Women In Industry Awards’ finalists announced

The 2020 Women in Industry Awards’ finalists have been announced, including several that have an association with the food and beverage industry. This includes Kylie Jones from Diageo Australia who is a finalist in the Mentor of the Year category, and Rebecca Parnell from the Artisan Food Company who is a finalist in the Excellence in Engineering category.

Jones has taken numerous steps to forge close relationships with women within the broader STEM industry, with a particular focus on manufacturing and operations.

Jones was selected as 2019/2020 Superstar of STEM, a program designed to increase the profile of Australian female scientists. n 2019, as part of that program, she networked with fellow STEM graduates, academics, business and industry representatives to share her career as a female scientist in industry, who is passionate about being a role model for young women and girls interested in a STEM career.

Jones is on on the Diversity Committee for her employer, Diageo Australia, who has been recognised as an Inclusive Employer by the Diversity Council of Australia. As part of that committee, Jones is involved in organising events throughout the year.

Parnell has a broad knowledge and experience in the manufacturing field having worked for 17 years across multiple fields including the pharmaceutical, veterinary and food industries. Parnell’s current role has found her working for Artisan Food Company where she lives Artisan’s motto “for the love of sharing”. She openly shares her knowledge and capability and uses training and education to increase the level of inclusion of women, both internally and externally. She is a change agent, whether on the manufacturing floor or working with government or regulatory bodies, and she employs corporate strategies for cultural change including both education and inclusion. 

Due to COVID-19 there will not be a physical event. Winners will be announced in late August.

Social Leader of the Year
Alanna Vial – BlueScope
Althea Papinczak – Women in Design and Construction (WIDAC)
Elizabeth Taylor – RedR International
Gemma Murphy – QBE Insurance
Jackie Lewis-Gray – BAE Systems Australia
Jane Tiller – Monash University
Sarah McSwiney – Boeing Aerostructures Australia

Rising Star of the Year
Proudly sponsored by Atlas Copco
Alicia Heskett – Shell Australia (QGC)
Helen Vu – BOC
Kate Robertson – Geological Survey of SA
Kate Stanbury – Stantec Australia
Keren Reynolds – BAE Systems Australia
Louise Azzopardi – WesTrac
Nima Sherpa – BHP
Rose Lindner – MMG
Vera Milutinovic – Inenco

Business Development Success of the Year
Caroline Murray – APS Industrial
Jackie Thew – Abrasive Media Supplies
Marika Logan – Elgas
Rachael Ashfield – ifm
Stefanie Frawley – Colliers International
Sonia Turner – Scope Systems

Industry Advocacy Award
Elizabeth Molyneux – AGL Energy
Hayley Jarick – Supply Chain Sustainability School
Jacquelene Brotherton – Transport Women Australia Limited
Jodie Sainsbury – Kickass Women
Joy Marrocco – AGL
Rose Read – National Waste & Recycling Industry Council
Shay Chalmers – Strategic Engineering
Sonja Malcolm – Sydney Metro

Safety Advocacy Award
Proudly sponsored by BOC Ltd
Annastasia Denigan – Cement Australia
Lyndal Denny – Women In Trucking Australia
Maddy Holloway – CITIC Pacific Mining
Nadine Yousef – Sydney Trains
Natalia Trewin – WesTrac Pty Ltd
Noelani Reardon – Transport for NSW
Terese Withington – Weir Minerals Australia Ltd
Tracey MacDonald – BAE Systems Australia

Mentor of the Year
Clytie Dangar – CRC ORE
Dayle Stevens – AGL Energy
Kylie Jones – Diageo Australia
Marie Varrasso – Officeworks

Excellence in Manufacturing
Josie Costanzo – Brickworks Building Products
Marina Melik – Boeing Aerostructures Australia
Rebecca Parnell – Artisan Food Company Pty Ltd
Rochelle Avinu – Leica Biosystems
Samantha McDonald – Bluescope

Excellence in Mining
Carlie Hayward – BHP
Clytie Dangar – CRC ORE
Jacqueline Madsen – Caterpillar
Kim Parascos – iVolve Industrial Technology
Rose Lindner – MMG
Sarah Withell – BHP
Terese Withington – Weir Minerals Australia Ltd

Excellence in Engineering
Proudly sponsored by BAE Systems Australia
Elizabeth Taylor – RedR International
Jane MacMaster – Engineers Australia
Jo Withford – Department of Transport
Lesley DeGaris – Boeing Aerostructures Australia
Lidija Dumbaloska – Sydney Trains
Mandy Petrides – Bosch Australia

Excellence in Transport
Agnes Lesson – Elgas
Camilla Drover – Transport for NSW
Danelle Kempton – Dananni Haulage
Jane Gillespie – Arup
Lyndal Denny – Women In Trucking Australia
Melissa Strong – Lindsay Australia Limited

2020 Women in Industry awards announced

Women in Industry Awards have grown in stature and size year after year and are a critical component in celebrating the success of some outstanding women in traditionally male-dominated industrial sectors such as mining, manufacturing, engineering and transport.

