies suffer the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, however, longer term, Australia’s negotiations to open more markets in the Asia Pacific region will be good news for agribusiness investors and mergers and acquisitions.” said MinterEllison partner, Glen Sauer.

Another key reason to invest in Australia’s agriculture sector is our political stability and legal certainty. Sixty-three per cent of respondents say governance, stability and transparency make Australia attractive for agribusiness investment. The cohesion between Federal and State governments in their response to COVID-19 through the National Cabinet has further emphasised Australia’s political stability during a time of crisis.

“Australia’s strong foundations, sound governance and transparency make it one of the safest places in the world to do business and with the politically bipartisan approach to infrastructure investment, this is unlikely to change in the near term,” said Mr Sauer.

“There is no doubt that COVID-19 has put a pause on the world’s focus on new M&A transactions and while it’s clear there will be significantly-reduced volumes of activity in the agriculture sector for the remainder of 2020, our expectation is that there will be a modest recovery in 2021, with further strengthening in 2022,” said Mr Sauer.

Medicinal cannabis was the sub-sector identified as having the most investment potential (85 per cent). The investment potential of viticulture was favoured by 74 per cent of investors.

Climate change and natural disasters were identified by 82 per cent of respondents as the main barrier to investment, closely followed by wage and other input costs (72 per cent). Australia’s ageing farmer population was identified as a challenge for the sector.

Australian native tea taking on the world

As native flavours grow in popularity in Australia, lemon myrtle and specifically lemon myrtle tea is emerging as a potential stand-out for international export.

It’s refreshing lemon flavour and enough antioxidants to rival black tea has positioned the Australian botanical as a new and unique ingredient for tea blends worldwide.

Following the recent expansion of its Australian plantations, Australia’s largest commercial grower, Australian Native Products, believes it is now poised to expand its offering on the global tea market, valued at more than $19.3 billion.

“We’ve seen Australian native lemon myrtle become increasing popular on Australian cooking shows and in some of our finest restaurants. However, it’s the health benefits of lemon myrtle that are really exciting for tea makers,” said Australian Native Products CEO, James Gosper.

“Lemon myrtle has more than 10 different antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds – more than many other herbal teas. In fact, it has similar antioxidant properties to black tea, but without the caffeine.

“Lemon myrtle also has a high level of citral, a potent antioxidant. It’s higher than lemongrass and other lemon scented herbals that are common ingredients in tea blends.”

Health benefits aside, the rich golden appearance and refreshing taste are also proving popular, with sensory researchers at the University of Queensland finding participants in a sensory study preferred the appearance, colour and flavour of lemon myrtle tea over green tea.

“Lemon myrtle leaves have an incredibly aromatic and complex lemon flavour profile. When dried into a tea, the flavour becomes a full-bodied, refreshing citrus tea that tastes and smells like the Australian bush. It’s like the taste of Australia in a cup of tea,” said Gosper.

“Leaders in the Australian gin industry like Four Pillars harnessed the richness of Australia’s native botanicals to create a unique flavour stamp for Australian gin. We think that same flavour opportunity exists for tea.”

Australian Native Products sustainably harvests more than 300 tonnes of lemon myrtle leaves each year and turns approximately a third of that into dried loose-leaf tea. As its North Queensland plantations mature over the next three years, the company expects production volume to substantially increase by 2021.

The plants themselves are sustainably grown, require no herbicides or pesticides and being native, are drought tolerant, using as little water in a year as a large household. Having successfully pioneered commercial lemon myrtle farming in Queensland, the company’s North Queensland plantations are also on track for organic certification by 2021.

The bi-products of the harvest are also utilised; turned into microfibre or a mulch which is scattered on the soil around young trees to return nutrients to the soil. This also prevents the growth of weeds and slows the evaporation of moisture from the area where the tree is planted.

“We try to mimic the conditions in subtropical rainforest soils, which is where lemon myrtle naturally grows, to ensure it is a long-term sustainable crop in Australia,” said Gosper.

“Lemon myrtle has been used by Indigenous Australians for thousands of years, but it’s really been in the last decade that interest in the plant and other Australian natives has started to grow – it ticks a lot of boxes not just on flavour but for its health benefits and sustainability.

“When international travel returns, we’re very keen to get lemon myrtle into the hands of more tea makers around the world,” said Gosper

Harvesting the benefits of lubricants in farm equipment

For cane and broadacre farmers, maximising crop yield is a constant challenge. To confront this challenge, farmers can turn to a number of different solutions, such as soil testing, changing chemical treatments, and better utilising fertilisers. A commonly under-utilised method, however, is to treat harvesters with better-quality lubricants.

“Essentially, you want to get the same level of cut from the start to the end of your paddock,” Gulf Western Oil’s National Account Manager, Christopher Bright, said.

