Alba Cheese prefers the environmental benefits of BioGone Stretch Wrap

Alba Cheese, a local manufacturer of high-quality, authentic Italian cheese is proud to say it uses stretch wrap from BioGone. BioGone produces a range of plastic wrapping and packaging products that will biodegrade away when sent to a landfill.

Initially some samples were provided to Alba and they found the products were good quality.  Once they understood the large environmental benefit of being biodegradable in landfills, they were even more enthusiastic to switch to it.  It gave them the confidence they were looking after the environment as well in their operations.

Alba cheese has a commitment to be as sustainable as they can in their operations. As the company grows, they are becoming more aware of what they can do more and products like BioGone’s fit their goals nicely. When asked what Alba though of BioGone’s products they replied, “Excellent product. Not that it is just environmentally friendly but excellent product compared to others we have tried in the past”.

Not only for their own peace of mind, Alba Cheese wants their customers know too they are going above and beyond to help the environment out. They believe not only will this promote their products, but it educates their customers that these better buying options are available.  Many companies are trying to be sustainable these days and Alba are a good example of how BioGone allows a company to achieve some of these goals.

BioGone is an Australian company founded after the owners realised that our normal operating practices in using plastic were doing a lot of harm to the environment.  Many products such as stretch wrap are only used for a one-way trip of a few hours then more than likely discarded to a landfill to sit there for several hundreds’s of years.  This happens 1000’s of times a day across Australia. Australia uses about 1.5 million tonnes of plastic a year and only a small percent is recycled.

Another way to look at it, we are using plastic products for a very short time but are leaving future generations to have to deal with it.  BioGone owners could not accept that and so started developing a range of common, single use plastic products that are used by various business types that once discarded to a landfill, the natural microbes could digest the plastic away as food. The method used to do this is to add in a proprietary organic additive to the plastic raw material. The additive has no change on the plastic properties except for when it is disposed to a microbe rich environment such as a landfill.   There the microbes see the food and start to digest it away and, in the process, break the polymer down so they can digest that too. The only bi-products are a biogas evolved and a biomass (humus) or plant fertiliser remaining. It is not a degradable action the results in small plastic bits remaining, but a full biodegradable process.

The biodegradation time frame is a question a lot of people ask. The easier way to answer it is to consider the biodegradation time factor can be thought of as 20 times faster than a conventional plastic of the same size. While this is not as fast as say an apple core biodegrading away, it is still quite fast relative to a conventional plastic.   Plus, it means we are dealing with our plastic waste in our lifetime, not leaving it for future generations to deal with.

For a number of its products BioGone is the only manufacturer in the world for them.  Products such as landfill-biodegradable packing tape, stretch wrap, Packing list Enclosed-type stick on envelopes, strapping and more are only produced by BioGone.

BioGone fully recognise this is not a panacea to the whole plastic problem. Their plastic has no benefits in the ocean or water ways for example as there are few microbes there to digest the plastic away. However, since most of our plastic waste does go to landfill, then this is a very good place to start. That is why they stress their materials are landfill-biodegradable as it tells the user where they have to dispose of the product in order for it to biodegrade

Another benefit of BioGone’s plastic products is that they are mainstream recyclable too.   Even encouraged. The additive stays inert in the plastic while it is reprocessed.  It doesn’t require any different processing equipment and the final product will not be any different.  Due to the additive being diluted down however, it is unlikely a new product from the recycled material would be landfill-biodegradable. BioGone also supplies some products made from home compostable plastics.

This are plant-based materials not fossil fuel based materials which many buyers are starting to seek out.   It has advantages of being quite fast to biodegrade in landfills or consumers home compost bins.  Its disadvantages are that it is a slight bit more costly and is not recyclable.  In many cases however this is a good sustainable option.

For Further information contact www.biogone.com.au

 

New AIP course: The New World of Plastics Technology – Polymers and recycling

Today, there are hundreds of identified ‘species’ of synthetic polymers. Any of these are available in a range of molecular masses, most can be influenced by processing conditions.? Therefore the choice in plastics is almost limitless. Polymer science is the subfield of materials science concerned with polymers, primarily synthetic polymers such as plastics. The field of polymer science includes researchers in multiple disciplines including chemistry, physics, and engineering.