Through acknowledging these incredible achievements and individuals, the program hopes to shine a light on these industries as great career choices for other women.

This year has seen a record number of nominees across all 10 categories, furthermore this year’s nominations come from the highest number of businesses and organisations the programme has ever seen, demonstrating the broad reach and increasing awareness of the Awards. Here are the finalists in each category

Social Leader of the Year Finalists
Alanna Vial – BlueScope
Althea Papinczak – Women in Design and Construction (WIDAC)
Elizabeth Taylor – RedR International
Gemma Murphy – QBE Insurance
Jackie Lewis-Gray – BAE Systems Australia
Jane Tiller – Monash University
Sarah McSwiney – Boeing Aerostructures Australia

Rising Star of the Year Finalists
Proudly sponsored by Atlas Copco
Alicia Heskett – Shell Australia (QGC)
Helen Vu – BOC
Kate Robertson – Geological Survey of SA
Kate Stanbury – Stantec Australia
Keren Reynolds – BAE Systems Australia
Louise Azzopardi – WesTrac
Nima Sherpa – BHP
Rose Lindner – MMG
Vera Milutinovic – Inenco

Business Development Success of the Year Finalists
Caroline Murray – APS Industrial
Jackie Thew – Abrasive Media Supplies
Marika Logan – Elgas
Rachael Ashfield – ifm
Stefanie Frawley – Colliers International
Sonia Turner – Scope Systems

Industry Advocacy Award Finalists
Elizabeth Molyneux – AGL Energy
Hayley Jarick – Supply Chain Sustainability School
Jacqueline Brotherton – Transport Women Australia Limited
Jodie Sainsbury – Kickass Women
Joy Marrocco – AGL
Rose Read – National Waste & Recycling Industry Council
Shay Chalmers – Strategic Engineering
Sonja Malcolm – Sydney Metro

Safety Advocacy Award Finalists
Proudly sponsored by BOC Ltd
Annastasia Denigan – Cement Australia
Lyndal Denny – Women In Trucking Australia
Maddy Holloway – CITIC Pacific Mining
Nadine Yousef – Sydney Trains
Natalia Trewin – WesTrac Pty Ltd
Noelani Reardon – Transport for NSW
Terese Withington – Weir Minerals Australia Ltd
Tracey MacDonald – BAE Systems Australia

Mentor of the Year Finalists
Clytie Dangar – CRC ORE
Dayle Stevens – AGL Energy
Kylie Jones – Diageo Australia
Marie Varrasso – Officeworks

Excellence in Manufacturing Finalists
Josie Costanzo – Brickworks Building Products
Marina Melik – Boeing Aerostructures Australia
Rebecca Parnell – Artisan Food Company Pty Ltd
Rochelle Avinu – Leica Biosystems
Samantha McDonald – Bluescope

Excellence in Mining Finalists
Carlie Hayward – BHP
Clytie Dangar – CRC ORE
Jacqueline Madsen – Caterpillar
Kim Parascos – iVolve Industrial Technology
Rose Lindner – MMG
Sarah Withell – BHP
Terese Withington – Weir Minerals Australia Ltd

Excellence in Engineering Finalists
Proudly sponsored by BAE Systems Australia
Elizabeth Taylor – RedR International
Jane MacMaster – Engineers Australia
Jo Withford – Department of Transport
Lesley DeGaris – Boeing Aerostructures Australia
Lidija Dumbaloska – Sydney Trains
Mandy Petrides – Bosch Australia

Excellence in Transport Finalists
Agnes Lesson – Elgas
Camilla Drover – Transport for NSW
Danelle Kempton – Dananni Haulage
Jane Gillespie – Arup
Lyndal Denny – Women In Trucking Australia
Melissa Strong – Lindsay Australia Limited

Apprenticeship program key to ongoing industry success

Melissa Tinetti didn’t start out thinking she would be the associate dean of Industry programs at RMIT University. But it’s a fulfilling job that she enjoys and there is plenty to do, with literally hundreds of students to look after.

Tinetti’s first 10 years in the workforce had her utilising her architecture degree before she took time out to start a family.