“If you have a hydraulic fluid that is eternally shearing down, what happens is your harvester will drop its blades down to the ground, and then you’ll end up in a situation where you start picking up the dirt, or the bottom of the cane or the grain for example, which is not then able to be used for harvest.”

To maximise the level of the cut, and avoid that dropping effect, lubricants play a very important part.

“One of the products that we provide, the Gulf Harvester, is designed specifically for the harvester and to reduce the thinning effect that happens with hydraulic fluids over temperature – this controls the minimising shearing effect, therefore you get the same level of cut,” Bright said.

“One of the products that we provide, the Gulf Harvester, is designed specifically for the harvester with a new highly shear stable viscosity modifier that minimises the thinning effect that the fluid experiences as operating temperature increases, therefore you get the same level of cut throughout the day”, Bright said.

Recently, GWO reformulated the Gulf Harvester due to an advancement in the technology. In 2019, the fluid formula was changed to incorporate one of the most shear stable viscosity modifiers available in the global market.

The Gulf Harvester is a premium grade, high viscosity index, super shear stable hydraulic oil designed specifically for extreme applications where very high temperatures are common, such as cane harvesters. It is formulated with extremely shear stable additives offering minimal viscosity loss, minimal oxidation and thermal stability.

“Because of this, the Gulf Harvester outperforms its competitors, which are good products but they are still using the old technology before the advancements in 2019. So, they have that issue where, over time, they deteriorate and they shear down, which ultimately changes the cut,” Bright said.

“It’s like upgrading from a Plasma TV screen to an LCD. The market may be going well, but this is a significant enhancement. We’ve upgraded to one of the most shear stable viscosity modifiers available on the global scale.”

According to distributor BSC’s National Product Manager, Steve Keown, this technology is especially significant because farmers have a limited window in which to sow and harvest crops.

“The Gulf Western Harvester provides protection to the highly stressed hydraulics systems of the modern-day harvester, resulting in less time spent on maintenance and letting farmers get on with the job.”

Keown emphasised BSC’s presence in the Australian agriculture market – the company has been around since 1921. Moreover, ‘BSC AG’ is a newly developed division of BSC that has been created specifically for this market, wholly specialising in agricultural products for broad acre farmers. Alongside harvester lubrications, BSC distributes lubricants for all farm equipment.

“From heavy duty diesel engine, drive line and ancillary system lubricants, through to bespoke lubrication solutions, our customers rely on us to have a large amount of stock available,” Keown said.

With its national branch network, BSC has built a reputation as a respected distributor of products to the Australian agricultural market. Through BSC’s network, they have the capability to deliver parts directly to the farm.

The brand’s large presence means, not only that they have access to the significant technical expertise for bespoke solutions, but that they are agile one-stop shop for farm equipment, from procurement to maintenance and more. As such, BSC is constantly adapting to the changing demands of the market.

The relationship between BSC and GWO is ideal in that BSC can provide the support in the field and are available to customers 24/7, while GWO keep their pulse on the market with an ever-evolving line of high-quality lubricants.

“Harvesting and agriculture is the backbone of our business – it’s what we’re known for,” Bright said.

While Keown reiterates, “BSC customers rely on the advice we provide them as well as our ability to deliver products and services around the clock. We’re proud to have GWO in our portfolio as their products are of such a high standard.”

Read more articles like this at: www.lets-roll.com.au

                                               

How to grow overseas market share

Indonesia, Brunei, Cambodia, China, East Timor, Fiji, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Pakistan, the Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, the US and Vietnam – if there is one thing Trisco knows about, it’s exporting.

The Queensland-based company is a fifth-generation company that has been producing food and beverage products for more than 140 years and is always looking for new markets in which to expand.

CEO Mike Tristram has a plethora of dealing with the red tape and bureaucracies when sending products overseas. The first thing he points out is that no two countries are the same – whether they be first or third world. With some countries, getting approval is easy, another might be require more time, while yet others may rely on another country’s approval system.

READ MORE: Anthony Pratt: Value added food will pave way for Australian exports

“For example, the US,” said Tristram. “Officials in another country might say ‘well, if you’re approved by the FDA in the US, there’s no problems here’. Every country has its own little idiosyncrasies. In Pakistan, you need to have specific approval by some office that has to have a physical stamp. Trying to get that physical stamp instead of a photocopy and approval is very difficult. Dealing with those sorts of idiosyncrasies from country to country, can be interesting.”

One of Tristram’s favourite quotes is from LinkedIn founder, Reid Hoffman, who described start-ups as like jumping off a cliff and assembling an airplane on the way down.

“Exporting is a little similar but not quite as dramatic,” he said. “It is one of those things you have to figure out on your own depending on your market and depending on where you are going and what you have to sell. It is how unique or not unique it might be and where your strategic advantage is.

