Domino Cloud and Ax-Series is helping manufacturers build the Factory of the Future

The fourth industrial revolution is upon us. Industry 4.0 is set to revolutionise manufacturing and production through the utilisation of cyber connected systems, which monitor factory processes to maximise efficiency and reduce downtime.

Industry 4.0 is a globally accepted reality that is affecting nearly every industry worldwide, and is transforming how businesses operate. It introduces a ‘smart factory’, where cyber-physical systems monitor production processes and are capable of making decentralized decisions – for example, monitoring consumable levels in a printer and alerting users that a consumable changeover is required.

In an Industry 4.0 factory, every machine and computing device is integrated and connected to the internet, enabling them to send and receive data – this process is what’s commonly known as the Internet of Things. The interconnectivity of these smart devices is empowering a step change in productivity, efficiency and customer-centric innovation for manufacturers.

This article goes beyond the buzzwords surrounding Industry 4.0 and highlights how it is empowering Australian manufacturers in achieving maximum efficiency in coding and marking processes.

What is Domino Cloud?

The release of Domino’s i-Techx platform and the Domino Cloud service tool are shaping Industry 4.0 in the areas of coding and marking. Both built into Domino’s latest continuous inkjet technology the Ax-Series, is equipped with features to be ready for the factory of the future.

Designed from the ground up to be industry 4.0 ready, the Domino Ax-Series easily integrates into existing production lines and supports a variety of standard factory automation communication protocols such as PACK-ML and OPC-UA.

Additionally, an array of integrated sensors automate system monitoring, allowing for proactive and predictive diagnostics and remote service support through the Internet of Things (IoT) and connection to the Domino Cloud.

The Domino Cloud provides powerful remote diagnostics, remote monitoring and customer reporting capabilities. For example, Domino’s i-Techx platform collects a vast array of data on printer operation – from running performance to ink and makeup levels, to wear and tear on components. This data is can be accessed through the Domino Cloud dashboard where it can be viewed by the customer at any time, regardless of the location. This enables the customer to be alerted to any issues and forecast ink and consumable orders. Additionally, this data incorporates Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) calculations and printer usage changes to provide insights for line improvement and lead manufacturing initiatives.

How does Domino Cloud help manufacturers?

Domino’s i-Techx platform and the Domino Cloud service tool provides manufacturers with error-free coding and system integration, as well as remote access and monitoring. This results in a smart and interconnected network of machines and processes that centralises and simplifies coding processes.

The consumption of ink and make-up can be monitored in real-time, utalising the Domino Cloud dashboard. Additionally, complications can be diagnosed from a distance by the helpdesk team and either fixed remotely or through an insignia service technician who can find the problem on-site.

Moreover, through automation, streams of information for OEE calculations and cost structures can be closely monitored to maximise efficiency, resulting in reduced downtime and increased production at the lowest possible cost.

Decentralised systems can increase profitability for manufacturers by streamlining and speeding up decisions, resulting in increased revenue, market share and profits for many businesses.

For coding and marking processes, Industry 4.0 means that inaccurate codes and unplanned downtime caused by equipment will no longer be a problem faced by manufacturers. Coding and marking machines will become part of a single intelligent factory operation, capable of monitoring performance and assisting team members with making informed decisions.

Domino Cloud is already shaping factories of the future and empowering a step change in productivity and efficiency for manufacturers. “We highly recommend Domino Cloud as a user friendly remote tool that gives us useful management information insight into all our connected production lines” affirms Dorin Cimpu, Manager Strategic Projects, Continental Tyres.

If you would like more information on Industry 4.0, the Domino Cloud, or to speak with the team about upgrading your current coding technology, please contact insignia on 1300 467 446 or visit https://www.insignia.com.au/domino-services/cloud

Dr Nico Adams to lead Swinburne’s Factory of the Future

Dr Nico Adams, formerly of the CSIRO, has been appointed as the new Director of Swinburne’s advanced manufacturing facility, the Factory of the Future.

Dr Adams has a background in materials and manufacturing informatics, and holds degrees from Oxford University and the University of York.

