Bespoke flooring solutions available for small and large beverage plants

Food hygiene and safety are critical in an industry where traceability is a key plank on which some brands live or die. And it’s just not the source of the product where traceability comes into its own, there are the processing aspects, too.

Australian food and beverage manufacturing and processing have a good worldwide reputation when it comes to the quality of its processing plants. As well as having high-end technologies, the country’s safety and hygiene standards are up there with the best in the world. There is a reason the rest of the world covets produce made on these shores.

This reputation doesn’t come by accident. It is due to diligent, and sometimes overbearing government standards and regulations that make Australian-made food and beverages popular around the globe.

It is also due to the commitment by service providers who build the plant and machinery that make up this important primary industry.

Flooring is a key component of any food or beverage plant, but it’s not just a case of laying a concrete slab and hoping for the best. There are many considerations that need taking into account.

“First, the flooring, will have to be safe underfoot,” said Tony Miller, who is director of flooring specialist, Roxset. “In other words it has to be a finish that’s slip resistant.

“Second, it needs to be graded to floor waste because they’ll have a lot of liquids about, not only during the cleaning process, but for general processing, too.

“Third, the floor should conform to Food Safe Australia regulations. From the point of view it needs to be seamless, impervious, and have a radius cove at the floor wall intersection.
“Finally, there is the aspect of cleaning depending on what sort of chemicals they use. If they use a CIP, or caustic solution for cleaning, then they need a floor that doesn’t wear away.”

Miller has been in the flooring business for 35 years and knows the pitfalls that customers – especially those who are starting on their manufacturing and processing journey – can fall into if they don’t get the right type of flooring in place. When Roxset first visits clients, usually there is a general awareness about the regulations and standards that need to be met, but it still pays to get expert advice.

“Not only is there an expectation from regulators that standards are met, but end-users and customers – the like of Coles and Woolworths – that are going to buy a product from a particular beverage manufacturer might send in their own auditors. They will come in and make sure these standards are being met. They will also have an audit trail, which goes through and looks at all aspects of what the manufacturer is doing and they would expect it to meet and certain standard. If it doesn’t, they are not likely to buy it.”

Traceability is where the audit trail comes in. According to Miller, these companies would expect manufacturers to be able to demonstrate that they have followed procedures and at various demarcation points it has been signed off.

“There may be a recording made of things like temperatures and bacteria counts and all sorts of things could be incorporated into the audit trail,” he said. “And that is where a HACCP system is good. It details the various aspects of an audit that need to be met so that management has a guideline and something to follow.”

While the type of flooring that Roxset produces is top-end, it is the outcome that is important. Miller knows that when it comes to building a plant that is up to state or federal standards then it is the whole package that is important – and that can come at a cost.

“Every aspect of the building is going to be expensive, but they are upfront costs,” he said. “You can’t operate a business without drainage, without proper equipment and it just falls into that category. You can’t be expected to run a business without proper ceiling, wall and floor finishes.”

When it comes to beverage manufacturing such as boutique breweries and distilleries, Miller not only can supply the right type of floor for the environment, but also give advice on how to make it last as long as possible.

“In beverage manufacturing, we have a client whose floor we laid over 20 years ago and they have never had to replace it,” he said. “It comes down to a couple of things. One is maintenance – if they are using the correct cleaning procedures and are maintaining the floor correctly, the floor will last a lot longer. If they are abusing the floor, and they do have to drive traffic on it and people are wilful in their actions, of course they can damage it.”

In a working environment like a beverage manufacturing place, Miller recommends the epoxy floor be a minimum of 6mm in depth, and that will give users in excess of 20 years of life. Roxset also puts an extensive warranty on it that can range from about seven to 10 years depending on what it assesses the activity is occurring on the floor and the state of the existing building. Miller also said that the type of surface that the floor is going to be is something Roxset can design for the customer. Roxset tailors the slip-resistance of that floor to meet the requirement of the individual customer.

“For example, if someone is involved in completely dry production then they don’t need the same level of slip-resistance as some of them where there is a lot of liquid on the floor ,” he said. “If you don’t have a sufficient slip-resistant medium on the floor, and you’ve got something like a banana skin on it, you are going to have a problem.”