“As a kid, I was always building things such as treehouses and I was making things with my hands,” she said. “And I did a drawing class at school in Year 9 and from that point on I realised I loved drawing and understanding how things could fit together. I started technical drawing from Year 10, so would have been 15, in a class with all boys. From that point I had a real passion for building and design and I pursued that as a career.”

She returned to the workforce to work in a small practice as a project architect.

However, it wasn’t long before Tinetti thought she would give teaching a go, and secured a role within the Building and Construction faculty at RMIT University.

“I thought that it would be really great to give something back, to an industry that had given me so much,” she said. “I applied for a teaching role in Building and Construction at RMIT University and that is where it all started.”

READ MORE: AIP training course heads to NSW

Ten years later, Tinetti’s current role at the School of Vocational Engineering, Health & Science at the same university keeps her busy. It was in this role that she was nominated as a Rising Star of the Year at the 2019 Women in Industry Awards.

Tinetti’s role is a big one. She heavily involved in looking after the apprenticeship program at the university, which she describes as a mini-school within the campus, as well as the Cert II, III and IV courses, plus diplomas and advanced diplomas.

Apprenticeships in particular, have been a hot topic recently due to a looming skills shortage. So much so, that at the beginning of August, the Queensland government announced that it was putting aside $32 million to offer free apprenticeships to any person under the age of 21 who had left school. The government was hoping that up to 60,000 young people would take up the offer.

“I find this role challenging. I came to RMIT as a teacher in Building and Construction and while that is my passion and I taught in that program for four years, I needed more of a challenge which I found in a coordinators role,” she said. “That led me onto the program manager’s position. That doesn’t sound like a big role, however there were nearly 700 students and 25 teachers, which was almost a small school within itself. I was part of a strong team that helped to grow it to that size.”

“I managed that program for four years ,and then I found myself looking for something else. This was the next step for me in my career. I have now got a couple of little mini schools if you like, operating their own programs, which is very different for me.”

She does find the role challenging on many levels, from dealing with the numbers of students and all their needs and wants, through to issues such as those being disruptive in class, as well as meeting the expectations of the industries that will be receiving the graduates. As well as electrical, plumbing and carpentry apprentices, she also looks after those in the instrumentation and refrigeration sectors, both of which are relevant to the food and beverage industry.

“We have a lot of students who come through the program and end up working for Woolies and those types of companies that are doing the refrigeration for their outlets, which I think is a pretty big job in itself,” she said. “There a not a lot of them around, which makes it difficult to get teachers in that space, too.”

Although some of the courses could do with a few more students, there is a silver lining for those who are in the apprenticeship program. With some TAFE courses – and a few university ones, too – there is an oversupply of graduates. Engineers, instrumentation specialists and refrigeration electricians don’t fall into those categories. Tinetti gives a recent account of where she thinks the current lie of the land is as far as graduates. It’s good for those who are thinking of going to TAFE over the next couple of years.

“Recently, we were looking at starting a new advanced diploma and needed students to run a pilot program.

“This would have been a pathway for our current students so I thought that filling this would be easy,” she said.

“I thought, ‘I’ll sit down and ring them all and see where they are now that the year is over’. So I sat down one afternoon and rang all 120 of them. Fifty-four per cent of them had decided to pathway into a higher education program. The other 46 per cent had a job already, or were travelling. There was no-one who said, ‘no, I don’t have a job’. I am also lucky enough to work in areas where students can walk into a job and also be able to continue with their studies.

“The students who are doing Cert II don’t have jobs yet, they are doing their pre-apprenticeship,” she said. “If we can encourage these students at this stage to continue with that trade, then we have something to work with. We’ve had some really large numbers of those students come through this year, that will help industry, which is the whole point of free TAFE.”

And the future? Tinetti is positive that industry will be well served by the graduates that are coming through her doors.

“Over the next three or four years I’d like to see our trades program having a footprint that will provide opportunities not only for students, but help industry, too,” she said.

Of seahorses, eczema and organic food

After growing up on a property in Tasmania’s Tamar Valley and being involved in growing food from a very young age, Emma Greenhatch’s career was always going to involve food. How a nominee for Social Leader of the Year at the 2019 Women in Industry Awards came to be working in the Sunshine Coast after nearly a decade working for the Victorian Government in a range of food industry-related roles, is a compelling story.

“My daughter had severe eczema since she was a baby,” explained Greenhatch. “We had a holiday on the Sunshine Coast four Christmases ago and after a week in Mooloolaba, her skin was completely clear for the first time in her life. Despite having just moved from Gippsland to Central Victoria, the prospect of her not having to battle this condition made it an easy decision and off to the Sunshine Coast we headed.”

And it wasn’t as if there was a job waiting for Greenhatch when she arrived in sub-tropical South East Queensland.

