US FDA briefs Asia Pacific on Smarter Food Safety

At a recent global briefing, Frank Yiannas, the US Food and Drug Administration’s deputy commissioner for Food Policy and Response, addressed more than 200 attendees from 33 countries on the importance of traceability and transparency in food systems.

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2DBarcode – the next generation of barcoding technology

For more than 45 years, consumers around the world have become familiar with the ubiquitous barcode, named by the BBC as one of the top 50 inventions that changed the modern economy. Applied by brand owners and manufacturers and used extensively along the supply chain, the barcode that most of us are used to seeing is the EAN-13, which appears on tens of millions of products worldwide.
The EAN-13 contains one piece of information only – a Global Trade Item Number or GTIN. A GTIN is the number uniquely assigned to the product by the brand owner from the numbers allocated to them by not-for-profit standards body GS1 Australia.
A GTIN is entered into a retailer’s database as the look-up for the product. The product’s description, price and other data is then linked to that GTIN, so that when it is scanned at point-of-sale, or further up the supply chain, the correct information is provided to the user, decisions can be made and transactions recorded.
This has had a significant impact on the way companies do business across the world. Retailers have streamlined their supply chains, brand owners have pored over scanned data to make product development decisions, while consumers have been offered a range of products, made possible by better supply chain management capabilities due to better information; information made available by the barcode.
So, after 45 years it is time to take the next step. The GS1 DataMatrix is a two-dimensional barcode, that contains much more data than the 13 digits of the linear and one dimensional EAN-13. This allows much more information to be encoded than just a product identifier.
2DBarcodes can encode alpha characters as well as numbers, and over 3,000 digits instead of 13. Batch and serial numbers can be included in the data within the code. Best before or use-by dates can be added. Pack weights and variable dimensions or quantities can be included. This provides much more granular information about the product to support decision making at every point of the supply chain.
Suppliers and retailers can manage stock rotations based on expiration dates. Recalls can be managed by batch instead of pulling a complete product line from the shelves. Recalled or expired product can be blocked from sale. Retailers can apply automatic mark-downs for product approaching expiry to facilitate stock liquidation without the added expense of remarking product on the shelf.
“For suppliers and retailers, 2DBarcodes mean that food products can be recalled by batch or lot number,” said Maria Palazzolo, CEO of GS1 Australia, “The affected batch can be identified more accurately within the supply chain. This means only the affected products need to be removed from warehouses and supermarket shelves. The product recall process currently requires all recalled products to be removed from the supply chain and disposed of.”
The benefits are significant, which is why Woolworths has commenced an initial implementation in its perishable goods area with two suppliers, Hilton Foods and Ingham’s. The lessons gained from this implementation will facilitate a smooth rollout across all suppliers over the next few months.
One of the early lessons, that was flagged from the beginning but is being better understood now, is the requirement for manufacturers to consider capabilities around dynamic coding, instead of pre-printed barcodes. This means they need some form of in-line printing or labelling capability, able to support existing production line speeds and to deliver consistently high-quality, scannable barcodes.
Mark Dingley is chairman of the Australian Packaging and Processing Machinery Association (APPMA), which represents the printing and coding suppliers who are working with manufacturers to deliver codes that are clearly readable by retailers.
“Understanding the transition from 1D barcodes to 2DBarcodes will be very important to manufacturers,” said Dingley. “Especially as this will likely drive changes to the production line with the move to in-line printing of the barcode from pre-print. Understanding that this may require additional infrastructure and validation on the production line to ensure that print quality is maintained from the first printed barcode to the last and that this is maintained day in, day out to achieve a high level of scanning at point of sale will be crucial to long term consistency. Discussions with your coding and label supplier will be able to assist in this transition if required.”
“Early learnings have shown that for suppliers who are transitioning to implement 2DBarcodes, getting in touch with their print partners early on in the process, as early as possible, will greatly assist in the transition process and help avoid any complications that may occur with their product labels in-store and down the track,” said Andrew Steele, director, retail at GS1 Australia.
Manufacturers and suppliers should not assume they can turn this around quickly.
Consideration must be given to the data source, and ensuring data is consistent across the pack to align with inkjet batch and expiration codes. It will take trials and testing to ensure everything is adequately controlled to ensure the quality of codes remains high, long after installation. Maintenance is key. While those suppliers who use the codes for internal purposes, such as stock control, batch control and recall management are more likely to pick up errors as soon as they occur, long before products make it to market.
While still in the implementation phase, the results have been excellent. One result has been that 2DBarcodes were awarded the Innovative Technology of the Year award at the recent Food and Beverage Industry Awards. The judges acknowledged the technology ahead of strong competition for its potential to shape the future in much the same way the original barcode had done all those years ago.
The key takeaway for suppliers is to not think this can be implemented overnight. It may require an upgrade or enhancement to existing systems. Suppliers should start thinking today about how they can make this work within their operations so they can be ready to go when their customers make the request.
“GS1 is working closely with Woolworths and their suppliers to provide tools and assistance in support of their transition from 1D to 2DBarcodes,” said Steele.
“We’ve developed a dedicated webpage and handy step-by-step guide, available on the GS1 website which is great place for suppliers to start.”