Roxset specialises in epoxy finishes, which look smooth and easy to clean. Is that the reality?

“Epoxy is very easy to clean,” said Miller. “Inherent in a slip-resistant finish is the fact is what you need to do the requirement of how you clean the surface as opposed to something that is completely smooth. It is not something you are going to go around with a mop and bucket and mop. That is not compatible with a slip-resistant surface. Captivating scrubbing is.”

One thing that Miller is keen to push is that Roxset is not a company that’s products are a one-size fits all. It designs bespoke floors for a range of different environments in the food and beverage industry.

“We’re not an off-the-shelf product,” said Miller. “What we are doing is tailoring the floor in situ to meet their individual requirements. They are bespoke solutions.

“What we decided to do was make our own product to suit the requirement that we see in the individual operation depending on what they are doing. We look at what liquids might go on the floor; what contaminant might go on the floor; and what chemicals might go on the floor. We design to their circumstance so they are getting the best possible for finish for their particular requirement rather than give them a generic product that might not suit what they are doing.”

Miller said it is important to differentiate between different types of flooring because the requirements for say, an abattoir over a gin distillery, are far apart – different chemicals are needed.

“If it is a lamb abattoir for instance, they can have solid particles of fat on a floor,” he said. “Well, if you don’t have a certain degree of non-slip there, you are going to have major problem. There is going to be a lot of blood going on the floor.

“However, in a beverage manufacturer, it may be just constituent parts of whatever the product they are making. It might have high sugar content but it hasn’t got any fat, so the slip resistance doesn’t need to be to the same extent. That is why we tailor the floor to meet the expectation.”

Finally, Miller said if customers were to remember one thing when putting down a new floor, it’s this: “It needs to reach a certain standard from the point of view of beverage safety, which in other words it can’t harbour bacteria. That practically means it needs to be impervious, which is what we offer.”

Bespoke flooring solutions available for small and large beverage plants

Food hygiene and safety are critical in an industry where traceability is a key plank on which some brands live or die. And it’s just not the source of the product where traceability comes into its own, there are the processing aspects, too.

Australian food and beverage manufacturing and processing have a good worldwide reputation when it comes to the quality of its processing plants. As well as having high-end technologies, the country’s safety and hygiene standards are up there with the best in the world. There is a reason the rest of the world covets produce made on these shores.

This reputation doesn’t come by accident. It is due to diligent, and sometimes overbearing government standards and regulations that make Australian-made food and beverages popular around the globe.

It is also due to the commitment by service providers who build the plant and machinery that make up this important primary industry.

Flooring is a key component of any food or beverage plant, but it’s not just a case of laying a concrete slab and hoping for the best. There are many considerations that need taking into account.

“First, the flooring, will have to be safe underfoot,” said Tony Miller, who is director of flooring specialist, Roxset. “In other words it has to be a finish that’s slip resistant.

“Second, it needs to be graded to floor waste because they’ll have a lot of liquids about, not only during the cleaning process, but for general processing, too.

“Third, the floor should conform to Food Safe Australia regulations. From the point of view it needs to be seamless, impervious, and have a radius cove at the floor wall intersection.
“Finally, there is the aspect of cleaning depending on what sort of chemicals they use. If they use a CIP, or caustic solution for cleaning, then they need a floor that doesn’t wear away.”

Miller has been in the flooring business for 35 years and knows the pitfalls that customers – especially those who are starting on their manufacturing and processing journey – can fall into if they don’t get the right type of flooring in place. When Roxset first visits clients, usually there is a general awareness about the regulations and standards that need to be met, but it still pays to get expert advice.

“Not only is there an expectation from regulators that standards are met, but end-users and customers – the like of Coles and Woolworths – that are going to buy a product from a particular beverage manufacturer might send in their own auditors. They will come in and make sure these standards are being met. They will also have an audit trail, which goes through and looks at all aspects of what the manufacturer is doing and they would expect it to meet and certain standard. If it doesn’t, they are not likely to buy it.”

Traceability is where the audit trail comes in. According to Miller, these companies would expect manufacturers to be able to demonstrate that they have followed procedures and at various demarcation points it has been signed off.