Prior to his appointment at Swinburne, Dr Adams was a senior research scientist and product manager at Data61, Australia’s leading data innovation group formed by the CSIRO.

Dr Adams says he was attracted to the role of Director of the Factory of the Future because of Swinburne’s commitment to research led innovation.

“Swinburne understands that to be successful in the digital economy does not just require technical, design and business model innovation, but also the development of leadership skills,” he says.

“Being part of a team working to achieve this is what makes the role of director so exciting.”

During his time at Data61, Dr Adams developed research to assist small-to-medium sized companies in taking advantage of the digital economy and leveraging opportunities afforded by Industry 4.0.

Dr Adams’ research has been reported in publications such as the Guardian, and he has been an in-demand speaker on industry 4.0 related topics.

Following on from his work with CSIRO and Data61, Dr Adams assumed the role of Program Lead for Digital Transformation and Industry 4.0 at the Innovative Manufacturing Cooperative Research Centre (IMCRC).

At IMCRC, Dr Adams co-developed an innovation diagnostic and an Industry 4.0 business, product and strategy framework tailored for small-to-medium sized businesses.

This framework is about to be deployed through several organisations in the manufacturing industry, he says.

“My previous experience has given me a deep insight into how manufacturing companies in Australia today operate,” explains Adams.

“This insight has suggested practical ways of working with companies to formulate and implement new business outcomes enabled by digital technology.”

The Swinburne Factory of the Future is the first University-based Industry 4.0 Enterprise in Australia.

Swinburne Deputy Vice Chancellor, Professor Aleksandar Subic, says Dr Adams’ expertise in digital innovation and Industy 4.0 makes him the perfect fit for the role of Director of Factory of the Future.

Professor Subic says he is confident that the industry knowledge and experience that Dr Adams brings with him will strengthen Swinburne’s capability and industry partnerships.

“The Swinburne Factory of the Future is the first Industry 4.0 University-based enterprise in Australia, involving a cluster of industries and enterprises to develop new capabilities and workforce for the digital economy,” explains Professor Subic.

“In his new role as Director of Swinburne Factory of the Future, Nico is well positioned to help our team further deepen our strategic industry partnerships.

The Factory of the Future supports the university’s strategy across all domains, including research with impact, future-ready learners, and innovative enterprise.

The facility supports students across the entire life cycle of training, education and research.

“Nico will play a key role within our team in developing the Factory of the Future as an innovative Industry 4.0 enterprise,” says Professor Subic.

Professor Subic said the development of the Factory of the Future into a world-class facility had been further helped with last year’s $135 million software grant from industrial giant, Siemens.

Helping build the factory of the future

Industry 4.0 is revolutionising manufacturing through the utilisation of cyber connected systems, which monitor factory processes to maximise efficiency and reduce downtime. Insignia’s Domino Cloud and Ax-Series are part of this global change.

Industry 4.0 is a global reality that is affecting nearly every industry worldwide, and is transforming how businesses operate. It introduces a ‘smart factory’, where cyber-physical systems monitor production processes and are capable of making decentralised decisions – for example, monitoring consumable levels in a printer and alerting users that a consumable changeover is required.

In an Industry 4.0 ready factory, every machine and computing device is integrated and connected to the internet, enabling them to send and receive data – this process is what’s commonly known as the Internet of Things (IoT). The interconnectivity of these smart devices is empowering a step change in productivity, efficiency and customer-centric innovation for manufacturers.

Domino Cloud

The release of Domino’s i-Techx platform and the Domino Cloud service tool are shaping Industry 4.0 in the areas of coding and marking. Both are built into Domino’s latest continuous inkjet technology, the Ax-Series. Designed from the ground up to be industry 4.0 ready, the series easily integrates into existing production lines and supports a variety of standard factory automation communication protocols such as PACK-ML and OPC-UA.

Additionally, an array of integrated sensors automate system monitoring, allowing for proactive and predictive diagnostics and remote service support through the IoT and connection to the Domino Cloud.