Drakes Supermarkets adopts GS1’s Recall platform

Independent grocery retailer Drakes Supermarkets continues its reputation as a trusted place to shop through the adoption of GS1 Australia’s Recall service, a digital platform that efficiently removes unsuitable and unsafe products from store shelves.

For close to 50 years, Drakes has kept its focus on the most important aspect of its business, the customer. To protect customers, Drakes has implemented the use of GS1 Recall, a technology used by major retailers nation-wide to help identify and remove unsafe products from the supply chain.

The strength of GS1 Recall lies in the delivery of faster, more accurate communications between trading partners, suppliers and regulators. Should a product be considered unsafe, unsuitable or incorrectly labelled for sale, GS1 Recall is used to rapidly request removal of those products from the supermarket shelves.

“GS1 Recall is another step towards Drakes’ dedication to the delivery of an outstanding shopping experience for our customers. Pursuing best practice in the execution of product recalls is an important way for us to help keep our customers safe,” said John-Paul Drake, director, Drakes Supermarkets.

GS1 Recall supports the FSANZ Food Industry Recall Protocol and is certified by HACCP Australia.

GS1 Australia works in collaboration with industry, for industry, providing global standards and technology-neutral services to help solve the business challenges of today and for the future

Food & Beverage Award winners announced

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic the Food & Beverage Industry Awards event had to be delivered online, but that didn’t stop a plethora of entries coming in from all corners of Australia – and what an impressive array it was.

Every finalist was worthy of being on the nominee list in their category, with each story on how they got to where they are being insightful, and in some cases surprising.

One common theme among this years’ entries, unsurprisingly, was the determination and ability to change with the times as the world was enveloped in a pandemic. It showed that not only is the industry chock-full of people with great ideas, but also the resilience to get on with the job when trouble strikes.

As one judge put it:
“Overall, every entry was of a high nature and probably spoke to the quality of Australian manufacturers being able to be innovative. Not just with the products they are building, but the way they are presenting them in terms of marketing and branding and going that next step around sustainability as well with packaging. I was really impressed with the way Australian manufacturers are connecting with emerging trends and being able to be agile and develop products quickly, and even before doing so, they are conducting a lot of market and consumer research to validate and justify the path they are going down.

All at Food & Beverage Industry News would also like to give a special thanks to premium sponsor Heat & Control, as well as Food Innovation Australia who helped organise and provide judges for the event. A detailed report of each winner will be in the September issue of Food & Beverage Industry News, which will be available in the second week of the month.

Proudly Sponsored by:

For Heat and Control creativity and ingenuity are not abstract concepts, they are tangible company assets. With over 200 patents and counting, our commitment to take risks and ask “what if” continue to be one of our treasured principles. We understand for companies to be truly innovative and successful, there will always be boundaries to push, and new ideas to explore. In 2020 Heat and Control celebrates 70 years of innovation and is proud to sponsor the Food & Beverage Industry News Innovative Technology Award. Congratulations and best of luck to the finalists.

Export Product of the Year

Winner
Coco Luxe Coconut Water – Coco Luxe Life

Finalists
Choc Love Bites – Slim Secrets
Protein Powder – Steggall Nutrition Pty Ltd
Ready to Drink Milk Tea Range – NineCha Aust PL

Start-Up of the Year

Winner
v2food

Finalists
17 Rocks
Garlicious Grown
Lakanto Australia
Minjums Foods
Savio Healthy Innovations
Seedsations

Innovative Technology Award
Proudly sponsored by Heat & Control

Winner
2D Barcode by GS1 – GS1 Australia

Finalists
LinX tubular Linear Motor – ANCA Motion
PolarDry – Spraying Systems Co.
Special Vacuum Head – SMC Corporation
VentX Stretch Film Slitter – Omni Group

Convenience Product of the Year

Winner
Collagen Beauty Flavours – Nutra Organics

Finalists
Fable Range – Fable Food Co.
Jarrah Honey Drinks Products – Jas Refresh Pty Ltd
Keto Crackers, Garlic Bread – Keto Kitchen Corner
Natural Beef Bone Broth Range – Australian Bone Broth Co.
Upple – Savio Healthy Innovations

Retail Product of the Year

Winner
v2mince – v2food

Finalists
BADASS – Badlands Brewery
Our Family Table Gluten Free Range – Land of Plenty Food
FREE Organic Lager – FREE Brewing Co
Kombucha Yoghurt – Roar & Tonic
Lakanto Monkfruit Sweetener – Lakanto Australia
Simson’s Pantry High Protein Low Carb Wrap – True Foods

Foodservice Product of the Year

Winner
Sweet Lupin Flake – The Lupin Co.