“I was completely open to what I would be doing up here,” she said. “Before the Victorian Government, I had been involved in micro businesses, developing export markets for live seahorses believe it or not – so I have an affinity for small businesses and start-ups.”

After spending the first few months exploring the beautiful beaches and hinterland, Greenhatch was engaged by Food Innovation Australia (FIAL) to write their inaugural Celebrating Australian Food and Agribusiness Innovations book. One of the companies she interviewed was Gourmet Garden for their lightly dried herbs and their head of Innovation – Jacqui Wilson-Smith, who is a founder of the Food and Agribusiness Network (FAN) and the current chairperson – invited Greenhatch along to a FAN networking event in March 2016.

“I was amazed by the openness in the room that night. There was an energy that’s hard to describe until you attend a FAN event. Collaboration has become such a buzz word but here it was happening right in front of me and it was real. I was so inspired that I joined the FAN board as a director for six months, before moving into an operational role and being appointed general manager,” said Greenhatch.

Established by the industry for the industry, FAN is a not-for-profit food industry cluster that has been operating for 3.5 years. It was founded on the basis of larger food companies “giving back” by sharing their knowledge, experience and resources with small businesses.

FAN’s mission is to empower the food industry to grow together, and today, they have 280 members from across the Greater Sunshine Coast including input suppliers, growers, manufacturers, retailers and service providers. Greenhatch said that this is purposeful because if the industry is growing, then the whole value chain is growing. This has a positive ripple effect throughout the wider economy. On clusters, Greenhatch says that they can address opportunities and develop solutions to problems that individual businesses may not be able to solve on their own. They foster a culture of co-opetition, where businesses simultaneously compete and collaborate in non-threatening areas.
Europe has a long history of businesses clustering, in Australia it is relatively new.

Greenhatch is excited about the prospect of FAN creating a sustainable cluster model that can be used as a benchmark for new clusters starting out.

“For the first two years, we focussed on building a culture of collaboration by bringing members together as much as possible to learn and share. As relationships and trust developed among members, they started working together and coming up with ideas for FAN programs and services. An example of this is 10 of our members share a national relationship manager who helps them to increase their sales and distribution.”

There have been hundreds of member collaborations – everything from developing new products and utilising each other’s waste, to sharing freight and supporting each other at trade shows.

This time last year FAN was very much in start-up phase, with the majority of FAN’s revenue coming from FAN’s members, sponsors and partners. It was fortunate to receive matched industry funding under FIAL’s Cluster Programme, which has transformed the business. It has gone from a team of two to six and expanded its member services.

One of these was Meet the Makers, FAN’s own mini tradeshow that was held in March this year. More than 400 people attended this event to sample products from 65 FAN members and hear their stories.

Although FAN is not-for-profit, Greenhatch sees it as an entity similar to an SME. And it’s not just because of the size of the cluster, but also the similar dynamics that both it and small businesses share.

“We are a small business like 85 per cent of our members. It is a rewarding job going on the journey together because we really understand the challenges of running and growing a small business,” she said.

FAN has had a strong community of supporters from the outset including local councils, corporates and research organisations.

“We are led by our industry members but those relationships with different levels of government and other industry stakeholders is vital,” said Greenhatch. Not only do they contribute funding that helps FAN to grow, they offer many programs and services that are relevant to our members. And because we work so closely with our members, we can provide valuable insights into the challenges and opportunities that our food and agribusiness industry is facing and play an important advocacy role.”

Greenhatch says that critical to FAN’s success has been retaining an industry-led focus, consistently engaging with members and being very agile to quickly respond to an opportunity or member need. “We have a whiteboard wall in our office that’s covered in ideas from our members and we always have members popping in to our office at the Big Pineapple to share their news and ask for help.”

When asked what she loves most about her role, Greenhatch was quick to respond. “The people. The food industry is so diverse and full of incredible businesses and individuals with stories that most people never get to hear. We do and it’s such a privilege to be in a position to share these. We also have a unique opportunity to influence how the industry grows. We have recently formed a partnership with EPIC Assist to support more people with disabilities to work in the food and agribusiness industry.

“I believe that clusters like FAN are key to ensuring that we have a healthy, competitive and sustainable food industry into the future. In the words of Helen Keller: ‘Alone we can do so little, together we can do so much.’”
www.womeninindustry.com.au

Women In Industry Award winners announced

Women in Industry Awards winners were announced last night at a gala event at The Park, in Albert Park, Melbourne.

Nominees and winners came from all facets of industry including food & beverage, transport, manufacturing, mining, as well as logistics and materials handling.