The Domino Cloud provides powerful remote diagnostics, remote monitoring and customer reporting capabilities. For example, Domino’s i-Techx platform collects a vast array of data on printer operation – from running performance to ink and makeup levels, to wear and tear on components. This data is can be accessed through the Domino Cloud dashboard where it can be viewed by the customer at any time, regardless of the location. This enables the customer to be alerted to any issues and forecast ink and consumable orders.  Additionally, this data incorporates Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) calculations and printer usage changes to provide insights for line improvement and lead manufacturing initiatives.

How does Domino Cloud help manufacturers?

Domino’s i-Techx platform and the Domino Cloud service tool provides manufacturers with error-free coding and system integration, as well as remote access and monitoring. This results in a smart and interconnected network of machines and processes that centralises and simplifies coding processes.

The consumption of ink and make-up can be monitored in real-time, utilising the Domino Cloud dashboard. Additionally, complications can be diagnosed from a distance by the helpdesk team and either fixed remotely or through an Insignia service technician who can find the problem on-site.

Moreover, through automation, streams of information for OEE calculations and cost structures can be closely monitored to maximise efficiency, resulting in reduced downtime and increased production at the lowest possible cost.

Decentralised systems can increase profitability for manufacturers by streamlining and speeding up decisions, resulting in increased revenue, market share and profits for many businesses.

For coding and marking processes, Industry 4.0 means that inaccurate codes and unplanned downtime caused by equipment will no longer be a problem faced by manufacturers. Coding and marking machines will become part of a single intelligent factory operation, capable of monitoring performance and assisting team members with making informed decisions.

Domino Cloud is already shaping factories of the future and empowering a step change in productivity and efficiency for manufacturers.

“We highly recommend Domino Cloud as a user friendly remote tool that gives us useful management information insight into all our connected production lines,” affirmed Dorin Cimpu, manager strategic projects, Continental Tyres.

 

The food factory of the future will be smart, connected and collaborative

Smart factories with efficient and fully connected supply chains are critical to manufacturing innovation.

Industry 4.0 – the fourth industrial revolution – has opened new market possibilities and enabled manufacturers to be more responsive to customer driven trends.

Manufacturing is undergoing a digital transformation.

Significant advances in technology, including big data and analytics, the Internet of Things (IoT), robotics and additive manufacturing, are changing manufacturing operations globally.

“It’s all about collecting and analyzing data to improve efficiency,” says Chris Probst, Omron’s Automation Technology Product Manager.

“The amount of data doesn’t matter – it’s what you do with the data that counts,” he says.

This was one of the key messages from Omron’s Food & Packaging Seminar “Smart Factory Solutions with IoT Technology” held in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane last week.

At the seminars Omron, a global leader in automation, unveiled its latest smart factory solutions encompassing Internet of Things (IoT) technology.

This included the latest applications in robotics, machine vision, safety, big data, traceability, PackML and IO link.

Omron’s team of experts showed how the new technologies can increase productivity and improve profitability in the Food & Packaging sectors.

Mr Probst said many Australian companies are now talking about the Internet of Things (IoT) technical revolution, but not many are prepared for it.

“Companies that embrace new technologies will be better positioned to adapt to changing marketing conditions and customer needs,” Mr Probst said.

They can also boost productivity by up to 30 percent.

“This is the next generation of manufacturing where people and machines work together,” said Mr Probst.

Mr Probst has no doubt collecting data – and using it to measure performance – holds the key to the future for Australian manufacturers.

Hal Varian, professor of information sciences, business, and economics at the University of California at Berkeley and Google’s Chief Economist agrees.

“The ability to take data – to be able to understand it, to process it, to extract value from it, to visualise it, to communicate it – that’s going to be a hugely important skill in the next decade,” he says.

Mr Wei-Jian Ong, product manager for Omron’s Sysmac controllers based in Singapore, said data collection and analysis can help manufacturers streamline their operations.

“The collection of data is now vital for industry,” Mr Ong told guests at the Sydney seminar.