Finalists
Limited Edition Range; Quandong Extract – The Australian Superfood Co.
v2food – v2food

Locally Sourced Award

Winner
Brookie’s Slow Gin – Cape Byron Distillery

Finalists
Apple Flour – Sensory Mill
Cricket Protein Powder Acheta Domesticus – Edible Bug Shop
Limited Edition Range – The Australian Superfood Co.
Macadamia Non-Aerosol Spray Oil – Coconutts Enterprise Pty Ltd

Food & Beverage Executive of the Year

Winner
Cassandra Spies – Twisted Healthy Treats

Finalists
Andrew May – v2food
Kylie Martin – GF Oats Australia
Nick Psahoulias – Beckhoff Automation Pty Ltd
Tara Lordsmith – Murray River Organics

Best of the Best

Winner
v2food – v2food

GS1 and Manbulloo create next level of tracking

Manbulloo is Australia’s largest grower of mangoes, specialising in the world-renowned mango variety, Kensington Pride. The company takes ‘pride’ in delivering fresh, sweet mangoes to customers in Australia and overseas.

The company has been supplying delicious fruit to its retail partner since 2005 and has worked closely with GS1 Australia for the past seven years, proactively helping to drive industry forward with technology and advancements in data sharing.

Manbulloo wanted to improve the process of information flow in their supply chain, particularly the effectiveness and efficiency of communications and business operations between Manbulloo, their ripeners and their customers.

Scott Ledger, Quality Manager at Manbulloo says, “Our supply chain was fragmented and errors occurred during marketing as timely information was difficult to obtain, or we weren’t able to share it efficiently.” Each partner in the supply chain operated their own proprietary information system. It was difficult for information, such as fruit temperature and ripeness levels, to be shared as the data was only directly available to Manbulloo.

Other members of the supply chain had to rely on Manbulloo sending the information by email. Other information was communicated verbally by telephone, reliant on people being available 24/7. Information was often received last minute and under pressure, resulting in errors, impacting heavily on all members in the chain.

Manbulloo’s vision was to have one product identification and traceability system for the whole supply chain. One that each member could access. As well as a carton identifier that anyone in the chain could scan to identify the history of the fruit as the carton moved through the chain.

Marie Piccone, CEO at Manbulloo says, “What we needed was a ‘whole of chain’ information system that could be accessed by each member of the supply chain and information shared timely and accurately.”

Manbulloo already had GS1 barcoding embedded in their operations. Each piece of fruit was identified by a GS1 Databar label. It made sense to expand the use of the GS1 barcodes to provide improved communications and traceability up and down the supply chain. Ledger added, “The good thing was, because we used GS1, our supply chain partners didn’t need to upgrade or change their technologies. GS1 integrates with other systems including our crop management program and blockchain. The collective of information is available to us in real-time and allows for greater data insights. This leads to an increase and improvement in product knowledge, inventory control and product quality, all creating a better consumer experience.”

Each Manbulloo mango is hand-picked and handled with care at every stage of the supply chain. Specially designed fruit trays are used to protect the delicate fruit during transport and handling, until it reaches its final destination, the supermarket shelf.

For Manbulloo to achieve enhanced levels of communications and visibility throughout the chain, the trays also required unique identification. To address this, the mango giant switched their Freshtrack Gateway implementation to print GS1 serialised barcodes on their tray labels. This allowed every tray on every pallet from all seven Manbulloo farms and five pack houses to be tracked up and down the chain.

Manbulloo also utilised Freshtrack FieldOp, an application developed by FreshTrack Systems to complete quality checks on mangoes in the packhouses. FreshTrack’s solution collects the information and generates the GS1 barcodes on the fruit trays and directly uploads to a blockchain system, in real-time and without any loss in performance. Other companies involved in the Manbulloo initiative were Trust Provenance and Muddy Boots Software.

Trust Provenance provided Manbulloo with an integrity system that enabled all data points in the supply chain to be securely stored and accessed via the one platform. This data was secured by a distributed ledger infrastructure (aka blockchain) and made available to supply chain partners with permissions for who-sees-what. Data points included food safety certificates, real-time temperature data, quality assessments and the location of shipments. All tracked using the serialised barcodes on the mango trays. Each data point is added to the blockchain using GS1 EPCIS event data standards.

With the whole-of-chain network in place, Manbulloo can enter a carton number and see throughout the supply chain, from packing shed to retailer, where all related mangoes are from that batch. It also allows for rapid reporting and because it links with each system in the supply chain (such as FreshTrack, Muddy Boots Software, Emerson, etc) it records, stores and makes information available in real-time, providing flow-on benefits for optimising quality control and management.

Ledger says, “Using GS1 standards in conjunction with other technology solutions, we can now track every carton and every batch through the supply chain, from packing shed to retail shelf. Our order rejections at the retailer’s DC have reduced to very low levels. This is a major win for everyone in the supply chain as it saves an enormous amount of time and money.”

Ultimately, the improvements in data management have helped Manbulloo increase the quality and integrity of their mangoes for consumers – today and for the futur

Supporting industry during COVID-19 crisis

As early as March this year, Australian governments recognised mounting pressure on supply chains to meet the surge in demand for personal protective equipment (PPE). As national infection rates accelerated, the NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian said it best when she gave a run down on what was needed to make sure Australia got through the crisis as best it could in terms of PPE gear. “The world is running short on hand sanitiser, hand wash, soap, gloves, cleaning products, protective clothing, masks, eye wear and paper products.” It was an industry call to arms.

