DuPont drives solutions for plant-based food and beverages

With the launch of a new brand designed for co-creation of plant-based beverages, dairy alternatives, meat, fish and seafood, DuPont is looking to enable the transformation of global eating habits.

Danisco Planit marks the latest evolution in DuPont’s plant-based ingredient portfolio – a  range of ingredients and application expertise for food and beverages made with a ‘planet forward,’ sustainable approach.

With the new Danisco Planit range, DuPont Nutrition & Biosciences (DuPont) offers food and beverage manufacturers a selection of ingredients for plant-based product development in the industry, supported by application knowledge and insights to design products for the future.

Plant-in-it is key
In plant-based products, as in all food categories, taste and texture are imperative. However, in plant-based there are a variety of protein sources, and when combined with consumer requirements for health and nutrition, designing and formulating new formats that are top-performing in all sensory dimensions is a challenge. A great tasting product isn’t just about flavor, but the interactivity among sight, smell, touch and sound. Sensory expertise is at the center of new product development for plant-based food and beverages.

Danisco Planit has been launched globally and covers services, expertise, and an ingredient portfolio for plant-based food and beverages: plant proteins, hydrocolloids, cultures, probiotics, fibers, food protection, antioxidants, natural extracts, emulsifiers, and enzymes, as well as tailor-made systems.

Plant-based steak created using 3D printing technology

Redefine Meat has unveiled the world’s first Alt-Steak plant-based products, with market testing at select high-end restaurants to start later this year. Created using Redefine Meat’s patent-pending 3D meat printing technology, the company’s Alt-Steak products have the texture, flavour and appearance of beef steak and can be produced in the volume and cost to enable large-scale market launch.

Working with leading butchers, chefs, food technologists and the close collaboration of taste expert, Givaudan, Redefine Meat has digitally mapped more than 70 sensorial parameters into its Alt-Steak products, including premium beef cuts’ texture, juiciness, fat distribution and mouthfeel. Layer by layer, the company’s proprietary industrial-scale 3D food printers create the Alt-Steak products using Redefine Meat’s Alt-Muscle, Alt-Fat, and Alt-Blood plant-based formulations. By printing with multiple materials, Redefine Meat can create sustainable, high-protein, no-cholesterol steaks that look, cook, and taste like beef.

“Since day one of the company, we have been working on creating a tasty and affordable plant-based alternative to steaks, one of the most cherished food products and the driver of the entire meat industry,” says Eshchar Ben-Shitrit, CEO and co-founder of Redefine Meat. “To enable mass adoption, we knew that creating an alternative meat product that was both high in quality and nutritional composition would require new technologies and production processes never seen before in the food industry. Today’s announcement marks the start of a new era in alternative meat – the Alt-Steak era – driven by production processes that will accelerate the development of a wide range of alt-meat whole muscle products and create a sustainable alternative to raising and eating animals.”

“The importance of using precision 3D printing technology to achieve texture, color and flavor—and the combinations between them—cannot be overstated. By using separate formulations for muscle, fat and blood, we can focus on each individual aspect of creating the perfect Alt-Steak product. This is unique to our 3D printing technology and lets us achieve unprecedented control of what happens inside the matrix of alt-meat. Collaborating with an industry-leader like Givaudan has led to the creation of an Alt-Steak product that is not only healthy and sustainable, but also offers the satisfying flavours, textures and aromas of eating actual meat,” said Ben-Shitrit

Redefine Meat’s Alt-Steak products will be put to the test at a limited number of leading chef restaurants later this year. Incorporating feedback from high-level chefs and butchers, the company will then ramp up production of its 3D meat printers and alt-meat formulations ahead of market distribution in 2020.

Beyond Beef arrives on Australian shores

Plant-based mince that looks, cooks and tastes just like beef? Enter: Beyond Beef. The US-founded plant-based meat brand, Beyond Meat, has upped their product ante with this new addition – which will offer a versatile alternative protein choice to add to the weekly shop.

Whether you’re a vegetarian, vegan or meat-eater, the plant-based “beef” mince tastes as near as the real deal and offers consumers the choice to transform the mince into a meaty, plant-based masterpiece – think stuffed mushrooms, bolognaise, tacos and burgers.

Each pack of Beyond Beef contains more than four Beyond Burgers’ worth of mince and is now available to purchase at selected Coles stores.

Beyond Beef consists of plant-based pea protein and has no cholesterol, GMOs, soy or gluten. It packs more protein and iron than beef but with less saturated and total fat.
With many Australians recognising the health benefits of a predominantly plant-based diet, the demand for meat free products with high nutritional value has soared.