“You need the boldness to be able to go into the adventure and find your own pathway within that and be prepared to solve those problems as and when you see them. Even with speed bumps along the way, you need to keep going and learn from them and not give up.”

He believes resilience is the biggest thing that gets a company through the export journey. Also, it is important to get someone on the ground. It is not something that can be discovered, nurtured and expanded upon while sitting in an office in Australia.

“That is the hardest thing – staying on the path and keep slogging,” he said. “You can’t follow a market you don’t understand so you have to go there. And if you are not prepared to go there on a regular basis, then don’t attempt that journey. If you are not prepared to leave the country – at least initially and put a good bedrock down – you will not be successful.”

However, once the connections have been made, it is possible to tone down the travel schedule as long as there is someone on the ground that can be trusted. These are usually locals who know how local regulators and the laws surrounding imports work.
“Some of those places you can handle through agents once you have forged a relationship,” said Tristram. “As long as you have a trusting relationship with the local agent you can pull back a little on those sorts of visits.”

What does help is Australia’s reputation not only as a quality food producer, but as being upfront and honest.

“Australian products are recognised throughout the world as high quality,” he said. “And being relatively clean and green, we’re recognised as being reasonably easy to deal with and we are straightforward. There are a lot of advantages to being Australian.”

The main reason companies try and get into exporting is to grow their company financially. Australia has a finite number of markets within the continent, so expansion is the only way to grow. And while Trisco is happy to manufacture in Australia, the company is going one step further to magnify its footprint in the US – building a plant over there.

“One of the disadvantages is we are still one of the highest costs of manufacturing in the world,” said Tristram. “Until we solve some of these issues, such as energy and utility costs, we are going to continue to struggle. And until we are competitive with the rest of the world on red tape and tax and that sort of thing, there’s not a huge incentive to come to Australia and manufacture. We need to change that.”

One of the products that the company produces is Thick-N Instant, which is under the company’s Precise brand. It has been on the market for three years and doing well. It is designed for those who have dysphagia, which is a condition whereby people have difficulty swallowing. There are many different types of dysphagia, but it usually impacts on those who are aged over 65. It also has a high correlation with people who have Parkinson’s Disease, motor neuron issues or are a victim of a stroke.

“The market that manages the condition, thickens products to four distinct levels that are internationally recognised as part of the diet,” said Tristram. “We take those products up to those viscosities depending on what the problem is. Then they can swallow safely, which means the food goes into their digestive tract and not into their lungs, or into other areas that can cause fluid on the lungs, which can lead to pneumonia.”

It is this demand for the product stateside that lead the company to build a plant over there. Thick-N Instant is protected by intellectual property including patents, some of which are still pending.

“We need to build a plant a little closer to one of our largest customers in the US,” said Tristram.

“And we’ve done that for a couple of reasons. First, Thick-N Instant is a product that is unique and is for a vulnerable population and there is nothing like it in the world that we compete against. Nobody makes anything like it.

“The other issue for us is that you have to have some redundancy, so if something catastrophic happened to the plant we would be in trouble. You have to have that redundancy. Plus of course, seven to nine weeks on the water to another country is a long time for something that only has a shelf life of 12 months.”

Does Tristram feel the company has reached the apex of its export potential? No, but there are other issues he can see on the horizon

“The food industry is contracting a little bit,” he said. “What we are seeing now is ingredient suppliers not being as flexible as they used to be. The variety of the products on offer are there. They’re bringing them in from all over the world – Europe, Asia, US – everywhere.

“But getting consistent supply and variety that we can use to draw off the same sort of spec is becoming more difficult. For example, if you have 40 tonnes of strawberries and you need another 20 tonnes, trying to find it locally is going to be difficult.”

Bubs opens corporate headquarters in Victoria

The official opening of the corporate headquarters Bubs Australia Limited was held Friday 13 December at its Australian Deloraine Dairy canning and packaging facility in Dandenong, Victoria.

Danny Pearson, State Member for Essendon, Parliamentary Secretary to the Premier of Victoria, and Gabrielle Williams, State Member for Dandenong and Minister for Prevention of Family Violence, Minister for Women and Minister for Youth in the Victorian Government, signed the Official Certificate of Recognition commemorating Bubs establishing its headquarters in Victoria.

Parliamentary Secretary to the Premier Danny Pearson said: “We were delighted to support Bubs move to Victoria, which will add considerable weight to our reputation as Australia’s gateway to China. As well as creating jobs, this investment is yet another vote of confidence in our farmers and the Government’s work promoting Victoria as an export hub.”