The food and beverage industry wasted no time. Entrepreneurs and business leaders across the country rose to the challenge.

These included the likes of former Australian cricketer Shane Warne’s gin distillery situated in Western Australia, through to stalwart Tasmanian whisky makers at Lark Distilling Co. promptly setting about pivoting their production lines to address the shortage of essential PPE products.

In early April 2020, GS1 Australia launched a program to provide Australian companies who were re-tooling to meet the national need for PPE, with supporting services at no charge.
This includes membership, identification numbers for barcodes, assistance in creating and testing new barcodes, and access to national registries to enable their quick transition into the new market. Over 30 companies registered in the first 24 hours.

One of the firms GS1 Australia has been able to assist through the program is Lark Distilling Co., manufacturers of world famous ‘Lark’ branded whisky, who took decisive action in response to the demand for PPE products in Tasmanian hospitals.

“As soon as the COVID-19 crisis hit we made a very fast decision to pivot into sanitiser production, with the express aim of alleviating the shortage for frontline medical and emergency services,” said Dan Knight, head of hospitality at Lark Distilling Co.

“However, once we began production we were overwhelmed with enquiries from people and businesses across the entire state. The world was scrambling to find sanitiser, but being on an island, that is cut off from the mainland, our supply shortage was even more pressing.

“After our first batch of sanitiser, we set the goal of ensuring the continuous supply of World Health Organisation-approved sanitiser to all of Tasmania, for the length of the crisis and beyond. The challenge has been to ensure the supply of raw materials and packaging, and it has taken the collective resources of an entire community to make this happen.
“I am forever grateful to our suppliers and organisations like GS1 for their support, and I am in awe of what we have been able to achieve in such a short time, by working as one in the face of a common threat.”

“We want to ensure that new suppliers to the health industry who are re-tooling to manufacture PPE products get express but comprehensive support for the duration of the COVID-19 crisis in Australia,” said Maria Palazzolo, GS1 Australia’s chief executive officer and executive director.

“Our priority right now is to support the sector that is supporting our community,”

Simplifying and integrating the supply chain journey

Consumers’ daily lives revolve around trust. Every day, when peeling an orange, opening a can of baked beans or dining in a favourite restaurant, consumers put their trust in Australia’s food supply chain.

Behind every food and beverage product on the shelf is a supply chain journey that starts with ingredients. The Australian food manufacturing industry is an intricate maze of ingredient and packaging suppliers, most with different supply chain management solutions.

Today, sourcing ingredients without a traceability and food safety protocol invites counterfeit products onto the food chain and an increased risk of contamination. News of unsafe or spoilt food can impact business owner’s livelihoods and the industry’s broader reputation, along with disruption to consumer’s lives.

“To manage ingredient safety and increase the visibility of food ingredients and raw materials in these complex supply chains, a new initiative, the Supply Chain Improvement project, is being implemented using GS1 standards,” said GS1 Australian account director Andrew Steele. “The project’s objective is strengthening integration between the thousands of upstream supply chains in the Australian food manufacturing industry.”

An industry working group has been set up to drive the project using the GS1 global standards for product identification, data capture and data sharing. GS1’s Global Traceability Standard (GTS) is the foremost traceability framework, allowing businesses to track their products in real-time and have end-to-end visibility of the supply chain.

“The group will work to achieve consensus across the industry to improve food safety, deliver efficiencies and reduce costs,” said Steele.

Representatives from Nestlé, Ingham’s, SPC, Lion Dairy and Drinks, Sanitarium, CHR Hansen, Newly Weds Foods, FPC Food Plastics, Labelmakers, Matthews Australasia and Visy Industries make up the group.

The ability for companies to capture material movements from ‘paddock-to-plate’ provides data integrity and timeliness from receipt to delivery, with traceability back to the source. Through automation, many of the manual processes are eliminated and businesses can be proactive with inventory management and handling systems.

“As a food and beverage business it’s critical for us from a food safety perspective to be able to track ingredients all the way back to the origin,” said SPC’s national logistics manager, Christian Lecompte.

Also critical to business is the capability to support information and production flow within existing systems for integrated supply chains. The project has the capacity to eliminate waste within an organisation’s value stream, reduce non-value-added tasks and ensure cost-effective solutions for customers, leading to a ‘right-first-time’ approach for all deliveries.

“One of the things we found we could do to be more efficient was to look at opportunities to be able to electronically track all the product ingredients throughout the production cycle – how we identify a product coming into the warehouses, how we receipt goods, how we put our goods away, how we manage our inventory and how we deal with our suppliers,” said Lecompte.

The adoption of GS1 standards as the common language for the identification, data capture and data sharing will enable automation of key ingredient sourcing, and traceability between ingredient suppliers and food manufacturers. Using GS1 standards for upstream integration goes well beyond minimum standards and allows businesses to translate their internal processes and approaches into the one common language that all trading partners can use and understand, without having to translate data formats across different supply chain management systems. This is the key as Steele believes interoperability is essential to the future of data sharing.