This course is intended for those that have spent a number of years in some related plastics industry. This course is intended to extend those attending to new levels of understanding the complex world of polymer science. Every attendee will learn new aspects of polymers, test themselves and their ability of remembering what they know. All those wanting to know more about the complex world of polymer science are welcome. The course will cover certain aspects of organic chemistry, revisit the raw materials, syntheses, and applications, only touching on the manufacturing and moulding aspects. It will ensure that those attending are reminded of the main classes of plastic materials as a function of the molecular properties of polymers used in the plastics industry.

It will discuss the molecular structure of plastics in relation to the two main families of plastics, namely thermosets and thermoplastics. In addition we explore plastics recycling. Plastic is versatile and very cheap to produce, it’s no surprise that it’s used so much, but it doesn’t belong in our environment forever. Plastic recycling is the process of recovering scrap or waste plastic and reprocessing the material into useful products. Since the majority of plastic is non-biodegradable, recycling is a part of global efforts to reduce plastic in the waste stream, especially the approximately 8 million metric tonnes of waste plastic that enters the Earth’s ocean every year. We will learn how and what we can do about attaining a better environment with less plastics around.

Course objectives

  • Revisit the basic knowledge of polymer chemistry
  • Know how to quickly identify the mainstream plastics
  • Learn why we use plastics as much as we do, and what are the alternatives
  • The future of plastics and its correlation to recycling of plastics
  • Learning collection systems for recycled plastics
  • What do recyclers do with the plastics
  • What valuable products can be created from recycled plastics
  • Environmental considerations

Who should attend?

This course is  suited to anyone who has limited knowledge on polymers and plastics as a material. In addition, packaging technologists and designers, product developers, marketing personal, technical and production staff using packaging, sales and marketing reps will benefit from this course.

The new world of plastics technology

Bookings are now open for the fourth Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) virtual training course the ‘New World of Plastics Technology: Polymers & Recycling’ which will be held on 11 August 2020. This course is open to anyone to attend from anywhere in the world. The course trainer will be Prof Pierre Pienaar MSc, FAIP, CPP, Education Director – Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP).

Overview of course:
Today, there are hundreds of identified ‘species’ of synthetic polymers. Any of these are available in a range of molecular masses, most can be influenced by processing conditions. Therefore the choice in plastics is almost limitless. Polymer science is the subfield of materials science concerned with polymers, primarily synthetic polymers such as plastics. The field of polymer science includes researchers in multiple disciplines including chemistry, physics, and engineering.

This course is intended for those that have spent a number of years in some related plastics industry. This course is intended to extend those attending to new levels of understanding the complex world of polymer science. Every attendee will learn new aspects of polymers, test themselves and their ability of remembering what they know. All those wanting to know more about the complex world of polymer science are welcome. The course will cover certain aspects of organic chemistry, revisit the raw materials, syntheses, and applications, only touching on the manufacturing and moulding aspects. It will ensure that those attending are reminded of the main classes of plastic materials as a function of the molecular properties of polymers used in the plastics industry.

It will discuss the molecular structure of plastics in relation to the two main families of plastics, namely thermosets and thermoplastics. In addition we explore plastics recycling. Plastic is versatile and very cheap to produce, it’s no surprise that it’s used so much, but it doesn’t belong in our environment forever. Plastic recycling is the process of recovering scrap or waste plastic and reprocessing the material into useful products. Since the majority of plastic is non-biodegradable, recycling is a part of global efforts to reduce plastic in the waste stream, especially the approximately 8 million metric tonnes of waste plastic that enters the Earth’s ocean every year. We will learn how and what we can do about attaining a better environment with less plastics around.

Course objectives:

  • Revisit the basic knowledge of polymer chemistry
  • Know how to quickly identify the mainstream plastics
  • Learn why we use plastics as much as we do, and what are the alternatives
  • The future of plastics and its correlation to recycling of plastics
  • Learning collection systems for recycled plastics
  • What do recyclers do with the plastics
  • What valuable products can be created from recycled plastics
  • Environmental considerations

Companies shift to plastic packaging to avoid outspread of Covid-19

Sustainability has been a big trend in the past few years and many companies in the Asia-Pacific (APAC) region have switched to more eco-friendly alternatives, such as replacing plastic materials and removing single-use packaging. However, since the outbreak of coronavirus (Covid-19), companies may resort to plastic packaging to combat the spread of the pandemic putting the sustainability aspect in the back seat. Concerns around food hygiene due to Covid-19 could increase plastic packaging intensity which is likely to hurt the sustainability efforts of the industry in the near term, says GlobalData, a data and analytics company.