Member for Dandenong Gabrielle Williams welcomed the arrival of Bubs Australia to  area: “Melbourne’s south-east is the heart of Victoria’s manufacturing industry and having Bubs choose Dandenong for its headquarters is important to local jobs and the broader supply chain.”

Commenting on the occasion, Bubs executive chairman, Dennis Lin said: “We are honored by the presence of two state members. Their participation recognises the contribution of Bubs to the state economy.

“Our relocation to Victoria was a vote of confidence in the state, its goat dairy farmers and its strategic position as a key export hub for Australia. We are truly excited that the management operations of Bubs Australia and its strategic supply chain partners are now so close together.”

Bubs Founder and CEO, Kristy Carr said: “We see integrating supply chain, production and management in Victoria as a natural progression which will help bring greater agility and scale efficiencies to our business.

“The move underlines the Company’s recently announced plan to increase investment in boosting cross border e-commerce with China, both for its existing portfolio and new products.

“By expanding the scope of our portfolio to new demographics we expect to generate further opportunities for growth among our Victorian farming partners who collectively represent the largest aggregation of milking goats in Australia.

“These Victorian goat dairy farms, exclusively contracted to Bubs, are capable of providing some 20 million litres of fresh goats milk from an aggregate herd of around 20,000 milking goats.

“Importantly, most of our other Australian based supply chain partners are also located in Victoria. In addition to our Deloraine canning and packing plant in Dandenong, Bega’s Tatura Industries in Victoria provides onestep goat’s milk blending and powder production and Fonterra’s facility in Darnum, also in Victoria, processes our grass-fed organic cow’s milk for packing at the Deloraine facility,” said Carr.

Also present at the ceremony was Mark Edmonson, one of Bubs’ Victorian goat farmers, based in Echuca, Victoria, whose goat farms provide Bubs with important domestic supply of goat milk under an exclusive supply agreement.

Edmonson said that he was very passionate about the goat industry and happy to be doing what he loves – supporting Australia’s Goat Industry which has been a lifetime goal.

“I’m very proud to be one of Bubs exclusive suppliers. With Bubs we now have the guaranteed off-take that gives us the security we need to put this passion into practice. With Bubs support we know we have a partner that understands our business model and how sustainability can make a difference as well as a partner committed to enabling us to have access to skilled, capable people and supporting the gaining of those skills for generations to come.”

China helps Murray River Organics grow

Murray River Organics today announced that exports of its products had increased by 27 percent year to date over FY2019 for the corresponding period and anticipates this trend will continue for the rest of FY2020.

China has been a major contributor to the increase, with sales to Chinese customers more than doubling in FY2020 since the same time last year, as MRG leverages the increasing demand in China for healthy foods.

Chief executive Valentina Tripp said there is more potential for MRG to grow exports to China following MRG’s recent launch on the WeChat platform in October 2019.

“WeChat is a very powerful tool used by more than a billion users each month which enables us to communicate directly with Chinese consumers, build brand awareness and share the Australian Organic Dried Vine Fruit provenance story as the largest Dried Vine Fruit grower in Australia,” Tripp said.

READ MORE: Of seahorses, eczema and organic food

MRG has been able to increase its market share [in Asian markets] with the introduction of its new branded product range across Greater China and South East Asia, which is part of the company’s “Taking Australia to Asia” growth strategy which was launched in 2018.

With ongoing concerns about food safety in Asia MRG believes Australia’s trusted clean and green reputation is also helping it to win new contracts.

The company has also re-entered the European market with high-quality Australian sultanas now being exported into the premium baking industries across Germany and Italy.

Tripp said that global demand for organic and conventional dried fruit remains strong and growing exports has been a major focus for MRG and the industry over the last 12 months.

“We have received significant support from Dried Fruit Australia, with its chairman, CEO and key board member, who are also growers, attending trade shows in China, Japan, Vietnam and Germany. They have been a great support in building international awareness of our high quality Australian sultanas. The feedback from those trade forums was that demand for Australia’s Dried Vine Fruit will continue to accelerate.”

Trade agreements critical to Australia’s regions and red meat jobs

The Australian red meat industry urged both sides of Government to proceed with ratification of two critical free trade agreements without delay, following today’s release of a Joint Standing Committee on Treaties (JSCOT) report.

The report (#186 tabled 9 October 2019) into the Indonesia-Australia Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (IA-CEPA) and Australia-Hong Kong Free Trade Agreement (A-HK FTA) determined that the IA-CEPA and the A-HK FTA are in Australia’s national interest. The Committee therefore recommended binding treaty action in both cases.

“The Australian industry strongly endorses the JSCOT outcomes for both the IA-CEPA and A-HK FTA,” said Red Meat Advisory Council (RMAC) Chair Don Mackay.

“Indonesia is a vitally important trading partner for the Australian live cattle and beef industry – along with a steady requirement for sheepmeat. Combined, the existing trade was worth over a $1 billion in 2018.