“Establishing international standards to ensure transparency across the supply chain can help lower existing barriers to the exchange of data between suppliers, trading partners and consumers,” he said.

The Supply Chain Improvement Project has the potential to deliver many benefits to industry, including increased visibility of food ingredients and raw materials, unique identification and traceability to improve food safety, and reduced costs with automated business transactions.

Nestle Australia’s head of digital supply chain, Mandeep Sodhi pointed out the key to the project’s success. “By having consensus across the industry on how to interconnect electronically and exchange critical operational data, we can realise cost-effective solutions across the end-to-end – from manufacturers, to suppliers, to customers – everyone benefits from this improvement in standardisation,” he said.

Looking ahead, the industry working group is encouraging all upstream businesses to adopt the food safety and traceability protocol using GS1 standards.

“With an industry-wide solution in place, your trading partners will have more visibility of your products across the supply chain,” said Steele.

Having a trusted foundation for global food safety

As the challenges of food safety intensify throughout the world, so does the need for global traceability. Consumers put their trust in the food they eat, and the supply chains that deliver those products. Yet, supply chains are becoming more complex, and with that complexity comes risk.

Digital supply chains
Brands are faced with difficulties like managing product recalls and meeting the demands of consumers wanting to know more about the food they buy.

As digitalisation in the supply chain accelerates, alignment between trading partners is essential to achieve transparency.

There is a renewed sense of urgency for collaboration to create an “ecosystem”, where traceability solutions can easily “talk” to each other and share information between trading partners and consumers.

Senior global food industry influencers, including director at Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI) Veronique Discours-Buhot, shared their view on the future of traceability and the need for information sharing, “In order to really demonstrate value, traceability systems must be interoperable, easy to use and a real turnkey solution for collaboration,” said Discours-Buhot.

GS1 traceability – a solid foundation
GS1 has developed a technology-neutral framework that uses common identifiers, such as barcodes, to automatically collect and provide access to information across every step of the food supply chain, delivering visibility of products as they travel from grower to customer.

The information captured by GS1 barcodes, Data Matrix or RFID tags, contains unique global identification numbers.

These form the foundation to enable collaboration between producers, manufacturers, trading partners, consumers and regulators. It also helps link corporate and customer information in a clear and systematic way. In the future they will also enable the automation of laws and regulations.

GS1 Australia provides organisations with the added advantage of national “building blocks” and making traceability implementation possible in full alignment with other stakeholders in their sectors. These building blocks consist of:
• HACCP-certified national recall system
• National product catalogue
• National locations registry
• Consulting and Training network

The GFSI and GS1 serve the same members of the global food supply chain. Both organisations are grounded in a belief in standards and collaboration, working together to shape a better ecosystem of traceability solutions.

GFSI focusses on setting high-level food safety requirements, while GS1 focuses on how organisations can design and implement traceability solutions. Solutions that meet industry best practices and enable end-to-end interoperability and transparency.
Interoperable traceability

Retailers, suppliers, distributors, and consumers are all demanding fast, accurate and complete information that can be seamlessly accessed from anywhere across the supply chain.

Questions from trading partners, consumers and regulatory authorities such as; Where was it grown? Who was involved in the supply chain? Was it produced following food safety practices? require accurate and timely responses. Information to respond to these questions is often spread across different areas and systems in the supply chain. If traceability systems are interoperable, they can easily collaborate and share information, providing greater visibility across the entire supply chain.

Another key factor for interoperable traceability is adaptable solutions.

These solutions should leverage investments based on proven technologies and make use of what is already in place (e.g. logistic labels, barcode scanners) within each company and/or its trading partners.

Big data, artificial intelligence, blockchain and smart everything
Emerging technologies are bringing new opportunities for managing food safety. Yet technology alone will not provide global traceability.

Those developing blockchain solutions for supply chain challenges need to understand that, without common identifiers, the latest technology and devices will not be a cure-all. They run the risk of becoming another isolated system unable to integrate with existing systems.

For traceability to thrive, all stakeholders must come together and cooperate. Open, global standards, such as the GS1 Global Traceability Standard, will enable the use of technologies and automation within food production, processing and delivery processes for end-to-end traceability.

A foundation for interoperable traceability
The GS1 Global Traceability Standard provides a foundation for interoperable traceability systems, making it possible for:
• Different traceability systems to use a common language to talk to each other.
• Organisations to access, combine and interpret data from a variety of sources across the end-to-end supply chain.
• Each trading partner to choose the GS1-enabled traceability solution that best meets its specific needs.

We all win with traceability
When we collaborate, recalls can be faster and more precise, sustainability efforts can be strengthened, and customer trust can be elevated.

All of this is possible with GS1 interoperable and transparent traceability.