The full list of winners are:

Social Leader of the Year
Penelope Noelle Twemlow, CEO and Chair, Women in Power

Rising Star of the Year
Diana Delac, Site Engineer, Fulton Hogan

Business Development Manager of the Year
Melissa Waters, Marketing, Brand and Innovation Manager, Hebel & Velocity

Industry Advocate Award
Alice Edwards, Technical Project Engineer, The Crane Industry Council

Safety Advocacy Award
Kristen Sandford, Safety Manager, CSR Ltd

Mentor of the Year
Celeste Ward, Process Engineer, Stantec Australia

Excellence in Manufacturing
Amber Burdett-Dow, Customer Experience Program Manager, BOC

Excellence in Mining
Jodi Moffitt, Manager Planning, Roy Hill

Excellence in Engineering
Alana Duncker, Senior Consultant, Stantec Australia

Excellence in Road Transport
Sondra Kremerskothen, Group Manager – Training, Linfox Australia

Food & Beverage well represented as finalists in Women in Industry Awards announced

Individuals from food and beverage businesses are among the more than 70 finalists named across 10 categories ahead of the 2019 Women in Industry Awards on June 6.

Exceptional women from a range of industries will be recognised at the Women in Industry Awards, a gala dinner event and award ceremony being held at The Park in Melbourne on June 6.

Food and Agribusiness Network GM, Emma Greenhatch, is among eight finalists in the Social Leader of the Year category.

The Rising Star of the Year category includes Allied Grain Systems’ Emma Godsell, while Mentor of the Year has Amber Burdett-Dow from BOC and Rebecca Stringfellow from Vesco Foods up for gongs.

The full list of finalists is available here. Tickets for the event are also on sale – join Food & Beverage Industry News among other key partners for an evening of celebration.

When: Thursday 6 June 2019, 6.30pm
Where: The Park, Albert Park, Melbourne
Dress code: Cocktail

 

Australian woman shares success as a health food manufacturer

More than a decade ago, an Australian naturopath started hand-mixing cereals for clients who wanted healthy options that weren’t readily available in the market.    

Without knowing it, Narelle Plapp had started her path to creating a muesli manufacturing business that would bring clients aboard from as far afield as China.

In the past 12 years, Plapp has owned two health food stores, founded the muesli brand Food for Health, and just 12 months ago she started a manufacturing business called Grain and Bake Co Australia.

Her businesses continue to flourish, but the getting there required a lot of determination and risk.

READ: Congratulations to the winners of Women in Industry Awards 2018

“I was living off the smell of an oily rag at the ripe old age of 24,” said Plapp. 

“I started as a naturopath and had created some recipes for patients.”

The cereals Plapp made for clients had essential botanicals that are said to help aid in liver cleansing, as well as having other health benefits.

Twelve years ago, there were few options for people wanting a truly healthy cereal, she said. Plapp saw a gap in the market for muesli that was low in sugar and high in nutritional value.

“I took a leap of faith to do it on my own.”

That leap of faith has not only allowed her to succeed as a businesswoman, but it’s also given her the opportunity to mentor other women in the food industry.

Muesli manufacturing doesnt stop at the bowl

Plapp’s success was recognised when she was nominated as a finalist in the 2018 Women in Industry awards, for the Excellence in Manufacturing and Mentor of the Year categories. 

She is currently mentoring three people, with regular catch-ups every second month.

“Some are university students who want inspiration and one is someone that just started a business. I’m particularly passionate about women in business.”

She sees the importance in giving people support as she too has experienced working on her own to achieve business goals that can be daunting at times.

“It can be intimidating,” said Plapp.

She enjoys helping people succeed, while also learning from the people she is mentoring.

“When you’re talking to younger people it certainly gives you a different perspective. I like the challenge they put back on me,” said Plapp.

While mentoring is important to Plapp, she also supports people in other ways. 

Wellbeing is more than eating nutritious foods

Coming back to work after having a child can be difficult, so she offers flexible working hours to staff, but this isn’t limited to women. Plapp, who has two children, believes all parents should also have the chance to spend as much time as possible with their families. 

“If your child is in a school play you might as well get out and watch it and make it up another day. What I can do is support people through a journey through how you juggle that,” she said.

Within hours of having her children, Plapp was back on her laptop because work never stopped for her. But she understands the difficulty some parents face when trying to get back into a work routine. Accommodating employee’s needs is a must in her company.

With a focus on employee wellbeing, as well as the health of consumers, Plapp is making a name for herself in the health foods sector.

Grain and Bake, based in Melbourne, is a contractor manufacturing brand that has eight brands on board after just 12 months.