“The benefits of ratifying IA-CEPA and securing more trade certainty with a key export market are unsurpassed – particularly at a time of global trade disruption.”

In addition, the implementation of the A-HK FTA promotes a closer economic relationship between Australia and Hong Kong and will ‘lock in’ Australia’s current duty free access for red meat products.

“The A‑HK FTA will complement the benefits our sector has derived from the China-Australia Free Trade Agreement as well as Australia’s other trade agreements throughout Asia – bilaterally with Japan and South Korea, regionally with ASEAN and via the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP-11),” Mackay said.

“In 2018 alone, we exported just over 7,000 tonnes of beef to Hong Kong, worth $96 million, demonstrating the critical importance of diverse markets to returning prosperity back to Australia’s red meat businesses and regions.

“We applaud the efforts of the Australian Government in pursuing trade reform globally and look forward to the ratification of these two agreements in the Parliament, and the subsequent entry into force of both agreements at the earliest possible opportunity.

“Our industry represents in excess of 80,000 businesses and 405,000 jobs, with a large portion of these located in rural and regional Australia.

“For every 10 jobs in our industry, six rely on our trade with the world. Deals like the IA-CEPA are vital for these jobs and vital for our regions, especially Australia’s north.

“Trade agreements such as these are integral to helping ensure the cost competitiveness of the Australian supply chain – at a time of weather related challenges and mounting international competition.”

Safe flooring for dairy factories

According to the Australian Department of Agriculture, the country’s dairy industry accounted for $4.4 billion of Australia’s gross value of agricultural production and around seven per cent of the country’s export income. It has a reputation for producing good quality products that are in huge demand around the world.

In order to keep this reputation intact, the factories where food and beverages are produced have to adopt clean and safe working environments. Not only for the sake of the products themselves, but for the workers, too.

A key area of any factory is its floor space. The ever-demanding world of cheese and dairy manufacturing offer tough conditions for flooring in most facilities that produce and process the products. Typically, with the producers of milk and milk ingredients such as cheese, ice cream, butter, cream and yogurt, face a common challenge with concrete corrosion, as well as dangerous, damp and wet conditions, which are compounded by heavy impact traffic.

READ MORE: The right brew for beverage and distillery flooring

Dairy processing floors are exposed to aggressive acids and alkaline chemical cleaners, including Clean in Place (CIP) chemicals. Heavy-duty, epoxy-trowelled flooring from a company such as Roxset Health and Safety Floor Coatings handles a range of corrosive acids. This includes nitric and phosphoric acid typically found in processing and chemical storage areas. Milk and other ingredients break down on the floor, forming acidic by-products that can also damage the concrete. It is critical that companies protect their concrete from oils and chemical deterioration, while handling impact, abrasion and thermal cycling.

There are strict regulations in the dairy industry, which are required in order to meet Food Standards Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code (FSC) Standard 4.2.4. This is a primary standard that dairy farms must adhere to and follow assiduously. Food Standards Australia New Zealand, Standard 3.2.2 – Food Safety Practices and General Requirements states: “Floors must be designed and constructed in a way that is appropriate for the activities conducted on the food premises”.

When the facility gets wet, which is common in dairy production, it can lead to serious slip issues. This can escalate into expensive lawsuits if care and caution are not taken. It is critical that an anti-slip HACCP complaint aggregate is built into the full thickness of the floor. The profile of this would typically be between 6-10mm for maximum protection. Drains are important in tackling slip hazards where is it important to contour the falls with the correct anti-slip aggregates. It is these types of considerations that Roxset looks into when laying down epoxy flooring at factories that specialise in dairy products.

A dairy facility floor is also challenged by extremes, like cold conditions in the coolers and warm conditions in the processing raw milk and intake side.

This is where a potential for thermal shock and thermal cycling in the floor can occur leading to damage. A heavy-duty non-toxic HACCP epoxy coating from a company like Roxset will be sensitive to any shock. However, it can also handle very hot wash downs, which are also needed in order to keep a factory in excellent condition.

Seven things you should know when exporting to China

According to Dr Mathew McDougall, CEO of Reach China and revered expert in doing business with China, Australia’s trade relationship with China is growing by the day and it includes large scale exports of resources through to everyday items which small and medium size Aussie businesses are ideally placed to provide.

“China represents a huge opportunity for Aussie SMEs,” McDougall said. “We import over $62 billion worth of goods from China and export over $93 billion dollars worth of goods and services to China.

“China has a population of nearly 1.4 billion people and their middle class is growing. They are also avid online shoppers and eager to purchase premium quality brands. They also seek out authentic Australian brands as our products are considered high quality, clean, green and produced in highly regulated environments. Our soils, air and water are seen as pure.