Huge bounty from local and overseas vendors at Fine Foods Australia

Fine Food Australia opened to large crowds at Sydney’s International Convention Centre (ICC) with a massive range of products and services on display. This included a huge contingent from China, as well as other Southeast Asian nations such as Taiwan and Thailand, while the European contingent included representatives from Turkey, Italy, Spain and Germany.

As well as a bevy of taste sensations in both food and beverage, there were those exhibitors who also help with the packaging, safety and traceability of perishable goods. One such stand was occupied by barcode specialist GS1, who were having a busy day.

“It’s been really good,” said account director Andrew Steele. “For us it has been about getting our message out especially to the smaller companies that are starting up and they don’t know where to start, where to go or what to do. The most common issue people have is ‘how do I get a barcode?’, and ‘why do I need one?’

“Generally what we find at these sorts of events is that people come up with new, innovative type products but they don’t know what they need to do around barcoding and the like to get their products with some of the major retailers or online places like Amazon.’

And some of the other issues they are finding visitors are interested in?

“Traceability is becoming really big in food, as well as food safety and provenance. Consumers are certainly asking today more about what has gone into a product and they want to know the story behind it.”

A new player in the beverage space, AquaRush was busy all day. For the company, it wasn’t just about getting their product out there but also about finding local distributors as well as drumming up interest from overseas, according to national sales manager Marko Powell.

“We’ve had some really interesting bites from overseas,” said Powell. “We are looking for distributors for every state with our new range. We have nine new products out and today has been pretty full on that is for sure. All of these products we are introducing are new to the market so we are not copying anybody. Another stream we are looking at is selling some of our products as mixers for the liquor industry.”

Then there is Melbourne-based Cookers Bulk Oil who has had 100s of people go through its stand. The company has been on the go and made some good connections according to marketing manager Marianna Costa.

“The show has been fantastic,” said Costa. “We have been incredibility busy and meeting lots of people. We’ve had some good leads and numbers through. For us it’s about education and it’s about brand awareness. We want people to see and hear about our sustainability message at Cookers.’

Taking up two floors at the ICC, and with 900 exhibitors, the event has three more days to run.

 

 

GS1 NEXUS 2019 conference to shape future of supply chains

GS1 Nexus 2019, the conference hosted by GS1 Australia, will feature speakers from more than 45 companies and organisations including Coles, Woolworths, Amazon, Google, the Small Business Ombudsman and Business Victoria, the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association (AHHA) and the Australasian Railway Association (ARA) who will share the latest insights and expertise to address today’s industry challenges and help shape the future supply chain networks in the digital age.

GS1 Nexus 2019 will take place on 14 May 2019 at the Melbourne Convention & Exhibition Centre and on 17 May 2019 at the Sydney International Convention Centre. The conference program and speaker line-up is available at www.gs1nexus.org.au/program

Now in its 8th year, around 700 supply chain professionals, business owners, health providers, industry leaders, solution providers and representatives from government and associations will attend GS1 Nexus to learn what predictions are being made for industry and to unlock new opportunities for their business with GS1 standards.

“This year’s program showcases the latest trends and foundational capabilities businesses need to survive with a focus on traceability systems and optimising data in today’s digital world,” said Marcel Sieira, head of customer engagement and business development at GS1 Australia.

“New this year, the conference offers delegates these morning plenary sessions: Technology Disruption in the Supply Chain, Standards in Freight and Logistics, Traceability and Safety Trends and Digital Commerce. In the afternoon delegates can attend four separate streams showcasing key topics in Food & Beverage, Online Retail, Healthcare and Rail,” he said.

Maria Palazzolo, executive director and CEO of GS1 Australia said, “‘As we celebrate our 40th year of supporting Australian industry, we’re excited to bring together businesses and industries at GS1 Nexus 2019 as we explore new concepts and technologies, both local and global, to reduce supply chain complexity, keep costs down and enable clear trading partner exchanges with GS1 standards.”

GS1 Nexus also offers opportunities for delegates to network and learn in the “Marketplace” exhibit area showcasing the latest products and solutions for those looking to support the implementation of GS1 standards in their business, and to discover more about the suite of GS1 Australia services.

GS1 Nexus 2019 – Supply Chain Conference

GS1 Nexus 2019 promises to be an interactive experience for retailers, suppliers and manufacturers. Learn what industry leaders from Coles, Woolworths, Amazon, Google and many more are predicting and how future trends will affect you and your business. Sessions include Data & Digital in the Food & Beverage Supply Chain, Keeping the Consumer in Focus, Traceability & Visibility, the New World of Supply Chain (Automation/Innovation) and Standards in Freight & Logistics.
Melbourne – May 14, Melbourne Convention & Exhibition Centre
Sydney – May 17, International Convention Centre

How to conduct better product recalls – Industry advice for the food and grocery sector

Want expert advice on how to ensure a product recall is executed accurately and efficiently?

GS1 has put together a video on how to conduct better product recalls, providing industry advice for the food and grocery sector. Communications to trading partners and regulators assist organisations to compile and communicate product recall noticed to your customers as quickly as possible. Get up to speed on the basics of how to conduct a product recall, land earn where to go for help in the event of a product recall emergency.