Plant-based food distributor Future Farm Co is responsible for bringing Beyond Meat to Australian and New Zealand shores and is focused on bringing the benefits of plant-based products to the mainstream.

Future Farm Co anticipates a positive response to the launch of Beyond Beef thanks to the already huge fanbase that exists in the Australian market for Beyond Meat’s range – the new mince product is set to elevate the plant-based offering available to Aussie consumers.
According to Future Farm Co, Aussie consumers of Beyond Meat® products are typically existing meat shoppers – who are looking for veggie substitutions a few times a week – and the addition of Beyond Beef is set to amplify this trend and encourage healthier and more sustainable alternatives.

Beyond Beef is more pricey than beef coming in at a RRP of $18 per 500g pack.

Pea, canola, oat and other plant proteins poised for rapid growth

Plant-based protein production has grown dramatically in order to meet the increasing demand coming from the swelling global population, expected to reach 10 billion by 2050. In the new report Plant Proteins: Present and Future Lux Research evaluates 24 crops and their attractiveness as plant protein sources.

Lux analysed 24 different plant protein sources on crop production factors globally and for three major regions: North America, Europe, and Asia. Overall, Lux identified soy, wheat, and rice as the top three “staple” crops for plant protein, with pea, canola, oat, and chickpea as the “alternative” up-and-comers.

For North America and Europe, soy and wheat are the No. 1 plant protein sources, respectively, but given their extensive nonfood uses, along with the general diversification of plant proteins, pea, oat, and canola are more attractive opportunities within these regions going forward. Oat and canola are particularly appealing, as numerous companies are already scaling up pea protein production, investing nearly half a billion dollars in facility construction since 2017.

Asia is in a unique position given that the region has a near monopoly on several crops. Two of these are rice and chickpea, with Asia responsible for 90 per cent and 75 per cent of global production, respectively. These are not as widely used for protein ingredients as the other short-listed crops, which highlights their untapped potential.

Three instances are having an impact on the plant protein space: the rise of insurgents like Beyond Meat; the proliferation of product launches from large multinational corporations (MNCs) like Tyson; and the onset of trade uncertainty from events like the U.S.-China trade war.

“The storylines signal the need for the diversity of protein sources as both startups and MNCs move beyond soy, and for those sources to be capable of not only supporting the increasing supply requirements of these companies but also regional self-sufficiency to mitigate trade risk,” said Lux research analyst and lead author of the report Thomas Hayes.

“Technology innovation will play an important role in unlocking new plant-based protein opportunities, especially when combined with sources that are affordable, accessible, and abundant,”  he said.

Gene editing or advanced breeding approaches will increase protein content in crops, while innovative extraction methods will enable new crops as sources of protein isolates and concentrates. Lux also predicts that novel processing technologies and ingredients will improve the sensory and nutritional qualities of plant-based proteins. Such innovations will allow growers to demand a premium, defray protein extraction costs downstream, further broaden the consumer appeal of plant-based products, and more.

Nestlé expands plant-based burger range

Nestlé is expanding its plant-based food range in the US and Switzerland.

The launches come just days after Nestlé announced its ambition to achieve zero net greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, including by offering more plant-based food and beverages.

In both countries, Nestlé is launching plant-based burgers and grounds, with ingredients and recipes customised to meet local tastes. All the products look and cook like raw beef and provide a juicy, meat-like taste and texture.

In the United States, Sweet Earth Foods has announced the launch of their newest products, the Awesome Burger and Awesome Grounds. Both deliver on the taste and texture of beef with the environmental and nutritional benefits offered by plant-based proteins.

READ MORE: Plant-based protein worth $25 billion by 2030

The Awesome Burger is made with yellow pea protein, resulting in a burger that is high in protein and fiber. Sweet Earth’s Awesome Grounds will provide the same plant-based protein in a ground version that allows greater flexibility to cook various meals and sides, such as meatballs and tacos. Acquired by Nestlé in 2017, Sweet Earth has over 60 plant-based products in their portfolio.

In Switzerland, Nestlé is introducing its Garden Gourmet Incredible Burger and the new Garden Gourmet Incredible Mince. The two add to the already expanding Garden Gourmet range in Switzerland, which also includes many ‘veggie-centric’ options. The burger is made from soy and wheat protein and the mince from soy protein. Both contain natural plant extracts – beetroot, carrot, and bell pepper – and vegetable fats including chopped coconut oil.

The new Garden Gourmet Incredible Mince is just as versatile and juicy as ground beef. It is easily shapeable, making it perfect to create balls or skewers that can be seasoned to taste. It can also be crumbled up in a pan, for example to make a delicious Bolognese sauce or ‘Chili Sin Carne’.

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