“The Internet of Things (IoT) is basically a network of devices with network connectivity for the collection and exchange of data.

“With IoT you can Monitor, Analyse and Act – you can coordinate and monitor your production line. All machines work together to perform at optimum level.”

An estimated 13.5 billion devices will be connected by 2020 worldwide.

Programs such as PackML, or Packaging Machine Language, are now being widely adopted by industry globally, Mr Ong said.

PackML is a universal programming standard defined by the Organization for Machine Automation and Control (OMAC) and by the International Society of Automation’s Technical Report 88 which defines a common approach, or machine language, for automated machines.

The factory of the future will be smart_Omron smart factory2

The primary goals are to encourage a common “look and feel” across a plant floor and to enable and encourage industry innovation.

Omron PLCs can work seamlessly with databases such as SQL, which is the standard language allowing manufacturers to communicate with a database. The SQL database can collect huge amounts of data (Big Data), that can be used to measure the performance of each machine and increase yield.

With Omron’s NJ SQL version controllers you can send the OEE (Overall Equipment Efficiency) data from machine to database and then use that data with MES and ERP systems.

“Smart factories need to be more efficient and fully connected to their supply chains,” says Mr Probst.

“Omron offers the industry’s first complete and fully integrated robotic automation solution.

“All of the components are designed to work together.

“Our solutions are developed with Omron’s unified concept – to develop connected, smart, collaborative factories.”

And this is how the concept helps to boost productivity:

  • The Connected Factory – seamlessly integrating machine automation and corporate IT to generate, collect and exchange relevant data
  • The Smart Factory – intelligent data analysis and evaluation to predict maintenance issues and implement improvements to reduce resources, energy and waste
  • The Collaborative Factory – enhancing the interaction between humans and machines.

Omron’s automation solution oversees the entire packaging line, with horizontal and vertical integration, ensuring line coordination and monitoring.

To improve efficiency and improve productivity more factories now turning to robotics – using fixed (Articulated, SCARA and Parallel robots) and mobile robots (AIVs – Autonomous Intelligent Vehicles).

Omron AIV mobile robots use laser scanners and other advanced technologies that allow them to determine their own path, avoid obstacles and be re-tasked quickly.

They are now being used in a wide variety of applications across warehouses, distribution centres, manufacturing, automotive, food & beverage, hospitality, logistics, health & medical and other challenging environments.

“AIVs not only save on labour costs, they can increase operational efficiency,” says Mr Probst.

“Mobile robots are easy to deploy, with no facility modifications required.

“They work safely around people and can operate 24/7.”

Mr Probst said Smart Factories were also helping to significantly improve workplace safety.

And with improved safety employers can minimise worker injuries, machinery downtime and loss of production.

They can also save on worker’s compensation payouts, compliance fines, court costs and legal and insurance fees.

“The Smart Factory of the future will improve workplace safety, improve yield and traceability, drive down production costs and eliminate errors, says Mr Probst.

“This will enable a ‘flexible’ manufacturing revolution.”

The factory of the future will be smart_Omron-smart factory mobile-robot

Communication solution for IIoT era

The emergence of Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) has seen an emphasis placed on implementing innovative architecture and software that redefines asset management. This can then be used to capitalise on operational, business and transactional data for improved enterprise, operations and supply chain performance.

With this in mind, NHP brings to market the ICX35-HWC Industrial Cellular Gateway from ProSoft Technology providing the ideal communication solution for system integrators and OEMs who monitor devices that are in hard to reach spots.

With the gateway, they can monitor and troubleshoot their devices in real-time from anywhere in the world over 4G LTE cellular connections, with fallback to 3G.

To allow enhanced communication, a built-in EtherNet/IP controller supports SMS messaging to the gateway, and read diagnostic data like signal strength, data usage, and more, allowing the user to avoid time-consuming and costly site visits.

The Industrial Cellular Gateway can also be monitored through ProSoft Connect – a secure, cloud-native platform designed specifically for the IIoT. With secure VPN connections via internet and cellular links, the device offers remote site access to corporate networks (VPN Client Mode).