“There may be a recording made of things like temperatures and bacteria counts and all sorts of things could be incorporated into the audit trail,” he said. “And that is where a HACCP system is good. It details the various aspects of an audit that need to be met so that management has a guideline and something to follow.”

While the type of flooring that Roxset produces is top-end, it is the outcome that is important. Miller knows that when it comes to building a plant that is up to state or federal standards then it is the whole package that is important – and that can come at a cost.

“Every aspect of the building is going to be expensive, but they are upfront costs,” he said. “You can’t operate a business without drainage, without proper equipment and it just falls into that category. You can’t be expected to run a business without proper ceiling, wall and floor finishes.”

When it comes to beverage manufacturing such as boutique breweries and distilleries, Miller not only can supply the right type of floor for the environment, but also give advice on how to make it last as long as possible.

“In beverage manufacturing, we have a client whose floor we laid over 20 years ago and they have never had to replace it,” he said. “It comes down to a couple of things. One is maintenance – if they are using the correct cleaning procedures and are maintaining the floor correctly, the floor will last a lot longer. If they are abusing the floor, and they do have to drive traffic on it and people are wilful in their actions, of course they can damage it.”

In a working environment like a beverage manufacturing place, Miller recommends the epoxy floor be a minimum of 6mm in depth, and that will give users in excess of 20 years of life. Roxset also puts an extensive warranty on it that can range from about seven to 10 years depending on what it assesses the activity is occurring on the floor and the state of the existing building. Miller also said that the type of surface that the floor is going to be is something Roxset can design for the customer. Roxset tailors the slip-resistance of that floor to meet the requirement of the individual customer.

“For example, if someone is involved in completely dry production then they don’t need the same level of slip-resistance as some of them where there is a lot of liquid on the floor ,” he said. “If you don’t have a sufficient slip-resistant medium on the floor, and you’ve got something like a banana skin on it, you are going to have a problem.”

Roxset specialises in epoxy finishes, which look smooth and easy to clean. Is that the reality?

“Epoxy is very easy to clean,” said Miller. “Inherent in a slip-resistant finish is the fact is what you need to do the requirement of how you clean the surface as opposed to something that is completely smooth. It is not something you are going to go around with a mop and bucket and mop. That is not compatible with a slip-resistant surface. Captivating scrubbing is.”

One thing that Miller is keen to push is that Roxset is not a company that’s products are a one-size fits all. It designs bespoke floors for a range of different environments in the food and beverage industry.

“We’re not an off-the-shelf product,” said Miller. “What we are doing is tailoring the floor in situ to meet their individual requirements. They are bespoke solutions.

“What we decided to do was make our own product to suit the requirement that we see in the individual operation depending on what they are doing. We look at what liquids might go on the floor; what contaminant might go on the floor; and what chemicals might go on the floor. We design to their circumstance so they are getting the best possible for finish for their particular requirement rather than give them a generic product that might not suit what they are doing.”

Miller said it is important to differentiate between different types of flooring because the requirements for say, an abattoir over a gin distillery, are far apart – different chemicals are needed.

“If it is a lamb abattoir for instance, they can have solid particles of fat on a floor,” he said. “Well, if you don’t have a certain degree of non-slip there, you are going to have major problem. There is going to be a lot of blood going on the floor.

“However, in a beverage manufacturer, it may be just constituent parts of whatever the product they are making. It might have high sugar content but it hasn’t got any fat, so the slip resistance doesn’t need to be to the same extent. That is why we tailor the floor to meet the expectation.”

Finally, Miller said if customers were to remember one thing when putting down a new floor, it’s this: “It needs to reach a certain standard from the point of view of beverage safety, which in other words it can’t harbour bacteria. That practically means it needs to be impervious, which is what we offer.”

Floor coating keeps bacteria at bay

Centennial Vineyards is a very impressive property incorporating a restaurant, winery and event’s facility for international performing artists, it is located just minutes from the township of Bowral in the Southern Highlands of NSW. It is a picturesque part of New South Wales that has frequent visitors from Sydney’s metropolitan area, as well as those from overseas.