“We’ve certainly got a huge plan. We are already selling our Grain and Bake brand in China. We currently support our partner there,” said Plapp.

“It is certainly a long way from when I used to hand mix the muesli, however I am more passionate, driven and determined than ever before.”

Plapp works hard and encourages others to do so too by supporting them during their entrepreneurial journeys.

While it was hard work, she said it was still a labour of love.

Congratulations to the winners of Women in Industry Awards 2018

The Women in Industry Awards were held at Doltone House, Jones Bay Wharf, on June 14, in Sydney. It was an amazing night that saw nearly 200 participants from a diverse range of industries come together to celebrate and promote the achievements of women in making valuable contributions to their sectors.

We congratulate the winners on behalf of the Prime Creative Media team and we hope to see you all next year.

The winners in each category of the Awards were decided through much deliberation by the panel of judges as follows:

Rising Star of the Year – Proudly sponsored by Atlas Copco
Allison Basford – Property Development Manager, CSR LIMITED

Mentor of the Year – Proudly sponsored by CS
Gita Pendharkar – Senior Educator, RMIT University

Safety Advocacy Award – Proudly sponsored by BOC
Juliet Maynard – People and Safety Manager, Monier Roofing

Excellence in Manufacturing
Anna Hopkins – Founder, The Low Carb Living Group

Industry Advocacy Award – Proudly sponsored by COG Advertising
Elena Gosse – Chief Executive Officer, Australian Innovative Systems Pty Ltd

Social Leader of the Year
April Whittam – Manager Brand and Sponsorship, Aurizon Holdings Limited

Business Development Manager of the Year – Proudly sponsored by manark
Federica Guidi – Global Sales and Business Development Manager, VISA Global Logistics

Excellence in Mining
Jacqui McGill – Olympic Dam Asset President, BHP

Excellence in Engineering
Xiaoke Yi – Theme Leader Computing, Communication and Security, Australian Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology

Excellence in Road Transport
Jacquelene Brotherton – Transport Manager, Oxford Cold Storage

Women in Industry is back for 2018!

This is your opportunity to celebrate the women who are driving change in your industry and in doing so, breaking down barriers and creating new possibilities for the next generation.

The Women in Industry Conference and Awards are returning from a successful 2017 edition. Join us on Thursday 14 June 2018 in Sydney, for this highly anticipated event!

The Conference and Awards aim to encourage and recognise the success achieved by women in sectors that have traditionally been male-dominated, including road transport, logistics and materials handling, infrastructure, manufacturing, mining and engineering industries.

This conversation is one that requires both women and men to be involved and to help in this process, we’re encouraging all Conference attendees to bring a male colleague with them.

Get your 2-for-1 ticket here.

Thursday 14 June 2018

Conference: 9:00am – 5:00pm, Doltone House Hyde Park

Awards: 7:00pm, Doltone House Jones Bay

Women in Industry Awards 2018 – nominations now open

Nominations for the Women in Industry Awards, the annual event celebrating women who are making a mark in the Australian industrial sector, are now open.

This opportunity only comes around once a year, so now is the time to consider those women who have achieved success through their leadership, innovation and commitment to their sector.

This is your opportunity to recognise the women who are driving change in your industry and – in doing so – breaking down barriers and creating new possibilities for the next generation.

These may be women you work with, women whose achievements are inspiring you from afar, or women who are providing you with invaluable guidance and support. We believe their dedication and exceptionalism should be celebrated.

Nominations are open in 10 categories and will close on 30 April 2018.

WHEN: 6:30pm, Thursday 14 June 2018
WHERE: Doltone House, Jones Bay Wharf, Sydney

To nominate, click here.

WIIA2017Edit- (76 of 612)

Congratulations to the winners of this year’s Women in Industry Awards

We would like to thank all attendees and finalists for joining us at this year’s Women in Industry Awards. It was amazing to celebrate and promote the achievements of so many women in industry, and we hope to see you all next year. Through much deliberation, the judges decided on 10 winners:

Rising Star of the Year – Proudly sponsored by Atlas Copco

Michaela Craft, Region South Pacific – Energy Coordinator, BOC

Social Leader of the Year Proudly sponsored by COG Advertising

Beverly Williams, Industry Pathways and Placement Coordinator, Automotive Centre of Excellence Bendigo Kangan Institute

Business Development Manager of the Year – Proudly sponsored by ABB

Shelley Hyslop, Major Account Manager, ATOM

Safety Advocacy Award Proudly sponsored by BOC

Catherine King, Country Health, Safety and Environment Manager, ABB Australia

Excellence in Manufacturing – Proudly sponsored by Manark Printing

 Lisa Lamb, Manufacturing Director – Products of National Significance, Seqirus

Excellence in Mining Proudly sponsored by MMD

Gina Rinehart, Executive Chairman, Hancock Prospecting

Excellence in Engineering Proudly sponsored by Cummins

Philippa Craft, Product Manager, Bulk Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen, Helium, BOC