In the ever connecting world, NHP’s Industrial Cellular Gateway helps ensure longevity for your application in the IIoT era using cutting edge technology.

 

Food makers look to the future

Food and beverage makers who gathered in Sydney last week for a key industry seminar heard that, as we move further into the new century, new technologies and Industry 4.0 will become increasingly crucial to the success of their businesses.

Food Factories of the Future was held before a full room at the Novotel Darling Harbour in Sydney last Wednesday morning. The event complimented foodpro which was taking place at the same time at the nearby ICC Exhibition Centre.

The two keynote speakers on hand for the seminar were Peter K. Wienzek, Business Development Manager Systems, ifm efector and John Leadbetter Managing Director, VEGA Australia.

Presenting first, Wienzek pointed out that food makers in 2017 have access to data that simply was not available in the past. Today, he said, everything is online and globally accessible. While this represents a challenge for the industry, it also offers huge opportunities.

He said that, provided it is used correctly, data can help the food factories of the future cut costs while maintaining quality. It can deliver benefits in terms of energy savings, production efficiency, process optimization, condition based maintenance, and more.

Peter K Wienzek’s presentation can be viewed here.

Leadbetter devoted his presentation to the important topic of level control. He said that, whether they are dealing with beer, grain, sugar or milk, food manufacturers require level control technology to monitor their tanks, silos, and vessels. Depending on the application, they can choose between Level Transmitters, Level Switches and Pressure Transmitters to perform this task.

Leadbetter outlined latest developments in this area, including radar level transmitters, pressure transmitters and the use of Bluetooth communications. He said that these new technologies, coupled with a continued emphasis on hygiene, will help the factories of the future run efficiently and profitably.

John Leadbetter’s presentation can be viewed here.

Following the presentations, the speakers took part in a Q&A session. A sample of audience questions included: how big a challenge do Industry 4.0 changes represent for individual businesses; who within management structures needs to take ownership of these challenges; and the ins-and-outs of level control and compliance for food makers.

Food Factories of the Future was organised by Prime Creative Media, publisher of Food & Beverage Industry News. We would like to thank our two speakers, as well as all those present.

(Left to right) John Leadbetter, Peter K. Wienzek, and Matthew McDonald, Editor Food & Beverage Industry News.
(Left to right) John Leadbetter Managing Director, VEGA Australia; Peter K. Wienzek, Business Development Manager Systems, ifm efector; and Matthew McDonald, Editor Food & Beverage Industry News.

 

AUSPACK opens the door to Industry 4.0

Industry 4.0 is changing the game – fast – for manufacturers and the entire supply chain. Connecting IT and OT systems across all operations in a business, it’s enabling data accumulation at an unprecedented scale.

At AUSPACK 2017 the industry can learn about how to make this data unlock value on the production line and beyond.

Manufacturers have more data at their disposal than they realise – intelligent assets like sensors, devices, machinery and other production assets can potentially deliver huge cost savings if the data they store is accessed and exploited intelligently.

According to Rockwell Automation (Stand 73), by the year 2020, more than 50 billion devices are expected to be connected to the internet. These devices are getting smarter and consequently, will help make manufacturing smarter. Now more than ever, manufacturers can readily take advantage of this growing intelligence through modern technology, such as cloud, mobile and converged plantwide EtherNet/IP.

As plants and production processes modernise current and legacy systems, and plant networks converge with enterprise business systems, manufacturers are gaining access to a tremendous amount of data. However, most need help to maximise the benefits of their data and transform it into actionable information.

And there’s the reason to visit AUSPACK 2017, where a host of exhibitors will provide access to the latest thinking and technology on Industry 4.0, from information and automation solutions, to robotics and integrated coding and vision systems. Exhibitors include Foodmach, Fibre King, Rockwell Automation, tna, Sick, SMC, C21 Systems, Robot Technologies Systems Australia and more.

AUSPACK 2017 will run from 7 – 10 March 2017 at Sydney Showground, Sydney Olympic Park.

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