How to simplify the supply chain journey

Consumers’ daily lives revolve around trust. Every day, when peeling an orange, opening a can of baked beans or dining in a favourite restaurant, consumers put their trust in Australia’s food supply chain.

Behind every food and beverage product on the shelf is a supply chain journey that starts with ingredients. The Australian food manufacturing industry is an intricate maze of ingredient and packaging suppliers that have different supply chain management solutions.

Sourcing ingredients without a traceability and food safety protocol today invites counterfeit products onto the food chain and increases the risk of contamination. News of unsafe or spoilt food can impact business owners’ livelihoods and the industry’s broader reputation, and causes significant disruption to consumers’ lives.

“To manage ingredient safety and increase the visibility of food ingredients and raw materials in these complex supply chains, a new initiative, the Supply Chain Improvement Project, is being implemented using GS1 standards,” said Steele. “The project’s objective is strengthening integration between the thousands of upstream supply chains in the Australian food manufacturing industry.”

An industry working group has been set up to drive the project using the GS1 global standards for product identification, data capture and data sharing. GS1’s Global Traceability Standard (GTS) is the foremost traceability framework, allowing businesses to track their products in real-time and have end-to-end visibility of the supply chain.
“The group will work to achieve consensus across the industry to improve food safety, deliver efficiencies and reduce costs,” said Steele.

Representatives from Nestlé, Ingham’s, SPC, Lion Dairy and Drinks, Sanitarium, CHR Hansen, Newly Weds Foods, FPC Food Plastics, Labelmakers, Matthews Australasia and Visy Industries make up the group.

The ability for companies to capture material movements from “paddock to plate” provides data integrity and timeliness from receipt to delivery, with traceability back to the source. Through automation, many of the manual processes are eliminated and businesses can be proactive with inventory management and handling systems.
“As a food and beverage business it’s critical for us from a food safety perspective to be able to track ingredients all the way back to the origin,” said SPC’s national logistics manager, Christian Lecompte.

Also critical to business is the capability to support information and production flow within existing systems for integrated supply chains. The project has the capacity to eliminate waste within an organisation’s value stream, reduce non-value-added tasks and ensure cost-effective solutions for customers, leading to a “right-first-time” approach for all deliveries.

“One of the things we found we could do to be more efficient was to look at opportunities to be able to electronically track all the product ingredients throughout the production cycle – how we identify a product coming into the warehouses, how we receipt goods, how we put our goods away, how we manage our inventory and how we deal with our suppliers,” said Lecompte.

The adoption of GS1 standards as the common language for identification, data capture and data sharing will enable automation of key ingredient sourcing and traceability between ingredient suppliers and food manufacturers.

Using GS1 standards for upstream integration goes well beyond minimum standards. It allows businesses to translate their internal processes and approaches into the one common language that all trading partners can use and understand, without having to translate data formats across different supply chain management systems.

This is the key, as Steele believes interoperability is essential to the future of data sharing. “Establishing international standards to ensure transparency across the supply chain can help lower existing barriers to the exchange of data between suppliers, trading partners and consumers,” he said.

The Supply Chain Improvement Project has the potential to deliver many benefits to industry, including increased visibility of food ingredients and raw materials, unique identification and traceability to improve food safety, and reduced costs with automated business transactions.

Nestlé Australia’s eBusiness manager, Mandeep Sodhi pointed out the key to the project’s success.

“By having consensus across the industry on how to interconnect electronically and exchange critical operational data, we can realise cost-effective solutions across the end-to-end – from manufacturers, to suppliers, to customers. Everyone benefits from this improvement in standardisation,” he said.

Looking ahead, the industry working group is encouraging all upstream businesses to adopt the food safety and traceability protocol using GS1 standards.

“With an industry-wide solution in place, your trading partners will have more visibility of your products across the supply chain,” said Steele.

Eliminating waste within the value stream

Behind every food and beverage product on the shelf is a supply chain journey that starts with ingredients. The Australian food manufacturing industry is an intricate maze of ingredient and packaging suppliers, most with different supply chain management solutions.

To manage ingredient safety and increase the visibility of food ingredients and raw materials in these complex supply chains, a new project, titled the Supply Chain Improvement Project, is being implemented with the objective of strengthening integration between upstream supply chains in the Australian food manufacturing industry.

An industry working group has been set up to drive the project using GS1 standards. The group will work to achieve consensus across the industry to improve food safety, deliver efficiencies and reduce costs. Representatives from Nestlé, Ingham’s, SPC, Lion Dairy and Drinks, Sanitarium, CHR Hansen, Newly Weds Foods, FPC Food Plastics, Labelmakers and Visy Industries are some who currently make up the group.

The ability to capture material movements from “paddock to plate” provides data integrity and timeliness from receipt to delivery, with traceability back to the source. Through automation, many of the manual processes are eliminated and companies can be proactive with inventory management and handling systems.