Covid-19 seems to have originated at a wholesale seafood and meat market in Wuhan. Following the epidemic, the Chinese government is likely to enforce tighter regulations to change meat handling and distribution practices. Distributing meat in plastic packaging is likely to reduce the risk of a future outbreak but it may negate some of the progress made towards sustainability goals.

Aseptic single-use packaging is back in fashion after food and beverage brand Yakult launched its first aseptic products on the Korean ambient market in Ecolean Air Aseptic lightweight packages. In addition, the adoption of disposable packaging is likely to gain traction due to the (temporary) rise in demand in food delivery and takeaway in the APAC region.

Arvind Kaila, Practice Head of Consumer Beverages at GlobalData, says: “Single-use packaging, which has faced lots of criticism in recent years because of environmental concerns, might be seen as a better packaging alternative from a ‘hygiene’ point of view because of limited handling/access of the inner products; which may hurt sustainability goals sustainability goals set forth by governing bodies and businesses alike.”

Covid-19 appears likely to create a long-term effect for online retail; persuading online-sceptic consumers to move spend away from physical stores in a bid to reduce time spent in public places. For Instance, lockdown in India started this week led to ‘panic stocking’ by consumers of all packaged food items, which will further drive plastic packaging in near term.

“However, understandably, these consumers’ views are likely to change for more hygiene-driven features in the short term, in which consumers may view disposable packaging as positive,” said Kaila.

Bans are effective, but not the endgame in solving the plastic problem

Plastic is an incredible material. It can be airtight and watertight, moulded to any shape, clear or coloured, shock-resistant, lightweight, and is chemically stable. Unfortunately, these last two features also mean plastic pollution poses a huge environmental problem.

In theory, plastic is highly recyclable. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET), typically used in drink bottles, can be recycled back into new drink bottles, or even upcycled into raincoats or clothing.

But for this to happen, the plastic waste must be clean and separated by single plastic type, which is challenging when a typical drink bottle consists of multiple plastics – the bottle cap, the label, and the bottle itself. This mixing or co-mingling of plastic means that more often than not, “recycling” becomes “downcycling”, whereby the co-mingled plastic is actually turned into a lower-value product (for example, soft plastic bags returned to a supermarket are often turned into park benches or fence posts).

This is, of course, is still a much better result than it ending up in our waterways or oceans, but given the low material grade of the downcycled product, the end result is an object ultimately destined for landfill due to its inability to be recycled further.

Another obstacle for recycling is that virgin plastic is made from oil, which means its price moves with the oil price, and when oil becomes cheap, the economics of recycling are less attractive. A volatile oil price over the past few years has made the business case for investing in recycling infrastructure and operations particularly challenging.

In landfill, plastic is relatively innocuous on a generational timeframe. On a geological timeline, however, everything underground is eventually churned to the surface, so burying it isn’t a sustainable solution for the planet.

Once plastic gets out into the biosphere, ultraviolet rays from the sun break it down into small, lightweight pieces that clog the ecological systems we depend on for clean air, water and food.

The most publicised challenge is the great mass of plastics accumulating in waterways and the oceans. These micro pieces are eaten by the diverse range of creatures that form the base of the global food chain, clogging their stomachs and effectively starving them on a full belly. Plastic has now become so ubiquitous in the food chain that it’s found in the most remote corners of the globe – in 90 per cent of sea bird stomachs, and in increasing concentrations in our bodies.

READ MORE: The role that sealable packaging plays in minimising food waste

Just over half of this ocean plastic is thought to be leakage from land, with the balance coming from contamination directly into the ocean by way of littering, fishing nets, lost cargo from ships etc.

With their huge catchment areas, the Amazon and Niger basins are significant contributors to ocean plastic pollution. Asia, though, with 15 of the world’s 20 most polluting rivers, is the plastic pollution epicentre. This is partly due to municipal waste mismanagement.

However, given the Western world has been shipping its contaminated, mixed plastic waste streams to Asia for decades with the expectation that Asia would magically make the problem go away, we’ve all contributed to this pollution. Last year, China declared it would no longer be the global plastic dumping ground, providing the rest of the world with a plastic reality check.

Rather than just looking for a new country in which to dump our waste, we need to rethink the services plastics provide, and how we can create systems to maintain the value of these finite materials as they move through the economy. The Victorian government is aiming to stimulate this change through the ban on the lightweight plastic shopping bags, due to come into force on 1 November.