READ MORE: Why the Australian food industry needs Alibaba

“The key areas of export opportunity for Aussie food and beverage small businesses include:

  • Maternity, baby care products and baby food
  • Milk powders (including infant formula and adult milk powder), UHT and pasteurised milk, yoghurt, cheese and butter
  • Seafood (particularly saltwater shell fish such as oysters, crabs, lobster and abalone)
  • Fresh fruits (citrus, table grapes, cherries and mangoes) and natural fruit juice
  • Oats and other breakfast cereals
  • Chilled, frozen beef and processed foods
  • Wine and craft beer

McDougall suggests that while the idea of exporting to China may seem daunting, many Australian businesses, from mum and dad operations to larger companies have commenced the journey of exporting to China with great success.

“It is really a matter of preparing well and taking the right steps,” Dr McDougall said. He has put together seven key steps Australian businesses should follow if they want to export to China.

  1. Work with an experienced export consultant to help you in your journey. A good export consultant will assist you to work through all steps of the process
    This is essential to ensure you are making the right decisions and doing the right things. This avoids putting money in the wrong places and minimising mistakes.
  2. Ensure your product is suitable for the Chinese market and that there is a demand for your product.
    While this may seem straight forward, China is a big country with different markets. Be clear about what part of the market you are targeting and the potential for sales and growth. The more unique and high quality, the more appealing the product will be.
  3. Get to know Chinese culture
    Get to know the market to which you are seeking to export. Find out what products are doing well and why. Understand their social media platforms such as WeChat and how they engage and shop. A little research goes a long way.
  4. Grow awareness of your products in the Australian market first to build brand credibility and trust in China
    Chinese consumers buy brands based on reputation, trust and credibility. If your brand is known in Australia and has a good reputation, then the Chinese are more likely to buy your product in or from China.
  5. Build a sound online presence through a good website and social media
    Chinese consumers are very internet savvy and research products before they buy. They also rely on reviews. Having a strong online presence ensures your brand is well represented and and findable on the internet.
  6. IP and branding
    Protecting your IP is important, not only in Australia but overseas. Ensure your products are clearly branded and IP registered in Australia and that the branding has no conflicts with any existing brands known or registered in China.
  7. Be patient, flexible and scalable
    Many businesses have achieved explosive growth exporting to China, while others have found the journey a bit more slow going. Regardless, it is important to ensure that you are taking the right steps and are prepared for growth when it happens.  Sometimes strategies and tactics need to be adjusted and this is normal, the key is to be patient and committed – and be ready when things do shift quickly.

“I have helped many Australian startups and larger businesses export into China. With many, we have drawn on the Australian based Daigou sector to get the export process underway,” McDougall said.

“Daigou are Australian based Chinese who buy products and send them back to their friends, relatives and others in China. There are over 80,000 Daigou in Australia and the Daigou trade channel is growing fast helping many Australian brands to build awareness among consumers in China.

“Regardless of the strategy, the key is to ensure you have a good product to sell There are many Australian businesses with good products that are ideal for export. Hopefully we see more making the move to export. It can be a life-changing experience.”

Australian and Chinese meat sectors sign MOU

A new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the Australian and Chinese meat sectors highlights the importance of China to Australian industry and underlines a commitment to collaboration on both sides, according to Australian Meat Industry Council CEO Patrick Hutchinson.

The MOU is the result of 18 months of preparations and discussions which kicked off at the China International Meat Industry Week in 2018.

AMIC CEO Mr Hutchinson signed The China Australia Red Meat Agreement (CARMA) MOU with the China Meat Association in Chengdu, China today on behalf of the Australian Meat Industry Council, Meat & Livestock Australia and the Australian Meat Processor Corporation.

“China is the biggest export market for Australian meat, and maintaining and enhancing our relationship with this critical partner is essential for the future of our industry. This MOU serves to reinforce the strong value our sector places on the relationship and our great respect for China as a very important trading partner,” he said.

DuPont enters collaboration on probiotics with By-Health in China

DuPont Nutrition & Biosciences has announced its intent to enter into a strategic collaboration with By-Health, a consumer health care company in China.

The strategic collaboration would focus on research and development of probiotic dietary supplements with “new functions, new ingredients and new technologies,” including joint research on intestinal microecology and the development of new probiotic dietary supplements and applications for use.

By-Health acquired Life-Space Group, an Australian probiotic enterprises, producing and marketing probiotic products for all life stages.

READ MORE: DuPont divests Natural Colors business to DDW

DuPont offers a range of clinically documented strains of probiotics under its DuPont Danisco portfolio to support digestive health, immune health, women’s health, oral health and more.