The capability to support information and production flow within existing systems for integrated supply chains is critical to businesses. The project has the capacity to eliminate waste within an organisation’s value stream, reduce non-value-added tasks and ensure cost-effective solutions for customers, leading to a “right-first-time” approach for all deliveries.

Sourcing ingredients without a traceability and food safety protocol today invites counterfeit products onto the food chain and increases risk of contamination.
The adoption of GS1 standards as the common language for the identification, data capture and data sharing will enable automation of key ingredient sourcing, and traceability between ingredient suppliers and food manufacturers.

Using GS1 standards for upstream integration allows companies to translate their internal processes and approaches into a common language that all trading partners can use and understand without having to translate data formats across different supply chain management systems.

The Supply Chain Improvement Project has the potential to confer many benefits to industry, including increased visibility of food ingredients and raw materials, unique identification and traceability to improve food safety, and reduced costs with automated business transactions.

GS1 adds UBL to its EDI standard syntax portfolio

 GS1 recently approved the new, business-driven GS1 EDI strategy that integrates Universal Business Language (UBL) in its EDI standard syntax portfolio that already includes EDIFACT/EANCOM, GS1 XML and GS1 UN/CEFACT XML syntaxes.

As part of the new EDI strategy, GS1 will undertake a major harmonisation initiative to provide a single content description for transactional data. This innovative approach will apply to all existing EDI syntaxes, new API syntaxes and future technologies used to exchange transactional data.

UBL will provide an entry point into eCommerce for small and medium size businesses and could also be used for cross sector transactions including business-to-government eInvoicing or business-to-business transactions between two trading partners from different private sectors.

The Government progressing eInvoicing joint media release issued by The Hon Kelly O’Dwyer MP, Minister for Revenue and Financial Services with The Hon Michael Keenan MP, Minister for Human Services and Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for Digital Transformation, and The Hon Craig Laundy MP, Minister for Small and Family Business, Workplace and Deregulation released on the 31 March 2018, announced that the Turnbull Government will commence work to progressively adopt eInvoicing across all levels of government to improve processes and help businesses.

 

GS1 Australia’s executive director and CEO, Maria Palazzolo said, “We welcome the decision by the Australian government to adopt eInvoicing for the benefit of the business community and our members. The addition of UBL to the GS1 EDI standard syntax portfolio provides further support for the government’s eInvoicing program which will simplify doing business with government and industry.”

 

The government’s eInvoicing program is based on the framework developed by the Digital Business Council and the recently established Trans-Tasman working group made up of representatives from the Australian Taxation Office, Department of Industry, Innovation and Science, Department of Jobs and Small Business, Digital Transformation Agency, Treasury, and the New Zealand Government.

 

The Trans-Tasman working group, recently announced by The Hon Kelly O’Dwyer MP, was established to support industry to standardise eInvoicing processes in Australia and New Zealand, and align with opportunities presented from the digital transformation of our economy.

 

The addition of UBL will not impact existing B2B EDI standards. EDI user communities that have used EDI for years can continue to use the UN/EDIFACT syntax that GS1 will continue to fully support.

 

“The new EDI strategy represents a major shift to the development of business-driven standards away from technology driven standards. This new direction will improve operational processes for users of current technologies and lay the foundation for adopting seamless modern technologies such as UBL and APIs,” added Palazzolo.

Australian start-up, TBSx3, joins GS1 Alliance Partner Program

TBSx3, an Australian start-up committed to restoring trust to international trade using blockchain technology combined with the latest anti-counterfeit technologies have announced that they have joined GS1 Australia’s Alliance Partner Program.

GS1 is a not-for-profit organisation providing standards, services and emerging technologies to help solve omni channel challenges and improve inventory accuracy, visibility and traceability of supply chains across physical and digital channels in the retail sector.

The team at TBSx3 have developed a blockchain solution that protects brands and their supply chains and empowers their consumers with product origin information. The TBSx3 system provides three essential supply chain capabilities and digitises all related documents such as Certificates of Origin: provenance, traceability through the custodian chain and authentication.

Pieter Vandevelde, chief revenue officer at TBSx3 said, “Our entry into the GS1 Australia Alliance Partner Program as an Associate Alliance Partner signifies our commitment to enable brands to protect their supply chains through end-to-end visibility using GS1 standards in both sea freight and air freight.”

“The TBSx3 technology also helps brand owners and retailers reassure their consumers that their products are genuine and safe. We use any packaging tracking technology such as QR, intaglio labels or NFC to connect brands with their consumers.”

TBSx3’s technology is supported by a global blockchain consortium of freight forwarders, shippers, sea and airport operators. The platform is next-gen SCM technology and is designed from the ground-up to run on blockchain technology.

GS1 Australia’s Manager – Business Development and Partnerships, Sean Sloan said, “The entry of TBSx3 into the Alliance Partner Program is a great asset to the Alliance Partner community and a significant investment in leveraging GS1 standards to uniquely identify items and exchange data across organisations using a common language.

“We look forward to working in partnership with TBSx3 in the Australian marketplace to combat the trade of counterfeit goods including food, wine, dairy, meat and pharmaceuticals using GS1 standards.”