India taking action
India, meanwhile, is taking its plastic action much further. Prime Minister Narendra Modi has announced his government is aiming to limit the consumption of single-use plastic – including bags, cups, plates, small bottles, straws and certain types of sachets – with expected restrictions on its manufacture and importation. His stated goal is to eliminate it by 2022.

The reality is that with its population density and management practices, plastic pollution isn’t just a global environmental issue; it has a direct impact on the quality of life across the country. As one of the two most populated nations on Earth, and a significant contributor to global plastic pollution, this commitment will hopefully deliver meaningful environmental benefits.

These types of bans help raise awareness of the issues and prompt individuals to rethink daily habits to reduce single-use plastic waste. Significant reductions have been measured in countries that already have “plastic bans” in place, including Ireland and China.

However, it wasn’t the ban on ozone-depleting substances alone that saved the ozone layer – it was the development of economically attractive alternatives that transformed the market.

Single-use plastics provide incredibly useful services. Storing and transporting basic needs such as food and beverages, they’ve become such a fundamental part of modern life that if we’re going to replace them, we need to find convenient and economically attractive alternatives. Further to this, if you’re a mobile food vendor, cheap and disposable packaging in which to sell your product can be fundamental to your livelihood.

Enter the circular economy, where products and material are maintained at their highest value, ideally in perpetuity. Biological materials (such as timber, food and soil) are managed in a regenerative cycle, where food waste is processed back into soil conditioner to sustain the system. Finite materials such as plastics and metals are designed for reuse, repair and, ultimately, economical recycling, maintaining the materials in a closed loop.

Rethink required
Solving the plastic challenge begins with rethinking the “job” we’re asking plastic to do, and how we can do it in a way that creates and retains value. For example, filing a reusable drink bottle with pristine Melbourne drinking water eliminates the energy and material value lost when we throw away single-use plastic bottles. Similarly, dining in with friends on reusable crockery is infinitely more valuable to our wellbeing than eating out of a disposal plastic container on the fly, or at your desk.

In the case of India, bringing products such as bowls and cutlery into the market that retain value after use will enable meaningful secondary markets to form – for example, collecting, cleaning and reselling those products.

As important as individual choices are, global challenges require political leadership to reshape our economic systems to enhance the human experience while protecting and regenerating the biosphere we all depend on for our quality of life and ultimate survival.

This will be explored in an upcoming Lens article, but in the meantime, political leadership is unlikely to self-emerge, especially in the current climate – it’ll be driven by individuals and communities calling for action and walking the talk.

So, although your reusable shopping bags and drink bottle aren’t going to solve the problem on their own, if enough of us show the way, the system will follow.

Unilever announces new commitments for packaging waste

Unilever has announced that by 2025 it will eliminate more than 100,000 tonnes of plastic packaging and collect and process more plastic packaging than it sells.

The company, owner of brands including Lipton, Ben & Jerry’s and Walls Ice Cream, has announced new commitments to reduce its plastic waste and help create a circular economy for plastics

Unilever has confirmed that by 2025 it will:

  • Halve its use of virgin plastic, by reducing its absolute use of plastic packaging by more than 100,000 tonnes and accelerating its use of recycled plastic.
  • Help collect and process more plastic packaging than it sells

This commitment makes Unilever the first major global consumer goods company to commit to an absolute plastics reduction across its portfolio.

Unilever is already on track to achieve its existing commitments to ensure all of its plastic packaging is reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025, and to use at least 25 per cent recycled plastic in its packaging, also by 2025.

“Plastic has its place, but that place is not in the environment. We can only eliminate plastic waste by acting fast and taking radical action at all points in the plastic cycle,” said company CEO Alan Jope.

“Our starting point has to be design, reducing the amount of plastic we use, and then making sure that what we do use increasingly comes from recycled sources. We are also committed to ensuring all our plastic packaging is reusable, recyclable or compostable.

“This demands a fundamental rethink in our approach to our packaging and products. It requires us to introduce new and innovative packaging materials and scale up new business models, like re-use and re-fill formats, at an unprecedented speed and intensity.”

Unilever’s commitment will require the business to help collect and process around 600,000 tonnes of plastic annually by 2025. This will be delivered through investment and partnerships which improve waste management infrastructure in many of the countries in which Unilever operates.