The premium cool climate vineyard is set at more than 760m in altitude, which ensures the grapes ripen slowly with enhanced flavour and intensity. The vines at Centennial Vineyards are planted on more than 80 acres consisting of Chardonnay, Riesling, Pinot Gris, Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir, Gewurztraminer, Gruner Ventliner and Tempranillo.

The chief winemaker, Tony Cogsriff, has had nearly 20 years working with Centennial. He grew up in New Zealand and after graduating from university worked with many well-known New Zealand wineries before emigrating to Australia to join John Large, who is a successful wine industry retailer and entrepreneur who runs Centennial Winery. Cogsriff has won many accolades for his high-quality wines and sets a benchmark that matches the impressive surrounds of the vineyard.

Like any business, maintenance is something that all companies have to keep up-to-date in order to meet strict regulations within the food and beverage industries. This is no different for Centennial Vineyards when it came to the flooring in its winery.

The existing floor coating was deteriorating from heavy traffic and bacteria build up from yeast and salts, which was causing a dangerous hazard for forklifts. There were also potential contamination issues for the wine.

A new coating was needed, and it had to have several features. It needed to handle heavy and light wear, as well as ongoing wet conditions form the grapes and wash down. Centennial Vineyards asked Roxset HACCP Coatings to provide an impervious non-slip, highly protective and safe coating in its production and cellar areas.

The Roxset SE 6m coating system in the company’s mid grey was installed covering more than 600sqm to key production areas around fermentation, bottling, cellar and barrel areas.

Roxset epoxy screeds and ceramic additives have assisted in providing long-lasting protection to exposed concrete. A high glass finish was applied around coving and an epoxy detail formed around the slotted drains for protection.

Features of the system include a high level of protection from contamination, seamless non-slip finish, and it is long lasting and durable.

“We are delighted with the incredibly hard and durable surface of the SE solution from Roxset,” said Cogsriff. “Protecting our sought after pedigree wines from bacteria build up as a result of possible chipped and exposed surface areas is a critical part of our processing. We now have a fantastic, fresh clean environment which is impressive for both visitors and staff.”

Flooring meets strict food code requirements

Rydges Hotels and Resorts is a hotel accommodation and hospitality provider that operates in Australia, New Zealand and England.

Rydges accommodates one million guests annually across a range of market segments. It provides mid to upscale accommodation, catering from corporate travellers to sophisticated upmarket resorts.

Roxset Health and Safety Flooring, a specialist in food and beverage coating solutions for over 30 years, has been providing tailored HACCP Grade VOC non-toxic flooring to a number of key Rydges properties in Australia since 2008. Currently, five properties have been upgraded with the Roxset SE ultra-hygienic coating in food and beverage preparation and associated areas.

Due to the age of some of the properties, the main kitchens were suffering from maintenance challenges, specifically as the traditional kitchen floors were installed with either large ceramic tiles or vinyl coatings. These coverings present on-going problems with grout cleaning and water penetration through progressive cracking, which led to serious hygiene and slip hazards and would not meet the hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) food safe requirements.

Australia is governed by a Food Standards Code. A new code came into effect on 1 March 2016. HACCP is a systematic approach to identifying, evaluating and controlling food safety hazards. A hazard is anything that could make food dangerous to eat and can be, microbiological (e.g. bacteria, virus, fungi) chemical (e.g cleaning products), physical (e.g broken glass, fingernail, hair).

Food safety legislation has specific requirements for food preparation areas relating to the condition and design and includes:
• Floors – should be constructed of a material that is easy to clean and safe to walk on and maintained in sound condition.
• Walls – should be made of durable materials that are washable, non-toxic, easy to clean and maintain.

Over time, Roxset has been upgrading the Rydges Hotel group kitchens by either replacing the vinyl or laying a high-grade seamless epoxy HACCP food grade system over non-drummy tiles. The benefit of epoxy is that when the resin and hardener are mixed together they form a rigid plastic material. This material is strong, durable, resistant and bonds to most base layers. The epoxy is so strong it is used in heavy traffic areas such as industrial environments.

The Roxset SE 3 trowel-on coating is a tailored food grade system which addresses coving, wall intersections and levelling, and falls to drains to ensure rapid cleaning regimes are optimised, especially in busy hotel kitchens.