“At DuPont, we’re focussed on improving people’s everyday lives, and China is an important consumer market. With our expertise within probiotics and microbiome science, we’re delighted to partner with one of the leading consumer health care companies in Asia Pacific to develop new probiotics-based products to satisfy consumers’ growing demand for natural health and wellness solutions,” said Anders Grøn, DuPont vice presidentand global business director – Probiotics, HMOs, & Fibers.

Positive outlook for Australian fish stocks

A new report from the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES) has delivered generally positive news for wild fish stocks in Australian Government managed fisheries.

Acting ABARES Executive Director, Peter Gooday, said the latest Fishery status reports 2019 revealed 70 per cent of fish stocks reviewed were not overfished and not subject to overfishing.

“The reports reflect a generally stable trend of stock status, with only five stocks changing status from last year,” Gooday said.

“A jointly managed stock, striped marlin in the Western Tuna and Billfish Fishery, is now classified as both overfished and subject to overfishing, and Australia is working with the other fishing nations of the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission to try to rectify that.

“In fisheries solely managed by the Australian Government, no stocks were classified as subject to overfishing.

READ MORE: Why mass flow meters are important in fish farming

“However, a number of stocks in these fisheries remain classified as overfished and it is uncertain whether stocks will rebuild under current mortality rates. The
Australian Fisheries Management Authority continues to work with stakeholders on strategies for rebuilding these stocks.

“There is also a small proportion of stocks, in both Australian Government managed and jointly managed fisheries, that are now classified as uncertain due to outdated assessments or to changes in catch that need to be monitored.

“The reports also look at the economic performance of fisheries managed by the Australian Government, with $390 million generated in gross value of production (GVP) in 2017–18. This represents 22 per cent of the $1.79 billion GVP of Australia’s total wild capture fisheries.”

This report forms part of a suite of ABARES publications that provide a comprehensive and multidimensional account of the trends and outlook for Australian fisheries.

A2 disruption to milk market not a bad thing

A2 milk had a rocky start when New Zealand businessman Howard Paterson and research scientist Dr Corran McLachlan founded the A2 Corporation in 2000. The milk, which claims to help reduce the risks of digestive problems, diabetes and heart disease because it is said to contain only A2 beta-casein, seemed to hit a nerve with people who were sceptical of its health benefits. Three years after the founding of the company, both men died, which left the company in a state of flux. It went through several highs and lows – including going into administration in late 2003 – before becoming The a2 Milk Company, which now is based in Australia. It is run by Jayne Hrdlicka, who started at the company just over 12 months ago.

Hrdlicka was the CEO of Qantas subsidiary Jetstar before joining the milk company, and has held positions at Ernst and Young, Bain & Co, and was a director of Woolworths between 2010-2016. At the Global Food Forum held in Sydney, Hrdlicka spoke about where A2 milk is headed, why it is seen as a premium brand in China, and the science behind the milk’s claims.

It’s a risky strategy to base your whole business model on one product – more so when some are a little uncertain of what makes it different from similar products. It’s share price has fluctuated over the past 12 months, but it does help when news gets out that discerning Chinese consumers think the milk is a premium brand. It has entered two of the most lucrative markets in the world – the US being the other – and Hrdlicka sees nothing but growth in the company’s near future.

READ MORE: A2 Milk expands range to make milk powder with Mānuka honey

“We’re not talking specific numbers, but we’re playing in the two biggest consumer markets in the world,” she said. “We’re building a deep franchise with those consumers and we’re really excited about what the possibilities bring to the brand and shareholders.”

When it comes to the science behind A2 milk, Hrdlicka makes no apologies about its brand strategy and indicates that it is the disruption that A2 milk is bringing to the marketplace that is causing the issue. Most of the noise about the benefits, or lack thereof, of the milk, is coming from those who have a vested interest in the milk not being commercially successful. The irony being that this is also keeping the brand in the spotlight, which is not a bad thing if you are Hrdlicka.

“We are quite comfortable with the company getting beaten up by big legacy players who feel uncomfortable because we are doing something different,” she said. “It happened in Australia, it happened in New Zealand. We expect it to happen everywhere we go and that is what happens when a disruptive approach to a category that has been around for a long time unfolds.

“It happened in aviation, and it is happening across all consumer products, not just milk. We expect that it is part of the process. The crazy part of it is that it draws consumer attention to the choices, including ours. It causes consumers to do their research and we’re the beneficiary. It is part of the process of evolving the category.”

Hrdlicka said the company worked hard in the early stages to ensure there was enough science for consumers to educate themselves. She said there are a number of studies that have been completed by independent research markets that came to similar conclusions that the founders of the company did.

“What is fantastic for us at the end of the day, is the impact it has on the consumers,” she said. “And consumers are telling us they are enjoying a functional benefit and they can enjoy fresh white milk again where they weren’t able to in the past. Or, they were fearful of the impacts of dairy products, and this has given them new confidence to re-enter the new category.”