READ MORE: Preventing a global recycling armageddon

“Our vision is a world in which everyone works together to ensure that plastic stays in the economy and out of the environment. Our plastic is our responsibility and so we are committed to collecting back more than we sell, as part of our drive towards a circular economy. This is a daunting but exciting task which will help drive global demand for recycled plastic,” said Jope.

Since 2017, Unilever has been transforming its approach to plastic packaging through its ‘Less, Better, No’ plastic framework.

Through Less Plastic Unilever has explored new ways of packaging and delivering products – including concentrates, such as its new Cif Eco-refill which eliminates 75 per cent of plastic, and new refill stations for shampoo and laundry detergent rolled out across shops, universities and mobile vending in South East Asia.

Better plastic has led to pioneering innovations such as the new detectable pigment being used by Axe (Lynx) and TRESemmé , which makes black plastic recyclable, as it can now be seen and sorted by recycling plant scanners, and the Lipton ‘festival bottle’ which is made of 100% recycled plastic and is collected using a deposit scheme.

As part of No plastic, Unilever has brought to the market innovations including shampoo bars, refillable toothpaste tablets, cardboard deodorant sticks and bamboo toothbrushes. It has also signed up to the Loop platform, which is exploring new ways of delivering and collecting reusable products from consumers’ homes.

Plastics save on wear and tear

If you are a company that is in the business of manufacturing components for plant and machinery, it pays to do your homework on the type of material you use.

Plastic Machining Solutions is based out of South west Sydney, and director Django Rodriguez has been in the business for more than 30 years.

He knows his products inside out, and makes a lot of componentry for processing plants, especially those in the food and beverage industry. Materials matter to him. It is the difference between a good job and a great job.

The company manufactures all conveyor components from scratch including sprockets, as well as tracking systems that people put their conveyor belts or chains onto.

“Normally, somebody will give me a drawing of what they want, I’ll tell them the material that would suit it, and I go ahead and make it,” said Rodriguez.

A lot of the products he makes are from plastic, so he turns to plastics’ specialist, E-Plas, for his materials. He has been using the company for a long time and is particular about the type of products he uses.

“We mainly use their TIVAR range, PTFE products as well as some of their superior modified plastic materials,” he said. “These products are good for sliding properties and wearing properties. This means those on the shop floor can run their conveyors without lubrication. There is no drag and that’s because there are special additives in some of these higher spec materials that create less wear. We use TIVAR HPV material when we manufacture conveyor tracks.

“The E-Plas product will last longer, which means there will be less downtime,” said Rodriguez. “If I was to use the normal ultra-high – just the standard ultra-high – companies would need to replace components more often because it would wear quicker.

Other types of plastics the company sources from E-Plas include oil-grade versions, which are ideal for the food industry due to their hygienic properties, and polycarbonate, Perspex and acrylic that are used as guard rails for safety reasons on some of the machines.

And it is this long-lasting aspect of these products that is the key not only to satisfying Plastic Machining Solutions as a customer of E-Plas, but also the former’s clients in turn.
And there are upsides for Rodriguez’s company, too. His tools last longer.

“Another thing I like about these products is, with the solid lubricant additive for instance, it is much easier to machine,” he said. “The tools don’t heat up as much. In fact, if you used this material more, your tools would last longer. The appearance of the product is also high quality.”

Rodriguez jokingly said there is only one downside for him, and even that has an upside in the long run.

“The only downside for me is that I don’t get to supply my clients as often because the E-Plas material lasts longer,” he said. “However, at the end of the day, if these plastics solve their problem, they will come to me for other things. That is the idea. To have a relationship where you can get most of their work for other areas as well. It’s a very good product. I totally recommend it.”

Food safety drives demand for high performance plastics in advanced cleaning processes

Higher safety demands faced by food, beverage and agribusiness processors and packagers are driving demand for advanced engineering plastics to withstand the demands of the latest cleaning and hygiene systems.

Clean in Place (CIP) systems, enzyme systems and aseptic packaging are important areas where such plastics can offer high performance in terms of resistance to temperatures, radiation, chemicals and water.

Efficient food packaging equipment no longer has to be disassembled for cleaning, being fitted instead with a built-in “flush” (or CIP Clean in Place) system, says Pat Flood, NSW Manager of the national and international engineered plastics specialist Cut To Size Plastics.

Acid-based cleaning solutions are automatically routed through CIP machines’ plumbing so the tear-down and set-up cycles that previously took many hours can be reduced to a matter of minutes.