Roxset SE is a tailored, hand-built protection coating built up with selected aggregates to allow a cure thickness of 4-6mm and has a R12 slip rating.

Roxset recently completed a 380sqm area at the Rydges Hotel in Parramatta, which included the main kitchen, cool rooms, passageway and bar area. These areas are now protected from slippage and any impact or chemical spills and will perform well in excess of 10 years, while meeting all requirements of HACCP’s strict hygiene criteria.

Roxset makes factory floors that won’t crack

Food processing floors take a particular hammering on a daily, sometimes 24/7, basis.

These floors face frequent contact with heat, chemicals, and spills as well as heavy equipment and machinery.

Avoiding the need to regularly replace floors, saves money, time and unnecessary headaches. A concrete floor for example, will not last long in a factory setting without cracking under a heavy load and chemical exposure. 

They are almost impossible to maintain and they risk high exposure to failure of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) compliance.

READ: Roxset helps with specialised flooring for Vasse Felix winery

Luckily, there are better options than opting for a concrete floor that may crack under pressure.

Roxset SE’s industrial factory floor is specifically designed and tailored for food, beverage and meat processing facilities. It offers a seamless, clean and safe floor that supports a productive environment while withstanding heavy use for many years.

The Roxset SE solution for food factories is both HACCP and Slip Resistant (R13) to meet the high safety grade. Additionally, the aggregate can be varied to suit the various traffic areas of the factory whether it be foot, forklift or trolley.

Industrial grade coatings offer a seamless surface free of joints, cracks and crevices. Roxset uses epoxy – a thermosetting polymer, which is available in three formulations for a seamless floor. 

The available formulations are water based, solvent based and 100 per cent solid based.

They allow for varying thicknesses, from 3ml to 10ml, depending on a factory’s needs. Epoxy bonds well to concrete and is ideal for use as a resurfacing agent for old or worn concrete. 

The best epoxy formulation is 100 per cent solid for an extremely hard, thick and impact resistant coating.

Cleanliness is a top priority that Roxset has captured in its floors. Limiting the spread of diseases such as listeria is critical.

The Roxset SE industrial floor reduces the risk of contamination in areas around drains so they do not harbour bacteria.

This is done with an epoxy coating, which will dramatically limit these dangerous harbourage points.

Roxset helps with specialised flooring for Vasse Felix winery

The Margaret River Wine Region is positioned in the south-west corner of Western Australia.

Vasse Felix is Margaret River’s founding wine estate and was established in 1967. The estate includes four vineyards throughout the region, which have been selected for their unique topography, microclimates and natural drainage.

The chief winemaker of Vasse Felix, Virginia Willcock, has more than two decades of Margaret River winemaking experience.

Among her many achievements, Willcock was awarded “Winemaker of the Year” in 2012.

READ: Taking food safety to the floor

The winery building in Cowaramup had significant areas of failing and worn concrete showing visible aggregate, coving breakdown, floor drainage problems and underfoot safety risks.

Vasse Felix turned to Roxset to offer specialised services to resolve these challenges.

“Roxset has delivered an incredibly hard and durable surface with its SE solution,” said Willcock. “It protects a very valuable winery floor asset that was deteriorating. Working with the diversity of yeast from each vineyard section, and fermenting with wild yeast, it is critical a dominating culture does not permeate from unhygienic floors. We are pleased the new floor coating has given our winery a fresh clean finish which makes it a positive environment both mentally and physically for our staff.”

The Roxset SE coating system provides the ultimate protection required by wineries who have deteriorating concrete with the challenge of bacteria build-up of wild yeast, acids and salts and the impact of forklift traffic.

Working with Willcock, Roxset upgraded over 1000sqm of floor coatings with the Roxset SE solution to key areas of the winery including; fermenting, bottling, cellar and barrel-washing areas. Roxset epoxy screeds and ceramic additives have assisted in providing long-lasting protection to exposed concrete.

The new Roxset floor will withstand constant forklift traffic and barrel-wash impact.

Roxset is an expert in the installation of high-grade seamless floor coatings to the wine industry over the past 30 years.