Excellence in Road Transport Proudly sponsored by NatRoad

Pam McMillan, Chair, Transport Women Australia

Industry Advocacy Award Proudly sponsored by MEGATRANS

Penelope Twemlow, CEO, Energy Skills Queensland

Mentor of the Year – Proudly sponsored by CSR Lightweight Systems

Penelope Twemlow, CEO, Energy Skills Queensland

 

 

 

Limited tickets for Women In Industry left

Organisers have advised that limited tickets to the fourth annual Women in Industry Awards and Conference remain for next week’s event in Melbourne.

New to the 2017 edition, the all-day conference will be held at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre from 9.00am to 5.00pm on Thursday 22 June, and will be followed by the Awards night at Peninsula, Central Pier Shed 14 in Docklands.

The Awards recognise the achievements of women working within the mining, engineering, road transport and manufacturing industries, and aims to raise the profile of women within industry, as well as promote and encourage excellence.

Awards Facilitator, Lauren Winterbottom, revealed the host of the 2017 edition of the Awards to be television personality, Gorgi Coghlan, best known as a presenter for The Project.

“It is an honour to be the host of the fourth annual Women in Industry Awards,” Coglan said.

“I’m looking forward to celebrating the inspiring women who are leading the Australian manufacturing, mining, engineering and road transport sectors.”

“We’re proud to have Gorgi Coghlan to Emcee the night, which provides an opportunity for professionals to celebrate the women who have succeeded in contributing to the manufacturing, engineering, mining and road transport industries.

“The Women in Industry Awards has been considered a night not just to celebrate the achievements of the Award finalists, but now it is reinforced by an all-day conference where we can really discuss ways to grow the numbers of women in the respective industries.”

According to Winterbottom, tickets to the Awards night and Conference are limited and selling fast. Tickets are available online.

(Image L-R: Trailer Magazine Editor, Bianca Dohnt, and 2016 Women in Industry Commercial Road Transport Award winner, Melissa Taylor, Taylor’s Removals)

Women in Industry Finalists

Nominations for the Women in Industry are in, and there are some fantastic candidates that have been put forward. All nominees have been reviewed and our panel of judges has narrowed down finalists in all categories. Below is the list of those in contention. Congratulations to those who have made the final. We look forward to seeing you all at the event on at the Peninsula, Central Pier Shed 14, Docklands in Melbourne.

Social Leader of the Year
This category recognises those individuals who have significantly effected positive change within their local or regional community.

Sue Anne Ware – University of Newcastle
Beverly Williams – Automotive Centre of Excellence Bendigo Kangan Institute
Amy Wells – Boral Australia
Penelope Twemlow – Energy Skills Queensland
Emma Bebe – ABB Australia
Susan McAllen – CSR
Nancy Crawford – BlueScope Flat Steel Products

Rising Star of the Year
Recognition for individuals who show significant promise within their chosen industry or who have reached new goals at the start of their career.

Sarah Jensen – CSR
Hannah Stewart – Stows Waste Management
Clare Dring – Fulton Hogan
Ella Baker – CSR
Victoria Zhorina – Schmitz Cargobull Australia
Zoe Bull – Cummins South Pacific
Bhavna Pandian – Eaton
Catherine Crumpton-Pratt – CSR
Nancy Crawford – BlueScope Flat Steel Products
Michaela Craft – BOC

Business Development Manager of the Year
This category seeks out Business Development Managers who have created new growth opportunities which allowed their organisation to expand and generate greater revenue.

Mireille Saylav – Admiral Seating Pty Ltd
Christine Nasymth – CSR
Shelley Hyslop – ATOM
Renee McGinty – CSR

Industry Advocacy Award
Recognition of individuals who have helped shape a positive view of their industry and/or helped to create a policy change which benefits those working in the sector.

Gina Rinehart – Hancock Prospecting
Glenda Bennington – Boral Australia
Penelope Twemlow – Energy Skills Queensland
Corinna Unger – Sole Trader
Emma Bebe – ABB Australia
Najwa Khoury – CSR
Karen Stanton – HTA
Alice Mabin – Al Mabin

Safety Advocacy Award
Safety is of utmost concern and this category highlights those individuals working actively to improve safety for their industry.