What is helping the brand, and something not lost on investors, is its foray into the Chinese market. With milk powder a hot commodity, it seems the affluent middle class in the Middle Kingdom can’t get enough. Hrdlicka knows how important the market is, so much so that she spent her first week working for the a2 Milk Company in Sydney, then the second week in China. She goes up there every six weeks or so, not just to be seen, but also to meet with their partners, listening and learning on the ground and making sure the company’s strategy in the area is sound.

“We are doing some really exciting things in China,” she said. “We spent the first half of the financial year really understanding consumers, talking to mothers, talking to parents, talking to grandparents – really trying to understand the decisions they are making and how they we making them – where they like to shop. That gave us a lot of clarity on how to constructively build the brand and how to leverage our multi-channel strategy.”

And what about the US? Retail giant Costco started selling the milk in parts of the US at the end of the 2018, but Hrdlicka isn’t getting carried away just yet.

“We were deeply appreciative of Costco’s support in the US,” she said. “The success story for a2 milk in the US is in its early stages, but the signs are impressive. A2 milk is sold in 12,400 outlets across the country today and Costco is part of that story. It is taking the product to consumers who are interested in different pack sizes and are value driven, but they are a big and important format in the eyes of consumers and play a meaningful role in the repertoire. They are important players in the natural channel and they have helped us build our brand.”

Finally, there is the online presence of A2 milk. Hrdlicka knows that part of the company’s future success lies in the less tangible online marketplace.

“Alibaba is a really important trading partner of ours as is Amazon via its Whole Foods portal,” she said. “I will say, as a matter of course, that we are multi-channel company – ecommerce is a really critical channel for us as a business today and will be going forward. And if you listen to your consumers, it plays a really powerful role for them in their day-to-day lives. You don’t quite have the same choices in leveraging direct deliveries in Australia that you do in China and the US, but it is a changing canvas and digital players are changing the world for consumers at a very fast pace.”

The right brew for beverage and distillery flooring

The craft beer and distillery market in Australia is worth in excess of $4 billion and growing. Although currently dominated by North American brands, more exciting new craft brewers and distilleries are setting up rapidly throughout the country, with up to 600 brands now being available.

The Independent Brewers Association (IBA) estimates that there will be double-digit growth of 24.2 per cent for local craft beer through the liquor stores over the next 12 months, proving Australia has a growing appetite for quality beer and spirits. Wealthy investors and bankers also view the market as a key opportunity with the likes of Gerry Harvey recently investing $20 million to build Australia’s largest whisky company.

Similar to the building and construction of a winery, breweries and distilleries have parallel challenges in getting the floor coating just right.

The brewing process is subject to constant wear and tear and spills. This is driven by steam and boiling water creating a large swing in temperatures that the flooring needs to withstand. Following on from the production process, forklifts and pallet jacks are used to transport ingredients and finished brews to delivery trucks. This constant traffic movement can cause the floor to crack and peel and result in dangerous trip hazards, as well as a build-up in bacteria. A seamless heavy-duty, non-slip epoxy floor from a company like Roxset Health and Safety Flooring will protect from accidents and inhibit growth of bacteria and provide ease of cleaning.

READ MORE: Flooring meets strict food code requirements

Another key consideration with the final coating is erosion. Sugar solutions used in wine making and brewing rapidly erode concrete, which can leave the surface pitted and damaged resulting in expensive downtime and repairs. It also creates a hazardous working environment for workers.

Breweries, distilleries and wineries have a lot of rules and regulations they are required to follow, not just in terms of how they run overall, but their set-up, too.

Important requirements they must meet include:
• A brewery floor needs to be made of non-porous material, with no cracks and gaps.
• Flooring must have anti-microbial properties to prevent collection of bacteria and other harmful organisms and meet HACCP Compliance.
• Floor coating must be moisture and chemical resistant and not degrade quickly due to repeated exposure.
• Floor coating must work well in both wet and dry conditions.
• Floor coating should be non-slip and have low environmental impact.

The SE Floor Coating Solution from Roxset is a specialised tailored system to suit high impact wet areas for the food and beverage industry. Key clients over the past 30 years include, Ned’s Whisky, Capital Brewing, Vasse Felix Winery and Voyager Estate.

For consumers, breweries and distilleries are a cool place to hang out and see how the beverage is made and to sample offerings. But what they do not realise is the level of detail, which goes into every choice made. From the brewing of equipment to the flooring, everything needs careful consideration.

Roxset has the expertise and history to make sure all hygienic and safety concerns are met in distilleries, wineries and breweries. It works with clients so it can find a solution that will mean the floor surface meets strict Australian standards and makes for a safe and healthy workplace for employees.