Better hygiene and equipment utilisation outcomes are also produced by advanced agribusiness systems where enzymes are used for cleaning tanks and equipment such as ultrafiltration membranes or heat exchangers in the dairy industry, for example.

“Both CIP and enzyme systems make demands on the materials with which they come in contact. CIP systems are generally acid-based or, more commonly, chlorine-based. Depending upon the concentration, these cleaners can be moderately to extremely caustic. Plastics such as our Wearlyte PET (polyethylene terephthalate) are highly resistant to acid and chlorine. At the same time, its non-porous surface resists staining, clearly outperforming widely used alternatives,” said Flood.

Wearlyte PET’s dimensional stability, excellent wear resistance, high strength and its ability to be used continuously at higher temperatures also make it an ideal candidate for replacing stainless steel components. For example, coupled with its stiffness and ease of fabrication, Wearlyte is commonly used in food presses. Here too, the material resists the highly-chlorinated sanitising solutions.

Packaging

For packaging food in plastic containers under sterile, or aseptic, conditions, a variety of engineering plastics can be selected to operate in the higher operating temperatures required to kill bacteria. Under these conditions, traditional materials like polyethylene may not provide adequate physical strength, says Flood. Cut to Size products such as PEEK (Polyether ether ketone) High Temperature, on the other hand, retains its high mechanical and impact strength, stiffness and dimensional stability at elevated temperatures. It is one of the few plastics compatible with ultra-high vacuum applications.

In addition, PEEK thermoplastics offer an excellent wear resistance over a wide range of working conditions. As a result, for example, distribution valves made of such materials are increasingly replacing stainless steel parts, which cause valve housings to wear easily and result in high maintenance costs.

Materials such as Wearlyte PET are also preferred over stainless steel in order to minimise wear of the expensive mating part in vacuum shoes on high-speed, high-volume food packaging lines.

Cut to Size’s general-purpose Wearace grade, meanwhile, is especially suited to create durable wear components because of its excellent versatility, dimensional stability and good wear properties. Easier to machine than stainless steel, Wearace is a superior material because of its limited expansion and low moisture absorption during process and cleaning applications.

Cut To Size Plastics manufactures components for applications across Australasia and the Asia-Pacific from its Head Office in Sydney, where facilities include CNC machining facilities coupled with GibbsCAM and Solidworks software.

Snickers recalled as plastics found in chocolate bars

Mars, one of the world's biggest food companies, has recalled chocolate bars and other products in 55 countries after a piece of plastic was found in a Snickers bar in Germany, according to a Reuters report.

All of the recalled products, which include Mars, Snickers and Milky Way bars, were manufactured at a Dutch factory in Veghel, a Mars spokeswoman said on Tuesday. They were sold in European countries including Germany, France and Britain, and in certain countries in Asia.

"We cannot be sure that this plastic was only in that particular Snickers," a spokeswoman from Mars Netherlands said. "We do not want any products on the market that may not meet our quality requirements, so we decided to take them all back."

It was not immediately clear how much the complex recall would cost the company, which is unlisted and therefore does not disclose detailed financial information. The spokeswoman declined to comment on financial implications of the recall, which is the first to affect the factory.

Mars Netherlands said it was working closely with the Dutch food safety authority on the matter, according to a statement.

The recall affected all Mars and Snickers products, Milky Way Minis and Miniatures as well as certain kinds of Celebrations confectionery boxes with best-before dates ranging from June 19, 2016 to Jan. 8, 2017. Those dates may not be the same in other countries, the spokeswoman said.

Dow Chemical releases High Performance Packaging Resins

A new family of resins which offer high performance levels for packaging has been launched by the Dow Chemical Company’s Packaging and Specialty Plastics business.

INNATE aims to provide new packaging opportunities through balance, processing ease, and improved sustainability profiles that will empower customers.

David Parrillo, global R&D director for Dow Packaging and Specialty Plastics, said “The chemistry behind INNATE resins allows customers to control properties like never before to create a new standard of performance through a combination of film stiffness, toughness and processability, all from one packaging resin.”

The INNATE product is expected to define and create new market categories ranging from flexible food packaging to heavy-duty industrial shipping sacks.

Dow Resins offers film toughness without compromising stiffness and a processing ease that is not otherwise found in other precision combinations delivering food, consumer and industrial packages. 

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