Sarah Averill – CSR
Christine Morgan – Smarter Safety
Alanna Ball – Women in Safety
Tracie Dickenson – Daryl Dickenson Transport
Elizabeth Valentine – Gippsland Water
Rachel Gangur – CSR
Catherine King – ABB Australia
Kimberlie Smart – Formula Chemicals (NSW)
Sharon Smith – CSR
Katrina Burns – SCT Logistics
Samantha Gates – Orrcon Steel

Mentor of the Year
This category recognises those individuals who have demonstrated a commitment to developing female talent within their organisation and wider industry.

Gina Rinehart – Hancock Prospecting
Beverly Williams – Automotive Centre of Excellence Bendigo Kangan Institute
Jessica Barber – Austral Bricks (WA)
Penelope Twemlow – Energy Skills Queensland
Christine Morris – Joy Global/Komatsu Mining Corp.
Nishmin Hallam – Taylor Thomson Whitting

Excellence in Manufacturing
This category recognises an individual who has thought ‘outside the box’ to implement an outstanding personal contribution to their manufacturing business and the wider manufacturing community.

Mireille Saylav – Admiral Seating
Gabby Montagnese – New Age Caravans
Paola Tornatore – CSR
Lisa Lamb – Seqirus
Angela Housmann – Frosty Boy Australia
Karen Stanton – HTA
Kimberlie Smart – Formula Chemicals (NSW)

Excellence in Mining
This category recognises individuals who have made a positive contribution to one of the many facets of the mining industry.

Gina Rinehart – Hancock Prospecting Pty Ltd
Penelope Twemlow – Energy Skills Queensland
Fiona Berkin – Morris Corporation
Christine Morris – Joy Global/Komatsu Mining Corp

Excellence in Engineering
This award recognises an individual who has shown leadership in engineering, technological excellence and innovation.

Gita Pendharkar – RMIT
Nishmin Hallam – Taylor Thomson Whitting
Nirupa Chander – ABB Australia
Philippa Craft – BOC
Shardie Johns –  ABB Australia

Excellence in Road Transport
This category recognises an individual who has gone above and beyond to improve and positively impact the Australian road transport industry.

Pam McMillan – Transport Women Australia
Melanie Cosgrove – SRV Road Freight Services
Kellie Boland – Boland Transport Services
Maggie Welsh – Welsh Freight Services
Julie Russell – Russell Transport
Elizabeth Valentine – Gippsland Water
Cate Hull – FreightExchange
Alice Mabin – Al Mabin
Kristine Alleva – AcQuum Consulting
Katrina Burns – SCT Logistics
Zeba Mohammed – BOC
Sarah Rosales – Hino Motor Sales Australia

For more information, click here.

The 2016 Women in Industry Awards

The Women in Industry Awards have launched for another year, focusing on women excelling across a number of fields.  

Last year’s awards saw more than 150 attendees  
The awards run across 10 categories  
Women are consistently achieving greatness and excelling in their chosen fields within the mining, engineering, manufacturing and process control industries and we think their talent should be acknowledged.  

The 2016 Women in Industry Awards recognises and rewards the achievements of women working in the industrial sectors, and aims to raise the profile of women within industry, as well as promote and encourage excellence.  
Manufacturers’ Monthly has teamed up with PACE and Australian Mining to acknowledge women who have achieved success through their invaluable leadership, innovation and commitment to their sector.  

The program aims to recognise women who are leading change in their chosen field and breaking down the barriers in what can often be male-dominated industries.  
The awards seek to single out and reward women who have created innovations, driven productivity, spearheaded change, and provided social and economic benefits through their fields.  

The only awards program of its kind to encompass mining, manufacturing and engineering, it also encourages the industrial world to raise the profile of women working in the differing sectors by embracing diversity and flagging clear paths for the next generation to follow.  

And with so many thought-leaders together in one room on the night of the awards, it provides a forum for women to meet and exchange information, ideas and solutions to problems and offers individuals an opportunity to expand personal and business networks, maintain awareness of industry developments and make a contribution to other women in the industrial sectors.  

Editor of Cirrus Media’s industrial publication Australian Mining, Cole Latimer, said the program was important in recognising the contributions being made to the changing face of industry.  
“Though female participation has risen across all industrial sectors in Australia, companies are still focusing on more innovative attraction and retention strategies to foster this growing talent and support young women working in the sector.  
“Women already working in the sector make up a big part of these support programs.  
“They are paving the way for others and achieving great success, and we thinks this needs to be recognised in its own right.”  

Any women working in the industrial sector can enter the awards, with the event culminating with a cocktail event to be held next year.  
So help us recognise the women making a difference today!   

Event date: 23 June 2016
Nominations open: 8 Feb 2016
Nominations close: 22 April 2016